Photo by Salt Water New England

Saturday, October 29, 2022

Whisky

 

A reader question:

Following on from some comments on the "Subaru" post, may I ask the readers a question. (I was going to say less contentious, but I may be wrong!).

What are the communities favourite whiskies and or whiskey's? My personal favourite whisky is The Macallan (I'm currently on a 12 year old single malt port cask), my favourite whiskey, being the son of a Bushmills man, is naturally a Bushmills 10 year old single malt. Personally I'm not a fan of the Islay peaty malts, but each to their own. I drink it neat or with a small drop of water. Never with ice!

 

47 comments:

  1. Glendronach 12-15 at Christmas.

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  2. The Balvenie 12 yr old, and the Laphroaig 10.

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    1. Did you read the question properly? The Laphroaig is a famous Islay malt peaty malt which the reader said that he is not a fan of. So what was the point of that suggestion?

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    2. I thought this was the question: "What are the communities favourite whiskies and or whiskey's? "

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    3. Patsy, you are absolutely correct, that is the question!

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  3. While I understand the basics about whiskey, its rival spelling whisky, and something of how whiskeys from different parts of the world differ from one another, the sophistication of my palate is lacking. That said, I am a fan of the peaty single malt stuff like Laphroaig. The lighter a whiskey is, the harder it is for me to appreciate its nuances, as the "bite" of the alcohol overtakes the more interesting details. A splash of water does help.
    For an astonishingly brief time, some eons ago, I worked in bartending. One day, a spokesman from Dewar's with a pleasantly rolling burr came by and gave an impressive spiel on the finer points of blended scotch. He had us try the brand he represented alongside Johnny Walker Black Label, which I much preferred at the time and, as it happens, still do.

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  4. My regular pour is Glenlivet 12 ... Glenlivet 18 for special occasions

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  5. Abelour A'bunadh. A sherry bomb that never fails to deliver a glass full of surprises.

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  6. Laphroig and Macallan! But never in my Subaru Outback.

    Kind Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

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    1. As I posted above, Laphroaig is a famous Islay malt peaty malt which the reader said that he is not a fan of.

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    2. Heinz-Ulrich, now that could be a separate question - what cars do whisky drinkers drive. Watch this space!

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    3. The whiskey, Bowmore!! The car, my Eurowagon rocket sled!! Enough said…:)

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  7. Try Cotswolds whisky An English whisky developed by an American who realised the Cotswolds were a perfect place to make whisky The gin is rather good as well

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  8. I am also not a fan of Islay peaty malts but there are so many other to choose from. Rather than recommend a particular brand, my suggestion is to visit a specialist whisky store for a tasting. As a general rule, the more you can pay, the better the whisky so set a realistic budget per bottle before you go.

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  9. Does whisky pair at all with coffee? I’ve never been much of a whisky drinker. But I am a dedicated “cafe corretto” fan (coffee with grappa). And when in France I always take a “caffe calva,” coffee with calvados. In both instances the grappa and the calvados are served separately. Add some alcohol to spike your espresso. But save some to refill your empty espresso cup, and enjoy, before you get on with your day.

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    1. "Does whisky pair at all with coffee?" Yes, it's called an Irish coffee.

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    2. An early morning Cognac and an espresso, standing up at a bar, is not a bad breakfast for many hard working Parisians.

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    3. Whiskey pairs with anything that has a molecular structure! I’m a finance professor, I should know! Lol

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  10. Replies
    1. Another Islay peaty malt that the questioner is not a fan of!

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    2. He asked for people's favorites. He said he's not a fan but to each their own.

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  11. Laphroaig and Talisker, but I won’t say no to Johnny Walker Black.

    I prefer 1 or 2 cubes depending on my mood. Hold the Subaru, please.

    Prost!

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    1. Both peaty malts, one from Islay and the other from Skye! Has anyone bothered to read the question properly? Most of the suggestions so far have been irrelevant.

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    2. This is the question: "What are the communities favourite whiskies and or whiskey's?" He does say that he dislikes Islays, but that does not mean a responder should not say one is a favourite or favorite. And to answer the question, Monkey Shoulder for regular occasions and Glenmorangie for special ones.

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    3. Anonymous - did YOU read the question - lol? "What are the communities favourite whiskies and or whiskey's?"

      You seem a little on edge. Perhaps a peaty malt would help?

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    4. Yes, I read the question. Hence my answer. Prost!

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  12. My favorite Scottish whiskies are Ardbeg and Bowmore, but I also like the Sherry notes in Aberlour, the honey notes in Dalwhinnie, and the perfect balance of Glen Rothes. My favorite (other than the very rare and overpriced) bourbons are Milam and Green single barrel, distilled by my son in law, and Old Grand Dad bottled in bond. Our well bourbon is Evan Williams bottled in bond. I also very much like Knob Creek, both their bourbon and their rye. Old Overholt is the well rye. Special occasion whiskeys include Old Willet, Peerless, and the fond memory of Rip 10 YO for thirty dollars, a much better wheater than Makers, in my opinion.

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  13. My very first whiskey, going back to my late 20s, was Dalwhinnie (yes, I loved the honey notes). I have had Ardberg, as well as Laphraoig, Lagavullin and Macallan, all very nice. I have to be careful these days with the old liver so I don't drink as much anymore but earlier in the year after a fine dinner at friends' place in France, I had some Bruichladdich, which was delicious; light, with vanilla and honey notes, and is probably my new favourite.

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    1. My in-laws call it "Teacher's Little Helper" (both retired educators...) - hrplo

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  15. Balcones Baby Blue, Four Roses Yellow label, Evan Williams

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  16. I'm not usually much for American whiskeys, but the story of Uncle Nearest, the enslaved man who taught Jack Daniels himself how to distill whiskey, is more than enough to convince me that a bottle of Uncle Nearest will be my next whiskey purchase. Has anyone here tried it? I was reminded of this fact today and thought I'd add a comment.

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    1. My wife and I enjoy Uncle Nearest, both the 1884 expression and the harder-to-find, higher-proof 1856. We went to a promotional tasting that one of his descendants held at a liquor store on Martha's Vineyard, and it's been our go-to Tennessee whiskey ever since. (And if you'll forgive a bit of pedantry, Nearest's famous student was Jack Daniel, no s, who made Jack Daniel's whiskey.)

      I tend to have more Scotch whisky than American whiskey, with my usual evening pour (over a large ice cube) being Johnnie Walker Green Label, a blend of four single malts. I also enjoy Highland Park, Talisker and Aberlour, and my very favorite is Lagavulin (though I understand it wouldn't be the original poster's preference). The latter three I have neat with a few drops of water. Across the water in Ireland, Teeling is an excellent choice.

      Among American whiskeys, besides Uncle Nearest, I'm partial to ryes, particularly Knob Creek, Michter's and Whistlepig. And I recommend looking into Japanese whiskies as well -- I especially like Suntory's Hibiki.

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    2. I likewise tend to prefer Scotch whisky to most any other variety. Thanks for the recommendations -- and sometimes a little pedantry is welcome, indeed helpful. This is especially true if said pedantry is prefaced with "...if you'll forgive a bit of pedantry,...".
      The season for switching from gin and rum-based drinks to the more warming stuff has arrived. Your response, along with this post, helps me narrow down the abundant options. It also ensures that I'll no longer put an "s" at the end of the name, Jack Daniel, without an apostrophe.

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  17. Redbreast Irish Whiskey

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  18. For the scotch curious in particular:

    Edradour is a fine Scottish highland single malt distiller. One of the few independent scotch distillers remaining. Unlike most modern whiskeys, the majority of their offerings don't add artificial colouring agents. Most of their whiskey are also fantastic starter single malt for your whiskey curious friends, as Edradour isn't nearly as peaty or harsh as many of its counterparts.

    Surprisingly most Scots don't *regularly* drink scotch as much as one would think, as it's mostly an export good (they're gin drinkers in daily life, scotch is for the weekend and celebrations).

    But any pub or cocktail bar in Scotland catering to locals will always have a good Lagavulin and 1-2 Ardbergs (as already recommended in this conversation), both of which are highly recommended for a bit more kick or peat flavour.

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    1. I once spent a cold but delightful couple of winter months in ancient house in the Cairngorms. A small town was a few miles away. The town folk drank beer, and I was a true curiosity for having a backpack loaded with a single malt and a glow in the dark Frisbee. We quickly drained the bottle. I have no recollection what it was.

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  19. Woodford Reserve.

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  20. Powers John's Lane. A nice Irish single pot from Dublin.

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  21. Johnny Walker Black, single ice cube, in memory of Christopher Hitchens. Several Thanksgivings ago, my brother brought an 18 yo Macallan to dinner. Only after a few drinks did he admit that he'd meant to get something not quite as expensive, but when he got to the checkout girl at the liquor store and learned the price, he was embarrassed to put it back for that reason.

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  22. Wow, lucky diners to get 18 year old Macallan. Pure nectar!

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  23. Any 18 yo Speyside whisky finished in a sherry cask is best. Personal favorite is Cardhu 18, but nearly unobtainable. The 15 yo is also great. Arran whisky in port, Sauternes or Amarone cask is magnificent and underrated .

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  24. Ardbeg Ten Years Old served in a Glencairn glass. No ice, no water.

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