Photo by Salt Water New England

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Bad diets killing more people globally than tobacco...


"But the biggest problem is not the junk we eat but the nutritious food we don’t eat..."
One way to get nutritious food is a local CSA/Food Share, where food is often grown in more sustainable environments:
















21 comments:

  1. Eat what your mother says to eat, lay off the tobacco, go easy on the alcohol and don't worry about the rest. People are starving in Europe.

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  2. Thanks for the farmer ~ opps, I mean ~ farm photos. :-)

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  3. Love the dog in the garden. My big orange tabby cat loved to sleep under the tomato plants.

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  4. The real enemy is sugar which is in an amazing number of foods. I have been on a sugar free and low carbohydrate diet for the last 10 days. Ice cream, bread, burger buns, pizza, cookies and potatoes have been cut out. I have been having lots vegetables and eggs as an alternative to potatoes. The effect has been incredible - over an inch off the waist and an almost flat stomach already.

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    1. I too eat low carb and have cut the sugar as much as possible. It's amazing how well you feel with out it!

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    2. I cut out carbs May 7 2017 and in 6 months dropped 34 lbs. I've kept it off, too. Zero carbs is the daily goal for me and it's easy to stay feeling full and with plenty of energy. It's not a diet, it's a way of life. Having said all that, pour diet choices is different than pour diet options. Thanks for the report highlighting the need for better dietary option everywhere.

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    3. I love sweets and sweetened coffee. But if I dropped 34 pounds, I'd be down to under 140 pounds and I'm 6'1" tall.

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  5. your handful of rich dark earth made me think of a sweet memory Muffy.
    my mother was from New England. my father was a Texan. back then only a world war could arrange such a romance! when he returned from the war he wanted to take her "back home." they were on the train for two days.
    his young bride woke him from a deep sleep when she saw RED dirt everywhere!
    to her chagrin we told that story often in our family.
    btw it was a happy marriage for years. only ending with his sudden lethal heart attack when I was 17.

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  6. I am always so amused by the advice, "Sow seeds in ground when all danger of frost has passed." I would guess that would be late May. It's 40 degrees here this morning in southern Connecticut and a possible "wintry mix" is predicted for this afternoon in higher elevations. How can anyone expect tender shoots like those pictured here to survive? Maybe hardy varieties? My grandmother always said peas should be planted by St. Paddy's Day, but that seems way too early. I never know what to think!

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    1. Peas are a cool season vegetable like kale. I've not grown peas before because the rabbits love them and I don't have enough garden space to grow enough for all of us ( I usually don't mind sharing).

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    2. In my wife's family, the saying is that peas should be planted on Washington's Birthday (in Virginia). That's what they said, anyway. My father, though, was a firm believer in planting according to "the signs," which I never understood. But he never grew peas.

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    3. BlueTrain, I plant by ' the signs' like your father. I also rely on the Farmer's Almanac which seems to be more accurate than our local weather forecasting these days. Farmers and gardeners know what signs to look for like the emergence of certain insects, soil temperature, moisture/drought, moon phases and more. I remember an old gardening rule to plant something when the forsythia bloom but I don't remember what that something was but I rarely see forsythia anymore. I've been binge-watching Gardeners' World on Britbox lately. I'm anxious to plant my garden this year.

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  7. How much sugar are folks eating that you feel THAT different without it? I can't even imagine life without sweets.

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    1. Patsy your comment reminds me of how I always ask people who drink diet soda how much soda they are drinking that they need to drink diet. It's like smoking light cigarettes.

      On a serious note, sugar is too abundant in western diets and it's dangerous for many reasons. I read last week on Medscape that insulin resistance is causing ' insulin-resistant schizophrenia'. I'm not surprised given how sugar affects dopamine receptors.

      I like real foods, real whole food ingredients and I like to cook. So, my mantra is to avoid foods with labels as often as possible and if I should desire a soda every once in a blue moon, there's nothing like the " Real Thing" :D



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  8. There is nothing like the smell of fresh turned earth! And today (if I am lucky) I will get to the garden center and buy lettuce/spinach/kale starts. So love gardening!

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  9. There is no such thing as a "bad" diet or "bad" food. The poison is the dose, not the substance in itself.

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    1. I get where you're trying to go, but this statement is demonstrably wrong. In English, the words "food" and "diet" imply an end, unlike, say, the word "red". Clearly "food" is not defined as "anything consumed." Ingesting iron ore does not make iron ore "food". As commonly used, "food" has an end like nourishment or edibility, from which it follows that the word is capable of having a value modifier. If it were impossible to put a value judgment on the word "food", that word would be a meaningless placeholder, indicating nothing beyond a mere identification or description of a substance as particulate matter, like "iron ore".

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    2. What I wrote is not only entirely correct but also scientifically proven.

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    3. I used to think that "organic" (food) was anything that contained no petroleum products. But I have come to believe that is no longer true.

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  10. In terms of evolutionary biology (what our genes are programmed to work with), the ketogenic diet RULES. Under 20 grams of carbs of any kind per day. You use "good" fats for energy, your appetite for starch and sugar goes down to nothing, and any time you haven't just finished a meal your body's burning its own fat for energy. No hunger or deprivation involved! My breakfast is pastured-pork bacon and my own home-grown eggs with "bulletproof" coffee. No need to eat again until late afternoon, after which "intermittent fasting" for 16 hours. Down 25 lbs. effortlessly since the first of the year, no cravings, food bill knocked in HALF! The only carbs you eat are green vegetables, preferably fresh and in season. Bon appetit!

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