Photo by Salt Water New England

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

J. Press, New Haven

Photos by Salt Water New England


Once J. Press began advertising their “Ivy Look” I knew I was never going back, nor was anyone who actually graduated from an Ivy League school. Pro tip:  the Ivy Look comes from graduating from an Ivy League school, not wearing a Press bow tie.  (Comment)

It is not a surprise that white nationalists wanted to come off as Ivy Style.  It was surprising was how little lovebombing it took for [an industry spokesperson] to hand over his credibility to them.  (Comment.)

Just how naïve or complicit [Industry spokesperson] was when he supported the appropriation of "Ivy Style" by the militant branch of the Republican party-including Ivy Style’s impossible-to-deny illegal stealing of photographs-may be the subject of future (real) Ivy dissertations. (Comment)

Why do liberals hate J. Press?  It is not just Tucker Carlson.  For the last decade, so-called Ivy Style fanboys have been associating J. Press with white entitlement fantasies.  A surprising number of spokespeople have supported this scam, helping online fanboys redefine plagiarism, illegally stealing photographs, and bigotry as “Ivy”.  As a result of their “you can be bad if you look good” ethos, many of the actual Ivy League students now think of  Ivy Style as they think of Bill Barr and tiki torches. (Comment)

J. Press has emerged as the classier alternative to a MAGA hat.  (Comment)

































The site of their original building.


























14 comments:

  1. Any word when they are moving back to York Street?

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  2. MARVELOUS images and Winter 1961 catalogue reprints. I remember that very year, and how that same catalogue landed in our mail, how my father would comb it through, and phone in his order. I refuse to count the years!!!

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  3. Thank you very much. Especially for scanning in the catalogue.

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  4. If only we could still buy quality made clothing at those prices!

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    Replies
    1. These days are long gone. What was standard quality once is now marketed as "premium". For premium prices certainly. Sad but true.

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    2. I couldn't agree more! It's so hard to find quality clothing. Too much "noise" surrounding less than superior brands.

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    3. The reality of American made garments are that they cost a lot of money to make. They have always been of "premium" quality and, now with global manufacturing, the contrast is just becoming much more apparent.

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  5. Heard they're reopening in NYC in the Yale Club building.

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  6. Oh, that catalogue! I agree with Alena, it is so hard to find quality clothing. cheers!

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  7. We were afraid to go into J Press. As 12 year olds we walzed without constraint or a care into and out of all the other New Haven haberdashers; Rosenbergs, Gentree, Saks, Gamer. And Barrie's. Barrie's loved the kids. And we lived Barrie's. If we were wearing their shoes, they shined them for us! But J Press, as soon as we walked in the door, "yes boys??" About face!

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  8. I think I paid $17.00 for my first Shaggy Dog in 1965. A lot of money back then when I was only working weekends at the car wash at $1.25 an hour. My need for need stuff is limited these days but I Press and LL Bean still serve me very nicely. Growing up in New Haven I have sorely missed the old classic stores Anon mentioned; although he forgot the old Yale Co_Op.

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  9. What a wonderful set of pictures! In particular, those of Tony Panico, who has been with J. Press New Haven since 1968 (if memory serves). For many, Tony represents the history, tradition, values and quality that J. Press represented.

    Tony still makes bespoke garments for some. This white flannel Blazer, is one of Tony's jackets:
    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/d6/ff/81/d6ff81d0b741215b3a585648662ca809.jpg
    And it turned just as all of Tony's stuff turns out:
    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/1f/f8/eb/1ff8eb4fbd24bf5e38a5f0894073d8d2.jpg

    Next year, God willing, Tony will have been at J. Press for fifty years!

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  10. Happy to report J.PRESS is indeed reopening in the newly expanded commercial space of the Yale Club on 44th and Vanderbilt. Also pleased as punch to report that the company is working to increase the focus on Made in USA items as well as improving the cut (namely, shoulders) of Canadian-made tailored wear.

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  11. First shaggy dog around Thanksgiving, 2004: $75, reduced from about $95 retail. Always a bit too long, so it rose up and made me look fat even before I had gained much weight. It's nice they now offer a more modern fit as well. It is, without question, an iconic look, that reminds me as much of sheep as sheep dogs.

    With some adjustments to modern fit and taste, J. Press' contemporary offerings should be made to look like this catalog again.

    All discussion of these clothes as representing "old money" or "WASPs" should cease. These clothes were first marketed to Americans around schools who largely wanted to imitate the English upper classes and so built neo-gothic ersatz-English colleges and wanted what was sold to them as tailoring done in complementary style. The imitators included people of all backgrounds, including the so-called "WASPs," an utterly meaningless and absurd category in an English context. In any case, what was created in the process may be most accurately be called American collegiate, which became democratized and widespread, copied at Sears and available at Local Campus Shop Near You. Most of the people who wore the look in the 60s and before would probably rather wear the old Sears versions of these clothes than most of what today is put forward as "Ivy" style. Or at least the tasteful among them.




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