Photo by Salt Water New England

Friday, April 9, 2021

Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (June 10, 1921 – April 9, 2021)

 

A reader question:

Muffy, I just heard the sad news that Prince Philip passed away.  I am curious what fellow SWNE readers think about his legacy (including clothes, of course!) and what does it mean going forward?



28 comments:

  1. (You might want to adjust those dates -- he was born June 10, 1921.)

    I lived in London 2013-17, and Philip at that point was seen mainly as an amusing rogue. It was hard to get mad at his gaffes, delivered as they were with astringent good humor and without malice. A colleague of mine was at the queen's annual garden party once, which involves a long receiving line at Buckingham Palace. Philip said to a woman in a wheelchair, "At least you get to sit down through the whole thing."

    He did have a classic British style of dress, calling less attention to itself than Charles's double-breasted jackets. I don't recall Philip putting a step wrong, sartorially.

    And of course he was a steadfast companion to the queen, both of them playing mysterious and difficult roles in an increasingly anachronistic institution. He was imperfect, but so are we all. May he rest in peace, and (in a phrase from Judaism that I love) may his memory be for a blessing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very well said indeed. RIP. He will be missed.

      Delete
  2. I think the legacy of duty and the necessity to keep buggering on stands in stark contrast to some of the current players.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed. Among the last of the greatest generation. He and his like will be missed greatly. It's unlikely we'll see them again in our lifetime.

      Your intrepid reader from north of the 49th,

      Banacek

      Delete
    2. I understood buggering to have a different meaning in the UK.

      Delete
    3. Patsy: "Bugger" can be used as flexibly by the British as certain of our coarse expressions over here. Churchill used to say his motto was "KBO" for "keep buggering on," but he supposedly also said (he denied it) that the traditions of the Royal Navy were "rum, buggery, and the lash."

      Delete
  3. Sanford TalliaferroApril 9, 2021 at 9:18 AM

    He had dignity combined with a sense of humor and the willingness to be outspoken. He was not mealy-mouthed. He was not politically correct. About ten years ago, I was teaching in an all-boys private school, and I taught all the guys to "stand like Prince Philip" at morning assembly: hands behind the back, one foot turned outward, leaning forward slightly. My tribute.

    ReplyDelete
  4. A stalwart of the old school. Not many like him to come this way again.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That no one remains who will call out people, places and things as "ghastly", even though they are.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Considering his colorful upbringing, he served as a brilliant #2 to a woman I have looked up to since youth.

    ReplyDelete
  7. We put out our Union Jack first thing this morning and are mourning Philip today. I agree with what has been said above and think there are SO many wonderful things to to be said about this colorful, passionate and interesting man. But I believe the main word would be FEARLESS.

    ReplyDelete
  8. For all of his human shortcomings, of which we all have plenty, he seemed to be the right man for the queen over a long and challenging reign. He was among the last of a very specific sort of figure and will be missed by generations old enough to have appreciated such men. May he Rest In Peace and may his family be comforted that he lived such a long and full life.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Like an iceberg much of who Prince Philip was people did not see, or know. Like his remarkable Mother he had an incredible life and made the world a better place for having been here. He will be missed.

    ReplyDelete
  10. A sad day indeed. Forgive me, but at the same time, I cannot help but wonder what Harry and Meghan, Meghan, Meghan, Meghan. . . MEGHAN (!!!) will have to say in the wake of Prince Phillip's death and the negative spin they will put on his passing.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What!!?? Why would they be anything but heartbroken?

      Delete
    2. I very much doubt that they would put "a negative spin" on this event. Prince Harry was very much his grandfather's favourite and no doubt, he will feel engulfed by grief. Meghan did not have a contentious relationship with the Duke of Edinburgh and she will know better than to say anything unfavourable. It will, however, be very awkward and difficult for Harry to be amongst his family when he flies over for Phillip's funeral.

      Delete
    3. Anon 7:50, you mean, why would they be anything but heartbroken after their prime-time Oprah interview where they trashed the monarchy that Philip's wife, Harry's grandmother, spent her entire life protecting while she served her country diligently? The one that aired while Philip was in the hospital, and the Queen was contemplating the death of her husband of 73 years? Indeed, why would they?

      Delete
    4. Anonymous at 2.23am, Here here - from the UK. She doesn't even understand what she's so casually trashing.

      Delete
  11. I remember watching Philip in the International Driving Grand Prix at Windsor,
    an event in which he finished second. The Palace had convinced Philip that polo
    was too dangerous for a man in his 50's, so he had taken up four-in-hand driving to fill the void. In a relatively short time, Philip had become one of the more skilled drivers in the world. My English host, a man from humble beginnings, won the event and it surprised me to learn that he and Philip were great friends and he would introduce me at a reception for American driving enthusiasts at Buckingham Palace. As it turned out, Marshal Tito of Yugoslavia died that week and Philip was off to attend the funeral in Belgrade. But we did get to talk horses with Princess Anne. I got the feeling she would have been happier mucking stalls than having to deal with a gaggle of Americans.

    MGC

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I watched an interview of this gentleman last night. The Duke had been his friend for nigh on 40 years and was tearful talking about how Phillip very much treated him as his equal. They obviously shared a great friendship and will be very much missed.

      Delete
  12. God rest his soul, and God bless, save, and comfort Her Majesty in her time of grief.

    ReplyDelete
  13. As someone who is, literally, to the manor borne, I take it personally that with the prince no longer with us, our lives, all, will be poorer, sadder. I know how he was a unique partner for Her Majesty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It’s “to the manner born”, unless you mean the BBC sitcom.

      Delete
  14. May he rest in peace. The more I learn about Prince Phillip, the more I admire his mind, manner, and marriage. God save the Queen.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I met prince Philip at a private dinner party at the time of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. We have both excused ourselves to go to the men’s room. Standing beside each other he struck up a conversation with me. The conversation continued as we walked back to dinner. I ended up Joining him for drinks several times that week. He was quite a bit of fun and pleasure to be around. I enjoy those few days. Fond memories indeed

    ReplyDelete
  16. May he rest in peace. Prince Philip is a truly inspiring example of duty, dedication, perseverance, encouragement, and wit. A model for us all.

    ReplyDelete
  17. He was my favorite Royal. A man's man. I probably liked him because some of the stuff he said that got him in trouble is something I might say. But not out of ill will.

    ReplyDelete