Saturday, January 19, 2019

The Breeding Stock for America's Yankee population...


“The seventeen vessels that sailed to Massachusetts in 1630 were the vanguard of nearly 200 ships altogether, each carrying about a hundred English souls. A leader of the colony reckoned that there were about 21,000 emigrants in all. This exodus continued from 1630 to the year 1641. While it went on, the North Atlantic Ocean was a busy place. In the year 1638, one immigrant sighted no fewer than thirteen other vessels in midpassage between England and Massachusetts. 
After the year 1640, New England's great migration ended as abruptly as it began. The westward flow of population across the Atlantic suddenly stopped and ran in reverse, as many Massachusetts Puritans sailed home to serve in the Civil War. Migration to New England did not resume on a large scale for many years—not until Irish Catholics began to arrive nearly two centuries later. 
The emigrants who came to Massachusetts in the great migration became the breeding stock for America's Yankee population. They multiplied at a rapid rate, doubling every generation for two centuries. Their numbers increased to 100,000 by 1700, to at least one million by 1800, six million by 1900, and more than sixteen million by 1988—all descended from 21,000 English emigrants who came to Massachusetts in the period from 1629 to 1640.” 
- David Hackett Fischer, Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America <http://amzn.to/1XzrlFo>


Friday, January 18, 2019

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Reader Question: Who makes your most used late winter/early spring jackets and sweaters?

Photos by Salt Water New England
Reader question for the community:
I am curious - which jackets and/or sweaters are your most used for that time coming up when bulky jackets are no longer needed?  Any specific brands or styles would be appreciated.  
Baracuta G9, 1980s

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Quoddy Shoes - Made in Lewiston, Maine - On Sale

Photos by Salt Water New England
Quoddy shoes are 20% off until Sunday 1/20/2019. Use code ALL20 at checkout.

Styles include:




For the Photovores...

Photos by Salt Water New England


Monday, January 14, 2019

Out and About

Photos by Salt Water New England

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Blossoms and Tarnish

Photos by Salt Water New England


Saturday, January 12, 2019

The Challenge of Eating Well in Winter

Photos by Salt Water New England

Friday, January 11, 2019

From a few months to sixteen years old...

Photo by Salt Water New England

A Little Inside Spring

Photo by Salt Water New England

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Scratchy Photos from the 80s and Early 90s

Photos by Salt Water New England
Where were these taken ?


Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Decisions, Decisions - Pink or Green...?

Photo by Salt Water New England
York River Traders sticks the landing with their colors, and their pink and their green are no exception. All items are U.S. made.

Nothing Like Low Morning January Light to Catch the Dust (and cobwebs...)

Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Thinking Ahead

Photo by Salt Water New England

Thinking Ahead

Photo by Salt Water New England


Monday, January 7, 2019

Fenwick

Photo by Salt Water New England

By the Door

Photo by Salt Water New England
Left to Right:  Hunter Outdoor; Cordings of Piccadilly; Dubarry of Ireland, Barbour (and a few more Barbours squeezed in...)

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Neighbors...

Photo by Salt Water New England

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Around the Bay

Photo by Salt Water New England

New York Times: The Unbearable Heaviness of Clutter


In The New York Times:
[C]lutter... might be stressing you out more than you realize....
[A] research team... found a substantial link between procrastination and clutter problems....  Among older adults, clutter problems were also associated with life dissatisfaction. 
-  Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi <https://nyti.ms/2RsAXII>

Friday, January 4, 2019

S.W.N.E. Acronym List

Photos by Salt Water New England

Thursday, January 3, 2019

Begging

Photo by Salt Water New England

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Tweeds

Cordings Tweeds - Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Leadership after WASPs (Re-posted by Request)

Choate Headmaster Seymour St. John (left) greeting Yale President Kingman Brewster (right) - Photo by Salt Water New Engalnd.
An essay appeared in the Wall Street Journal, and was received this morning (December 21, 2013). The conclusion is as follows:
“What our new meritocrats have failed to evince—and what the older WASP generation prided itself on—is character and the ability to put the well-being of the nation before their own...  Doing the right thing, especially in the face of temptations to do otherwise, was the WASP test par excellence. Most of our meritocrats, by contrast, seem to be in business for themselves. 
Trust, honor, character: The elements that have departed U.S. public life with the departure from prominence of WASP culture have not been taken up by the meritocrats. Many meritocrats who enter politics, when retired by the electorate from public life, proceed to careers in lobbying or other special-interest advocacy. University presidents no longer speak to the great issues in education but instead devote themselves to fundraising and public relations, and look to move on to the next, more prestigious university presidency... 
Thus far in their history, meritocrats, those earnest good students, appear to be about little more than getting on, getting ahead and (above all) getting their own. The WASP leadership, for all that may be said in criticism of it, was better than that.”  
- Joseph Epstein, The Late, Great American WASP, The Wall Street Journal