Photo by Salt Water New England

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Maine Coast, 1970s-ish

Photos by My Father


























 

31 comments:

  1. Charming and very inviting! Thanks.

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  2. This looks like a view of heaven.

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  3. I can see on Google Maps street view that the Rockport Marine building and the one next to it are unchanged, except that the sign on the chimney is gone now.

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  4. Padebco hasn't changed a bit...maybe more jack stands, less cradles, but it looks the same.

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  5. Having grown up in the '70s love the color and quality of the photographs. Takes me back. Thank you.

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  6. Pemaquid Point lighthouse, right? Haven't been there in a dozen years but there used to be a little general store there that had great blueberry pancakes.

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    1. Sadly that little general store (The Seagull Shop and Restaurant) burned to the ground last fall, but happily is being rebuilt. Progress is excellent although I don't know when the owners plan on reopening.

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  7. Kodachrome or Ektachrome? The colors are impressive for that vintage.

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    1. He shot mostly Kodachrome and a bit of Ektachrome. I cannot speak to the exact make up of these as I scanned the slides and then put them away.

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    1. Muffy, Can you recommend any slide scanners? You do a remarkable job of scanning your Dad's slides and the pictures you take are stunning.

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  9. God's country!

    At least one picture is from the late 80's - early 90's. The Toyota 4Runner is a 2nd generation model. They were manufactured between 1989-1995.

    This song may not be up to the high brow tastes of this community but looking at the pictures, Yo La Tengo's "Today is the Day" has always fitting for road trips up to York.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5riQ3epxcws

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  10. Heading to New Harbor this weekend to open up our cottage. I'm counting the minutes.

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  11. I love these photos, particularly those of the red barn/building seen from the water and that of the lighthouse with daisies in the forefront. With some time and distance away from your part of the world, that alluring photo of the red barn could easily be mistaken for an image of one of the Lofoten islands in Norway. Stunning!

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  12. Truly the way life should be! Thank you so much!

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  13. Fantastic photos. Thanks for sharing

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  14. If Port Clyde was a religion I would go to church.
    Thank you, these are so lovely!

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  15. Every time I look at a series like this, it's a mini mind vacation for me. Thank you for sharing.

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  16. The Sail Loft restaurant is missed! They had the best blueberry muffins on the coast. I liked seeing "real" wooden lobster traps. A bygone era.

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    1. Agreed, I miss the Sail Loft, too, and the Cheechako of Damariscotta as well.

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  17. Something I notice whenever I am in coastal NE, compared to seeing older photos, is in the past homes were in worse shape than the working buildings. Today the homes are typically pristinely maintained while the working buildings are in a state of lesser-repair. I'm not sure what this means, but I suspect it shows the influx of second-home-owners and a transition from working waterfront to vacation-oriented-waterfront. Not a bad thing or a good thing, just an observation.

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    1. Spot on. I agree.

      Writers such as Peter Matthiessen and Sebastian Junger captured this view in their works. In the not so distant past, the coastal areas of the New England and NY were dominated by the fishing industry. Locals who chose not to pursue commercial fishing still relied on the sea for food and basic income.

      As over-fishing depleted the dwindling supply, the government stepped in with regulation. As a consequence, this forced locals to convert the once thriving fishing industry to more of a tourism industry in an effort to salvage the economy.

      Modest homes were purchased in bulk and turned into inns or gentrified into upscale Summer homes for Private Equity guys in Boston. They sold the romantic charm of the historic seaside towns to outsiders who saw the Perfect Storm and wanted to drink at The Crow's Nest -- the staff were legendary for ignoring tourists and posers.

      As commercial fishing declined, tourism increased. This led to a spike in real estate sales and bed and breakfast rentals.

      Is this a good thing or a bad thing?

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    2. Hard to say what's good or bad. Depends on whether your an original resident or a "come here." Either way, I think things like this happen in other places, especially coastal towns. And it also happens to areas that have become popular as retirement areas for more affluent people. Fancy restaurants, garden centers and art galleries start showing up, displacing the hardware stores and little restaurants with blue plate specials. The roads get widened. About the only things that don't change are the undertakers and the liquor store.

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    3. I miss the scruffiness. Sadly, once gone, it cannot be restored.

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  18. I think you snuck in a few 1980's-ish photos in there. That Toyota Land Cruiser looks suspiciously like an 80's model, and the bashing suits those kids are wearing are definitely not from the 70s! But they do bring back good memories of care-free summers in the 80's!

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  19. I LOVE these photos!! Thank you! Can you tell us where that giant rock formation is jutting up from the water? Looks familiar. Cheers!

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  20. Oh, for the days of messing around in (on?) a Sunfish. (Or its cousin, a Sailfish.)

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  21. Love the picture of the kids diving and swimming. It looks like the Pemaquid River at Bristol Mills where locals proudly refurbished a fish ladder for alewives and re-dedicated it last week.

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  22. Great photos and not a Range Rover in sight.

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  23. Is that the Bristol dam swimming hole? About ten years ago one of my sons famously got washed over the edge of the dam (under the fence) but some kid was quick and grabbed his hand and pulled him back up...phew! I love all these photos...essence of Maine for me and love how so little has changed.

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    1. Goodness! Yes, it is. I used to swim there when I was little (pre-fence) but would never do it now. Too scary.

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