Photo by Salt Water New England

Friday, January 7, 2022

Breakfast

Photos by Salt Water New England
Breakfast each morning is consistent:

  • Coffee.
  • Wheat Biscuit Cereal (with Whole Milk).
  • Fresh Fruit.

And then a bit later:

  • Yogurt with Nuts and Berries.



 

27 comments:

  1. Thank you for the snow photo!!! (Breakfast is nice, too.)

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  2. Especially love organic milk -- it tastes like melted ice cream!

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  3. Very good. Mix in a couple of eggs now and then, why not? Live a little.

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  4. I used to think "organic" meant it contained no petroleum products but I'm less sure of that now. My breakfasts consist of cold cereal alternating with a cheese omelet every other day, with oatmeal one day a week. All with lots of coffee.

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  5. Black pudding with tomatoes on toast or scrambled eggs or bacon and eggs for me

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    Replies
    1. I am not familiar with Black Pudding, will you explain it’s ingredients.

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    2. Pigs blood mainly with oats barley pig fat onion and spices

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    3. Frederick J JohnsonJanuary 10, 2022 at 2:31 PM

      Thanks, I will pass..

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  6. I alternate between bird bread (whole wheat, molasses, walnuts, sunflower seeds, and sunflower seeds) toast with avocado, home made harissa, a squeeze of lemon, and Maldon salt and, ccasionally, a taco of egg, perhaps a little crisped potato, a low carb flour tortilla, and salsa casera. Lots of French roast coffee.

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  7. A dear woman I know who turned 100 in August eats a very similar breakfast every morning.

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  8. Reassuring and delicious. Why change? Would love to see similar posts for lunch and dinner.

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  9. Oatmeal topped with strawberries, blueberries, chopped walnuts with a little maple syrup.

    Or, Grape Nuts, organic 2% milk topped with blueberries and strawberries.

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  10. There’s an old grocery store joke about the story of man’s life and Grape Nuts. It starts at the age of 10 and progresses, letter by letter, through the ages of 20, 40 and finally 70. “Pe” Nuts is the punch line.



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    Replies
    1. Now I get it! One by one, letter by letter, march through all stages of a man’s life. Very funny. Thank you.

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  11. What superb choices! Thank you so very much!

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  12. Our kids have steered our yogurt purchases toward Greek and Icelandic yogurt. Not sure why, they each have a slightly different flavor and consistency. Not bad.

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    1. European style (pourable) yogurt is wonderful. Trader Joe's is quite good, I prefer full fat.

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    2. Couldn't tell you why but the local supermarkets must carry six or eight types of sour cream. Apparently, each country in Central America favors a different style.

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  13. Good healthy stuff but so much plastic!

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  14. From Time:
    "The U.S. is one of the only developed countries without EPR bills addressing packaging. Germany enacted a “producer pays” law in 1991, and manufacturers have to collect, sort, and recycle packaging after consumers finish with it; similar laws were expanded to the whole European Union in 1994. Dozens of other countries, including Brazil, Estonia, Japan, Turkey, and South Africa now have EPR laws for packaging. And there are EPR laws for some products in the U.S.—Cassel counts 119 EPR laws in 60 jurisdictions, encompassing 14 different products, including paint and carpets."

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    1. Not only do you have to sort your trash if you live in Germany, you can't wash your car in front of your house. Our daughter lived there for three years. But the house had oil heat.

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    2. Well, considering that Germany is shipping majority of its sorted trash to Africa, Asia or other places, I hope it's not the example to follow...it's a similar situation with nuclear energy in Austria, it is forbidden to build this kind of energy plants in Austria by constitution BUT doesn't bother them to import it from neighbour countries. Hypocrisy and absurd!

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  15. Let's return to breakfast! Growing up Greek with grandfathers owning diners, we had a deep menu at all times. However, homemade plain Greek-style yogurt was always on the table. We didn't call it "Greek" as any other variety tasted thin or fruity! The "Ellenos" brand is spot on from my heritage and my grandpa would have liked their "coffee" flavor, as he felt that fruit was always on the side in original form - not blended into yogurt! ;)

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  16. Sounds most delicious. Me: Small, cold-brew coffee x two, (Chameleon Brand, in a low ball glass with three ice cubes )w/vanilla oat milk. Low acidity coffee. Then at noonish, light brunch of primarily greens and a grain. Just Egg egg substitute. Dinner can be salmon or beans, or a vegetable based soup with more, more, more greens. Keeps my weight and cholesterol down. (Oat milk is a good alternative for those with any history of heart disease. Nut milks are not always healthy, and can be very high in calories)

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  17. Chia pudding made with almond milk, topped with toasted almond slivers and fresh fruit.

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  18. When we splurge on yogurt...BROWN COW MAPLE. So amazing, and such a treat, like Häagen-Dazs Chocolate Chocolate Chip Ice Crème.

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  19. organic oatmeal with organic, homemade hazel nut milk, organic banana on the top and some organic blueberries and raspberries hand picked from organic farm and placed in the freezer for an entire winter season, some peanut butter and honey. Sometimes just omelet another day organic cornflakes with hazel nut milk. And cold smoked organic salmon from Ireland or Scotland over the weekend. Generally, the most important is quality of the food.

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