Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

The Year Begins in Autumn

Photos by Salt Water New England

The year actually begins sometime after Labor Day when the summer people have left and the kids are back in school. It is then the New England community pulls itself together for a new year. Town organizations become active again, the church makes plans for various regular activities, cultural events such as the Boston Symphony commence – in short, year-round life in New England begins in the early fall. And ends in June. July and August are more or less a pleasant never-never land. 

- Judson Hale, Inside New England







    

19 comments:

  1. And just like that, after Labor Day, the air and light are different.

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    1. And just like that, time seems to speed up after Labor Day. Until, that is, January 2. When things seem to grind to a halt.

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  2. Absolute perfection! Thank you so very much, for all you do for us!

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  3. Beautiful! Thank you for these magic moments that start our day.

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  4. Beautiful! Thank you for sharing.

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  5. Autumn in Maine always feels like the secret reward we enjoy for enduring the summers that are bogged down by tourists. Fall weekends still find us inundated with folks from away, but our peaceful weekdays return to us. Rarely do we darken the door of a chowder house between Memorial Day and Labor Day, but as soon as the last New York state plate has whizzed through the new high speed tolls at York, we'll find ourselves in front of a plate of hand-battered onion rings, a bowl of thin, milky clam chowder, and a sea of empty picnic tables. This, in fact, is the way life should ACTUALLY be, and for a month or so in Maine, it is. The grousing we do about the tourist industry that supports our economy is merely part of our vinegary charm. If they want hospitality and sugar, I'm sure the South would have them gladly.

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    1. Vinegary maybe, but charming it is not.

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    2. I agree with Sartresky.

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    3. I'm with Anonymous from Maine. One must not be accustomed to saccharine to appreciate the sweetness of acerbic charm.

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    4. The words "sweetness" and "acerbic" are totally opposite. Some Mainers need to face reality, and appreciate how much tourism supports so many livelihoods in that state. Especially after the pandemic lockdown.

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    5. 9:31 since you are addressing my comment: Nowhere did I state that Mainers do not appreciate the income brought in by tourists. Most native Mainers have a very dry wit and sense of humor. Sometimes it comes across as cold, indifferent or even acerbic as I mentioned above. Not everyone gets it and that's OK.

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  6. Well, it sounds an awful lot like the school year, especially college. Seeing the friends you made last year, getting settled into your housing, be it a dorm or off-campus, if you're lucky enough to be away from home. You look forward to the cooler days of autumn, which means football. Then the holiday break, followed by whatever winter might bring, but which is never enough to cancel classes. Another round of exams. And before you know it, you have to find a job in the real world. Then you begin to wonder if you could swing a post-graduate degree.

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    1. @BlueTrain, I agree. I'm 60 years old and for me the new year still begins in September.

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    2. There are other ways of looking at it, too. The Church year, for instance, begins with the first Sunday in Advent, which this year is at the end of November. Deer season starts in November, too, which day depending on the zone. It also starts in November in Maine, unless you're a Maine resident, when it starts a few days earlier. There's also football season but I already mentioned that.

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  7. Indeed! The days here in Central Michigan already have the look and sound of early fall, and I, for one, and looking very forward to the cooler days of September and October along with the shifting angle of the sun.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

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  8. Glorious 1st and 3rd photos and for me, quintessential New England!

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  9. So when will will the SWNE shop for photo prints finally open? Christmas is coming...

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  10. I reognize the corner of the Granite Hall Store in one of your pictures. We will finially be able to spend a week in Nobleboro and visit a friend in Searport next week. Mid- Coast Friends Meeting is on Zoom for the time being, so no get to see Friends there. Brown leaves are accumulating and being mulched already here in PA.

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