Sunday, February 19, 2017

Reader Question For the Community: Where Will You Get Your Wellies / Rain Boots in 2017?

Le Chameau
A reader question:
Mud season seems to be coming a bit early this year.  I am looking to replace my rain boots, and I never know what to do.  Which boots have other people had luck with?  Is it worth it to go expensive or get by with cheap?  What are favorite brands, and which ones have gone downhill?  Thank you!
Options include:






Dunlop

Muck Boots

Muck Boots (on Left)




Darien Sport Shop

Hunter Boots Circa Late 1980s (Made in the UK)
Bogs

Joules (Comfortable, Easy On/but Made in China)




Le Chameau - Handmade in France but they can split with heavy wear.




40 comments:

  1. I bought my wife a pair of the Hunter "Women's Original Tall" rain boots in dark olive a couple years ago. They were well received and have done admirably, especially walking the dogs in the woods and fields during the spring melt. Hunter, like Barbour seems to have become a bit of a fashion commodity, but they still offer their core products among the ever-expanding panoply of colours and styles.

    I've been making due with a 3 or 4-year old pair of the 10" L.L.Bean Boots. They are unlined, but have not stained my socks; nor have I had any issues with the stitching. A regular application of dubbin aided by a hair dryer keeps them quite water resistant. Mind you I live inland, so am not wading through marshes and tidal flats with them. Heels and soles are wearing admirably, though I don't use them too much on concrete.

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  2. Sadly, most (all ?) Hunter boots now are made in China. Those made in China or elsewhere abroad are lower quality, do not seem to be made using the traditional method, and seem highly prone to leaks. I would buy a pair of Hunter wellingtons made in the UK, however. Sigh.


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  3. I have an old pair of L.L. Bean wellies I use to muck around in (easy on and off), but once I invested in a pair of Le Chameau, there is no comparison as far as comfort is concerned. Also, the zipper allows for a snug fit around the legs. They are great for walking distances and navigating brush and rough terrain. However, if you only need a messy weather boot, they may be a bit of an overkill.

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  4. I first became aware of Wellies when I was in college in England. One night, I stayed at an old inn and saw several pairs of muddy, green boots sitting outside the inn's old pub door. The well-worn boots just oozed authentic British country wear. Ever since, I have wanted a pair of green Hunter Wellies (preferably made in Scotland). However, I know the trouble the company has had and I realize that Le Chameau boots are now favored by many. (Alas, there is now a plethora of "posh Wellies" in all colors and designs - many very loud and shiny. A British newspaper did its own top ten ranking of current Wellie brands last year and Hunter wasn’t even on the list.) Sadly, it's a mute point for me because I live in a portion of the South that suffers drought conditions each year, so I have very few occasions to wear them. I know this is not helpful, but I'm eager to see what others say.

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  5. Just ordered a pair of black Le Chameau Vierzon Jersey . Purchased online as there's no dealer in my area .

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  6. Actually, Rockport waterproof walking shoes will do for me.

    MAGA!

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  7. Replies
    1. It is the choice of most of the rice farmers I know in SE Texas

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  8. Joules was one of the brands mentioned on here... they make a nice French sailor striped long-sleeved shirt (since L.L. Bean does not have the long-sleeved ones anymore.) Usually I wouldn't wear such shirts with any labels/logos but I make an exception with Joules.

    Not buying wellies because they don't give me enough fot support.. will stick to my unlined Bean boots.

    --EM

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    Replies
    1. If you're interested in the authentic French Breton (very high quality) go to: www,saintjamesboutique.com

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  9. From Southeast Alaska down through Vancouver Island, the San Juans and the Oregon coast, Xtratuf boots are the only choice (http://www.xtratufboots.com/). While we Pacific Northwesterners might spot some of your other suggested rubber boots at fancy dinner parties in Seattle or Vancouver, they aren't made for real work or real weather.

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    1. Disagree since they have changed to manufacturing in China. My vintage, Made in the US tuffs are better than anything else, but my Bogs are better than new tuffs.

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  10. I've been wearing a pair of Musto deck boots but they have split across the back and leak water quite heavily. It may be time to invest in a decent pair of Muck Boots.

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  11. My husband has a pair of Muck Boots that he loves. He wears them for tractor use around the property, outside chores, putzing in the garage if it's wet outside. They're warm and wear well. I have a pair of Hunter boots I use for gardening, but I wouldn't mind having a pair of Le Chameau. We got his Muck boots at a Farm and Yard store where we live, my Hunter's I believe I got on Amazon. Not sure where they were made, but I do believe it makes a difference. Sadly, quality has gone downhill for so many things now. But we keep trying to find well-made items as best we can.

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  12. My LLBean Wellies are at least 15 years old. Wear them, almost daily, throughout fall, most of winter (with liners) and spring to walk the dog. No leaks, no tears, easy on & off. I have Le Chameau; picky fit, I went down a size, but rarely wear them. Hunter - never!

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  13. While I think other people look nice in Wellies, I feel I'm at my most clumsy in them. I like my pair of Storm Chasers, picked up at LLB several years ago. They slide on and off quickly, although mine look a bit like the pair the horse is wearing in your photo. I probably should look into replacing them, and I'm seeing that the newer model looks nice enough to wear into town. They wear more like a clog, but I'm careful of where I step and they always keep me above the muck.

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  14. Love my Hunter's! They keep my feet dry, comfortable, easy on and off, adjustable and nice enough for church when needed. However I have muck boots from the farmers' Co -op for farm work. Having to hike out daily means that boots are not for show, but for necessity. We have plenty of boots in many sizes and styles for visitors.

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  15. Joules are a young British brand of comfort boots. I love mine for rainy days. Try Sierra Trading Post for Joules.
    But for me, my 30 year old Sperry duck shoes are my favorite for gardening and yard work. LL Bean still carries duck shoes.

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    Replies
    1. LL Bean duck shoes are still made by hand in Maine.

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  16. I have an ancient pair of LLBean wellies that are still going strong. My Hunter boots I would rate as adequate but my plain Le Chameau boots are by far the most comfortable with or without a liner. I was saddened to learn that some of their boots are prone to splitting.

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  17. LLBean,mine have lasted 30 years and are still going strong. Jane Keller

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  18. My Muck Boot Edgewater's have been comfortable and reliable for the past four years. They are completely waterproof and breathable. Perfect for any task from gardening to digging for clams at low tide in cold water. They aren't made in the USA, but they are well made, nonetheless.

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  19. Look for the "camo" Muck Boots and shoes designed to be worn hunting. The good ones are camo on the outside, blaze orange lining. They're much more ruggedly made, with MUCH better foot support than the standard "chore" editions.

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  20. Servus Northerner Max Hi Boot sold by Gearcor. Made in USA, economical at under $32, and utilitarian.

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  21. It's Muck Boots from Tractor Supply for us with limited shopping options. I love my Muck boots for time spent in the pasture or barn, but they get rather hot by late spring, and they certainly aren't pretty. I'd never wear them off my property to be seen in public.

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  22. L.L.BEAN unlined duck boots. I did buy a no-name pair of rubber wellie kinda look alikes at a feed store/farm supply place here and they served well. One of my daughters took them over.

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  23. I've been noticing that Hunters (in colors - especially black - other than the traditional green) are now apparently trendy for young women. Mine were acquired from L.L. Bean in the early 1980s and are labelled: "HUNTRESS / UNIROYAL /MADE IN BRITAIN." They're still in great shape.

    As an alternative to boots, I also love my Muck Boot Co. shoe-like footwear which I got at Reny's in Wells, Maine a few years ago. Great for gardening and yard work.

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    Replies
    1. I love Reny's! And I love Maine, too!

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  24. If one is seeking footwear to "make a statement," to project a desired self-image of "outdoorsy-ness" in what an ad-man would call an other-focused way, then by all means pursue the overpriced offerings which exist to dog-whistle a certain level of disposable income to fellow social climbers. But know that in so doing, you are merely making an "as-if" statement, not an authentic one. Think effete Brooklyn hipster lurking in Starbucks, dressed in lumberjack costume. Or Hummer H1 stuck bumper-to-bumber on the Merritt Parkway. You can run any "image" you like up the flagpole, but you don't get to choose who salutes--and who smirks.

    But if one is really after the most suitable boot for a messy activity, which can be anything from rainy pavement to working stern deck on a trawler up to one's hips in squid--you would do well to pursue the product best able to provide comfort, durability and protection--and the optics be damned.

    Either way, be authentic. ;-)

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  25. As a professional gardener, Muck Boots both high and low have been the most reliable for me. They wear like iron, are inexpensive, and I can pick them up at my local Tractor Supply.

    On another note. Glad to see you back, Muffy.

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  26. I bought a pair of Hunter boots about 30 years ago and they lasted for 15 years. My second pair lasted only about eight years. My most recent pair only barely three years. They split early on and I repaired them at least twice with the bicycle tire repair kit. Now made in China, Hunters are a cheap version of the original. I've had very good luck with the Barbour. I buy a size up and wear with heavy socks year round for field walking, gardening, and in the snow.

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    Replies
    1. I love Yankee thrift. I'm sure they will eventually need repair. When the time comes, I'll know how. Thanks!

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  27. Everyone has given valuable information! I will print this out and keep it in the event I eventually achieve my dream of moving to New England. Thanks all!

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  28. I concur with my fellow readers who have suggested Muck boots. I have a pair of their Waterfowler boots, and love the fact that they're constructed with flexible, breathable neoprene from the calf upward to the knee. While they're not traditional Wellies, they certainly fit my muscular calves well! I've worn them hunting, fishing, and to shovel snow, and they've always been both comfortable and warm. Highly recommended from this person--especially at the > $200 price point.

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  29. The original muck boot company
    Honeywell Safety Products USA

    http://www.muckbootcompany.com/

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  30. In the country we need no fuss, easy to hose off boots. Tractor Supply has no frills, heavy duty, muck boots. Can't be beat. Slide them on and away I tramp through the woods, marshes, and dirt roads.

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  31. I have a pair of Hunters that have lasted me years, but I feel a bit put off purchasing more pairs now that they are seen as "fashionable", at least here in the UK anyway. With Hunter it's best to stick with traditional green lest you want to make a fashion statement (not entirely the point of wellingtons).

    The ladies and gents down at the horse yard tend to all wear Le Chameau and I have been tempted but am put off the price seeing that they split with heavy wear! I have however seen with my own eyes that Princess Anne favours Hunter, so I may stick with her.

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  32. The Art of Living in the Country, The English Home - Aug. '16
    "The trouble with the townies is they simply do not understand that there are traditions which must be upheld. Firstly, there is a dress code: in the country, we dress for the weather and to blend in. Standing out and being different is not something we embrace when it comes to the sartorial. Wellington boots provide the perfect example: these should be green, black or - at an absolute push - navy blue. They should on no account be pink, patterned or - worst of all - pink and patterned at the same time. This rule can be broken by small children, but even so, wellingtons should be plain."

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    Replies
    1. Well said regarding traditions to be upheld. We continue on with so many other traditions, i.e., the turkey, the Christmas tree, why do people feel the need to break with other areas. I understand individuality all to well, but dressing for the weather is important and practical.

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