Photo by Salt Water New England

Sunday, September 13, 2020

Spot Waxing the Barbour

13 comments:

  1. Thank you for the informative demo! I own an Australian Duster that needs a refresh so your video is very helpful.

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    1. I have one, too, from Morrison's. My mother brought back 5(!) one year from Australia. It's amazing.

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  2. Just purchased my first Barbour, and got it second hand for a fair price. However, since I don’t know the level of care/frequency of rewaxing it previously received, I am wondering if anyone can advise how I should decide when to wax it? Thanks in advance!

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    1. Hi, I’ve gotten two barbours under similar circumstances (one from a street market in London, one on eBay). I think you can make this determination in one of two ways. First, if the jacket is not longer beading up water then it would benefit from reproofing. Second, if the fabric starts to look “dry” or no longer has a slight sheen, then it may be time to reproof. The funny thing with barbours is that the wax in integral to the durability of the fabric—it lubricates the surface and prevents thorns and rough objects from damaging the face fabric. So a good waxing preserves as well as waterproofs. For me, I sent both of my second-hand barbours in for a factory rewax to get a clean slate, and partially because both needed repair. Whether you send the jacket out for professional rewaxing is up to you. The process is expensive, but a guy at Orvis says they melt out the old wax and rewax from scratch, so depending on condition this could be worth it. Factory rewaxing could also take a while in the fall (their busy season). To conclude, if it were me, I would see if the jacket looks dry and is letting water soak in. If it is, and the jacket isn’t too soiled, I would rewax myself. If the jacket needs a lot of love (and you want it returned to factory finish, rather than keeping the wear), I would probably enjoy it if you can for the winter and send it in come spring, otherwise it might be “in the shop” for a month or two when you’d rather by wearing it. Congrats on the new jacket, they quickly become a trusted friend.

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  3. I've found over the decades that less is better , when it comes to re-waxing . It's easy to get carried away and end up with a right mess of too much ( and near on impossible to remove .. ) wax that comes off on everything it contacts . More annoying is the bleed through to the cotton lining , which stains .Just do the shoulders to start with ; ease into the game ;-) Enjoy , and don't leave it on a train/bus/plane as I've done to five so far ( mentioned this before on SWNE ) . LOL !

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  4. Although rather than a Barbour, I have a Filson cover cloth jacket, and everything here applies. The wax does indeed come off on other things, in my case, the seat back in the car. But it's not noticeable on the car seat. Mostly the wax has rubbed off from the lower back but I have only troubled myself to re-wax across the shoulders, where most of the rain lands. My only advice is to do your best not to get any of the wax on the collar.

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  5. Great video! That little bit of care, goes a long way! Thanks so very much!

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  6. I have a tin of dressing downstairs, my jacket is due. Only difference from your method is that I blow dry the fabric immediately before applying. I touch it up every few years and agree with a comment above that less is better.

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  7. I typically wait until our jackets are quite "dry" before I re-wax. I work the wax in as thoroughly as possible with a cotton rag, then warm the jackets all over with a hair dryer and rub any excess wax off, and then hang overnight to dry. The next day I'll give them another rub with a clean cotton rag to remove any remaining excess wax (repeating the hair dryer if I have gone overboard!). Like polishing silver, it is an oddly meditative and satisfying chore.

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  8. A Barbour is your workhorse and will perform required tasks for years when maintained properly. Love me my Boarder!

    Spot waxing, as illustrated, may be necessary on occasion. However, to re-wax a full jacket on your own can be quite challenging. Plus deafening, dang the roar of that dryer.

    For short money your local Orvis store will send it to Barbour. You can use Barbour.com as well. Complete instructions are there for the whole process, plus extensive info on taking care of your jackets. They can make the most tattered, and unkempt jacket look, sort of, new.

    Note:
    A heated car seat and a properly waxed Barbour do not make for good neighbors.
    Barbour does Barbour only. New England Wax Proofing will do a good job on other manufactured items.


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  9. I have one old Barbour Bedale in sage green that is probably overdue for a waxing, but I am not as brave as Muffy is, and there is also that blasted bleeding-through potential to the cotton lining if one isn't careful. I have 2 'newer' (meaning a decade old) Barbour jackets of which one is a Sylkoil wax Beadnell, and doesn't need anything doing to; the other is a Carter wool hunting/stalking jacket that doesn't mind getting a bit of rain on it and is the most comfortable to wear, in my opinion. The one thing that puts me off about the wax cotton jackets is that they don't keep me particularly warm, so layers underneath are important, and since the inner sleeves are nylon and don't breathe, they make me perspire profusely. What I like about almost all Barbour jackets (at least the more 'trad' models) are the huge bellows pockets.

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  10. Thanks for reminding me to re-wax my Beaufort. On that note, someone should send this link to Mr. Steve Bannon as well, an avid fan of Barbour.

    I love the factory finish look of a re-waxed Barbour but I also like the weathered aesthetics and patina without the wax. This jacket was intended for the English countryside but it's also a classic for Gothic campus quads and New England towns.

    I would not go as far as to say the Barbour is our varsity jacket but it's certainly not whale-embroidered pull-overs. At least, I hope not.

    The jacket is sufficient on its own. I rarely use the vest liner and button-in hood -- that's probably more for the PTA crowd. I wear it with an old Shaggy Dog, Quoddy Blucher's or Danner Mountain Light, chinos and when appropriate, Barbour scarf. Sadly, Darn Tough socks has replaced Bean Ragg Wool socks as its more comfortable and durable. Bean just isn't the same anymore.

    Would love to see more videos Muffy.





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  11. Thank you Muffy. I have been following your site since the TDP days and this was the first time I have heard you speak. Just lovely. I hope you will include more videos. GLH

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