Photo by Salt Water New England

Sunday, July 25, 2021

Kayaking

Photos by Salt Water New England
Two questions for the community:

  • What is your favorite place to kayak?
  • What advice would you give people who were interested in taking up kayaking?

   



 

21 comments:

  1. Hadley Harbor or Cuttyhunk with our two very involved Jack Russells.

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  2. Have done a lot of canoeing. Have kayaked just a couple of times. Tell myself, and others, I like canoes better because one gets more leverage paddling sitting upright in a canoe, than sitting in a kayak. I suppose this is true. But, am thinking I might be missing something. Any observations by others who have done both ample canoeing and kayaking? Thank you.

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    1. I canoed for three decades before switching to kayaks 15 years ago. I will not go back to canoes. Kayaks fit you like a glove and you have more control than you might think. I just feel a more intimate connection with the water in the kayak and I feel as though I had more control (whether I do or not, I don't know), but I just love it. At least, give it a shot. Preferable on a slow moving river to start with.

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  3. Love Creek, Bethany Bay in Lewes and Beathany Beach, De.

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  4. I have both a kayak and a canoe, both Old Towns, although I can't say I've done all that much with either. The canoe is a big one, acquired with the idea of family use, which came to nothing. Personally, I'd rather have a very small canoe, something like a pack canoe. I see a lot more kayaks, though. There's a nice little pond about a mile from home, I think about half the size of Walden Pond. It has enough interesting things to keep me entertained for a good outing. It's the same place where I walk to, over the creek and through the woods. I usually see some water birds, especially geese. They make an awful mess but there were none there today.

    I'd suggest renting a kayak (or canoe) first. They come in a big variety, even including inflatables. There are also stand-up paddleboards. Consider where you might be going. We were at Assateague Island, Virginia, over the week and I saw a couple of kayaks out in the ocean. I knew several people when I was in college who kayaked and canoed but their interest was in white-water stuff. I stay in calm waters.

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  5. My wife and I been fans of our new, and old Old Town canoes here in Maine, but plan to give a kayak a try before the year is over! Thanks so very much!

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  6. I have six sit on top kayaks, meant for use in the ocean and I find I like them much better than the sit inside ones that I've tried. Mine have braces for your feet to provide additional support as well as a backrest, which I think should be mandatory. They work equally well on river and bayou kayak trips.

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  7. The Potomac River - we live within walking distance, and within about 15 minutes of a boathouse where we rent kayaks (we own a canoe). Have been kayaking and canoeing since I was a kid & led young people on canoe trips during college.

    I recommend renting at first, getting some basic instruction, and wearing a PFD - in half these photos, the paddlers aren't. In my view, that's unwise. Also, decide what kind of kayak works best before you drop a lot of money to buy anything. Basic paddling doesn't require a whitewater kayak or most of the related gear, and there are many types of kayaks, some better suited for lakes, open water (sea kayaking), rivers etc. than others.

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    1. I agree, the Potomac River is the best for kayaking and paddleboarding.

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    2. I agree with advice about getting instructions. It's smart to learn enough basic paddle strokes to be able to maneuver your boat into an eddy or to slow it down.

      I also suggest you learn about the stretch of river you’re going to be on. Check current water levels, whether or not there are any submerged trees in your path and what class of rapids you may encounter. If you’re paddling below a dam, find out when the water is normally released. Never underestimate the power of moving water.

      Always let someone know when and where you are going to be getting on the river and where you plan to get out. Don’t go alone.

      Enjoy! River kayaking is a refreshing way to spend a hot afternoon!

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  8. Dress for the water temperature, know the weather report, and wear a life jacket. The longer a boat is, the straighter it tracks and the farther it glides with each stroke.

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  9. Wellfleet harbor and into the bay past Jeremy Point to observe the great white sharks up close.

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  10. Know the tide and wind conditions for the entire time you plan to be on the water. Wear a PFD. Get the brightest kayak and paddle you can find, at the waterline you are pretty close to invisible to larger vessels. Rent first!

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  11. We're more whitewater kayakers although our hybrid/crossover kayaks track reasonably well for short sessions on flatwater. I wouldn't take them for a wilderness trek on the Boundary Waters. I grew up on a lake in North Georgia, and my first whitewater adventures were on the Little River in NE Alabama, the Chattooga in North Georgia, and the Nantahala in North Carolina. I've rafted the Cheat in West Virginia. We now live in Colorado where we kayak and raft the Upper Arkansas River and paddle some of the area lakes.

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  12. First I would recommend always wearing a life jacket! It keeps you safer and warmer. My mini schnauzer dog wears one too!

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  13. I do a fair amount of kayaking in Long Island Sound. Agree that renting a kayak would be a good idea. Different models of kayaks are built for paddlers of different sizes… a large paddler in a kayak built for a small-to-medium paddler is not a comfortable (or safe) situation to be in.

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  14. We just did a nighttime kayak trip in the mangroves off Captiva Island to see the bioluminescent plankton. Essential gear: PFDs & bug spray! Our family loves kayaking (mom, dad, two teens.)

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  15. I've greatly enjoyed kayaking in Farm Pond and Harthaven Harbor on the Vineyard, but we're staying up-island when we go next month and I'll have to try some new areas.

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  16. We kayak on a couple of small nearby lakes in Maine where we are likely to see loons.

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  17. Love the upper reaches of the Connectcut River for multi-day canoe or kayak expeditions. Level 2 and quick water alternate with serene stretches and there are lively sand beaches for camping.

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  18. I keep my kayak at Portland's East End Beach (rent the rack from the City of Portland). Lots of places to paddle around Casco Bay - Fort Gorges (you can get out and explore), Mackworth Island, Back Cove, downtown, all the islands. I almost always see a seal, eagle or osprey and love getting out as the sun is rising, before the place is filled with other craft - just me and the working lobster boats! All the safety tips here are great - you are also required by the Coast Guard to have a whistle (mine is attached to my life jacket, which is worn at all times). I also have a waterproof phone case through which I can take pictures, and extra line for tying up if the tides are changing (I speak from experience on this piece of equipment!).

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