Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Reader Question: Who makes your most used late winter/early spring jackets and sweaters?

Photos by Salt Water New England
Reader question for the community:
I am curious - which jackets and/or sweaters are your most used for that time coming up when bulky jackets are no longer needed?  Any specific brands or styles would be appreciated.  
Baracuta G9, 1980s

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Quoddy Shoes - Made in Lewiston, Maine - On Sale

Photos by Salt Water New England
Quoddy shoes are 20% off until Sunday 1/20/2019. Use code ALL20 at checkout.

Styles include:




For the Photovores...

Photos by Salt Water New England


Monday, January 14, 2019

Out and About

Photos by Salt Water New England

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Blossoms and Tarnish

Photos by Salt Water New England


Saturday, January 12, 2019

The Challenge of Eating Well in Winter

Photos by Salt Water New England

Friday, January 11, 2019

From a few months to sixteen years old...

Photo by Salt Water New England

A Little Inside Spring

Photo by Salt Water New England

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Scratchy Photos from the 80s and Early 90s

Photos by Salt Water New England
Where were these taken ?


Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Decisions, Decisions - Pink or Green...?

Photo by Salt Water New England
York River Traders sticks the landing with their colors, and their pink and their green are no exception. All items are U.S. made.

Nothing Like Low Morning January Light to Catch the Dust (and cobwebs...)

Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Thinking Ahead

Photo by Salt Water New England

Thinking Ahead

Photo by Salt Water New England


Monday, January 7, 2019

Fenwick

Photo by Salt Water New England

By the Door

Photo by Salt Water New England
Left to Right:  Hunter Outdoor; Cordings of Piccadilly; Dubarry of Ireland, Barbour (and a few more Barbours squeezed in...)

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Neighbors...

Photo by Salt Water New England

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Around the Bay

Photo by Salt Water New England

New York Times: The Unbearable Heaviness of Clutter


In The New York Times:
[C]lutter... might be stressing you out more than you realize....
[A] research team... found a substantial link between procrastination and clutter problems....  Among older adults, clutter problems were also associated with life dissatisfaction. 
-  Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi <https://nyti.ms/2RsAXII>

Friday, January 4, 2019

S.W.N.E. Acronym List

Photos by Salt Water New England

Thursday, January 3, 2019

Begging

Photo by Salt Water New England

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Tweeds

Cordings Tweeds - Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Leadership after WASPs (Re-posted by Request)

Choate Headmaster Seymour St. John (left) greeting Yale President Kingman Brewster (right) - Photo by Salt Water New Engalnd.
An essay appeared in the Wall Street Journal, and was received this morning (December 21, 2013). The conclusion is as follows:
“What our new meritocrats have failed to evince—and what the older WASP generation prided itself on—is character and the ability to put the well-being of the nation before their own...  Doing the right thing, especially in the face of temptations to do otherwise, was the WASP test par excellence. Most of our meritocrats, by contrast, seem to be in business for themselves. 
Trust, honor, character: The elements that have departed U.S. public life with the departure from prominence of WASP culture have not been taken up by the meritocrats. Many meritocrats who enter politics, when retired by the electorate from public life, proceed to careers in lobbying or other special-interest advocacy. University presidents no longer speak to the great issues in education but instead devote themselves to fundraising and public relations, and look to move on to the next, more prestigious university presidency... 
Thus far in their history, meritocrats, those earnest good students, appear to be about little more than getting on, getting ahead and (above all) getting their own. The WASP leadership, for all that may be said in criticism of it, was better than that.”  
- Joseph Epstein, The Late, Great American WASP, The Wall Street Journal 

Friday, December 28, 2018

Reader Question: How do you make a house distinctive, and what are the common mistakes made by people who have tried but failed?


A reader question: 
Season’s Greetings!  First off, I have so enjoyed your blog since finding it this past summer.  Thank you for taking the time to create and maintain it; your effort shows.  
I have some questions for the community.  
What makes a home distinctly SWNE?  What differentiates it from a poser’s?  Which items are passed down and which ones are bought new?  What about color schemes, fabrics, and patterns?  Artwork?  Ducks?  Threadbare Persian rugs?  In regards to rugs, are these always passed down or are they ever purchased “used”?  In Paul Fussell’s book, Class, he provides a list of items potentially found in a living room.  Some items add points whereas others result in a subtraction.  The higher the end points, the higher the occupant’s “class.”  How fascinating!  
What home items are indicative of a higher social standing?
Thanks again for all you do.

Thursday, December 27, 2018

The Winter Sale at Cordings

Photo by Salt Water New England
Many Cordings items are currently on sale, including the Men's Firley Herringbone Tweed Field Coat above.