Photo by Salt Water New England

Monday, April 13, 2020

Wood Shingles

Photos by Salt Water New England
A sine qua non of Salt Water New England architecture is wood shingles, and Fenwick, Connecticut is an ideal place to see why.












14 comments:

  1. Just so very perfect. Thank you for everything you do for us all!!

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  2. When they were first adopted they were the least expensive of ways to weathershield houses and roofs. Now, except for slate, the most expensive in terms of purchase, labor and maintenance.

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  3. All I have to do is see a shingled house and I think of New England. (Wish I knew how to make a heart on this blog.) Thanks!

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  4. Interesting that while those homes all have cedar siding, a number of them appear to have asphalt shingle roofs. We just replaced our cedar shake roof in the DC metro area with asphalt. Cedar shakes look better - weathers from the caramel cedar color to silver over time. Cedar roofs suffer in very humid environments like swampy DC and cost twice as much as composite/asphalt. We still have cedar shingles for the siding on the rear side of the house. The siding has withstood the weather much better than the roof.

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  5. Cedar Shake doesn't seem to have a place in the south. You hardly ever see them Florida and Texas. I love our visits to New England and Long Island. So many beautiful Cedar Shake houses.

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    1. They're beautiful, but a nightmarish fire hazard. Since we hate asphalt shingles--which don't last well anyway and don't perform well in hurricanes--we went with standing-seam metal.

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  6. Here in England, they build almost exclusively with brick and stone. There hasn't been enough wood for building in centuries. I prefer wood any day, despite the upkeep. So much warmer and more attractive.

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  7. Wooden shingles, whether on a roof or as siding, require maintenance and a humid climate. New England, inland as well as coastal, fits the requirement. But if you take the material to a region where it doesn't get periodically drenched, there will be problems with durability.

    Counterexample: Tile roofs, as found all across the south and southwest, are adaptive for those climates. Yet even so people sometimes use wood there, thus setting themselves up for continual maintenance issues.

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  8. Beautiful, and only gets better with age.

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  9. I'd love to quarantine in one of those mansions...

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  10. They look enormous to me, but to each their own I guess.

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  11. You’re right. They are enormous “cottages.”

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