Photo by Salt Water New England

Friday, June 3, 2022

The Jeep Wagoneer

The Jeep Wagoneer

I have never, personally, seen the appeal of Jeep Wagoneers, wood paneling and size notwithstanding.  However, there are many people out there who think quite highly of them. 

So, if you are a fan of Jeep Wagoneers, would you elevate them to the status of iconic Americana? 

Photo Credits:  Muffy Aldrich



 

28 comments:

  1. Iconic, but I have never been excited about them.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The orignal Jeep Wagoneer that evolved into the Grand Wagoneer was designed by Clifford Brooks Stevens and was responsible for numerous successful automotive designs.Brooks is best remembered as a post war industrial designer and stylist. The Jeep Grand Wagoneer was built in the USA, fairly simple design and if maintained, durable. The curious should read up on Brooks Stevens, he was an American classic, and I believe his Jeep Wagoneer is also.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I would say yes! I do love the look of a classic Jeep but far prefer the handling and look of a Volvo.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The Jeep Wagoneer is a very good looking vehicle. Mechanically, it pales in comparison with the Toyota Land Cruiser.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Owned 1984 Grand Wagoneer made by Chrysler. A lemon. Had extended warranty, Road driving only. Transfer case went out & other numerous issues.
    Fuel capacity 18 gallon tank with 10 mpg on highway. Better be looking for a gas pump. Style over substance. Sold it ASAP. Had a 1983 240 GL Wagon with roof rack & third seat. Currently drive a 1992 240 DL wagon in town & 2013 Toyota Land Cruiser on highway. Owned Suburbans as well. The Riceburners have no peer as compared to Range Rovers & Land Rovers.
    See a few around town showboating acting like an urban guerilla. Enuff said.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We as well had a Jeep Grand Wagoneer growing up in the late 80s on Long Islands north shore. Turned out to be love hate relationship - the thing was either half the time being a family hauler and half the time in the shop. The oddest things would break such as the time the interior door handle cracked in my fathers hand or radio knob broke off. Next stop was Volvo dealership, traded the beast in for a refined 240 wagon…problem solved! Must say had the same happen 20 years back with a Disco II LandRover - love/hate, replaced with a Volvo XC70…problem solved! Should have learned from my father!! Lol

      Delete
    2. I have owned Volvo only once, 10-12 years ago and I don't think it's the same quality like it used to be.

      Delete
  6. When i lived in stowe VT , i had one and loved it . I sold it in 2011 and have been sorry every day since . In all my years of car collecting , the jeep wagoneer woodie , and a red 2016 Challenger have gotten the most attention . While out driving them , at least twice a day , people would come up to me to chat about them , they have/had almost rock star like cult status . Meanwhile , my porsche boxster, and 82 ferrari 308 , never got any attention, and you think they would have .

    ReplyDelete
  7. I would see the Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer as significant old-line SUVs in the American heartland of the Midwest, Appalachians, mountain West. Not so much in CA, TX, Pacific Northwest, or New England or the South.

    Interesting alternative to Suburban, but not as hardy as International Harvester Travelall. No question that Land Cruiser is the beast to beat of all of them, but they were not popular in the Wagoneer's homeland.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Came close to buying one a couple of times, but they did not handle particularly well. If you go the site bringatrailer.com, you will see recent sales prices as high as $76,000 for a 1991 model.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Grand Cherokees were popular around my hometown in the last 80s-early 90s, and I liked them. The new ones appear to be total creampuffs.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I have great memories of one of those. It wasn't a full-on faux wood-panelled one but a faded yellow one that belonged to a college girlfriend's family for their Nantucket summers. She'd pick me up at the evening ferry when I'd come across and the drive out to Madaket with the windows open and us singing along with Springsteen's
    'Spirit in the Night' playing on the radio was the best way to start any summer weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Ha! My dad had one when I was a kid. I remember the giant baking pan on the passenger side floor to catch all the rain and snow that somehow came in through the firewall and dash. When my legs got long enough that my feet could reach the floor, I had to contort myself around the sloshing pan of water.

    ReplyDelete
  12. We had an 86 Grand Wagoneer-great SUV for travel to VT each winter weekend to ski-comfortable, but horrible for maintenance-we even had to replace the gas tank after three years-and most of the engine parts-but, in its day, it was the best . Same color as in article. To get to Sugarbush, we had to make certain to refuel before stations closed-traveled form Fairfield County.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Good looking, classic style, but, as others have mentioned, not the best mechanically (like most Chrysler products, especially in the 80s). But, because of the iconic styling, many people have a love/hate relationship with them. Much like the Land Rover, I suppose. Great to look at, but mechanically a nightmare.

    ReplyDelete

  14. I've had three of them...a '77, a '78 and now an '88. You have to be somewhat handy with a wrench to own one. And you have to be happy with the little victories such as having it start right up on errands - not leaking too much oil in your parking spot, have all the windows go up and down when desired., averaging 13 mpg..things like that. But us old guys love 'em,,,and we get compliments every time we take 'em out for a spin. And their value is going up like crazy.

    ReplyDelete
  15. No need to elevate it as it is already classic Americana along with the original Mustang, the Model T & Model A, the original Corvette, the Avanti, the original Thunderbird and the Checker Marathon. Prices are holding steady because there are several shops that restore them and sell them to Jeep fanatics.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Saw a brand new one bombing down the road Friday on the way to Maine for the weekend. Looked them up. The new reborn 2022-2023 versions start at $88,000 plus for the basic car. Immoral to spend that much money on a car, IMHO. Grin.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Agree - the new versions will be a flop!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Exactly my experience - the big Jeep was iconic in an '80's LL Bean way - "Great to look at, but mechanically a nightmare." In those days, I found solace in the wonderfully boxy, underpowered and surprisingly durable Isuzu Trooper II. Ready to ride with factory mud-brown paint and manual "everything". :-)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I love mine. It's been in the family forever. The '79 I had in college breezed through blizzards and flew down muddy camp roads in Maine. I've had a blast driving Wagoneers.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I remember these fondly from bush-partying days in high school/college. Seeing them now always bring back great memories. Now, for our "grown up" multi-faceted lifestyle, we are best suited with our luxury sedan and full cabin F-150. --Holly in PA

    ReplyDelete
  21. No Wagoneer, but had a '99 Jeep Cherokee Sport that I loved! Great on the highway and in the mud and snow. Used it to tow a small horse trailer, and pull unwanted bushes out.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Despite its faults, most definitely YES ... an icon of Americana.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I had one years back.....reliability was good and it didn't cost an arm and a leg to repair ....it was also a smart looking vehicle in a sea or mediocrity "1980's".

    ReplyDelete