Photo by Salt Water New England

Saturday, April 4, 2020

The New Normal

Photo by Salt Water New England

35 comments:

  1. Never in my life did I imagine something like this would become a reality...

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  2. How long is this going to be our “normal”?

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    1. Probably until somewhere around June 1st, based on this graph which is the one being studied at the highest level:

      https://covid19.healthdata.org/projections

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    2. While I’m glad someone is studying the graph, on the evidence I’d feel much better if we knew who “the highest level” represents. First, disregard anyone with the prefix “Acting.” Discard from consideration any utterance from anyone lacking a doctorate in epidemiology, biochemistry, medicine, or related fields. This should considerably reduce the noise and allow for thoughtful consideration and appropriate planning and action. This will be a not inconsiderable challenge. Good luck.

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    3. My city extended its State of Emergency until June 30th. All parks and recreational facilities are closed until then. I’m hoping we start easing up with restrictions by the end of the month. We’ve been in quarantine for a month and I don’t know how much longer I can take it.

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  3. nothing about this normal. 34 thousand flu deaths last year, maybe this will match or exceed it somewhat, but not enough people are asking why is the world closed.

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    1. After conferring with A-Rod and J-lo, the Leader of the Free World said this the way it should be.

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    2. Are you really questioning the reason for the shutdown even if the number of deaths don't end up exceeding the number from the flu?

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    3. The world is closed because there is a pandemic. There is no treatment or cure. Until there is a vaccine, this is in varying degrees, will be the new normal. The world must learn to live with the virus.
      virus.

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  4. Robert ReichardtApril 4, 2020 at 7:53 PM

    This new “normal” won’t last long in my opinion. Covid19 is obviously very dangerous and remarkably contagious, but is it worth destroying civilization over it?

    As we all know, right now Americans are patiently following the CDC/NIH guidelines with everything shut-down, but this hermetic situation can’t go on indefinitely before people just decide to take their chances, and re-start living. Enough is enough.

    That leads us to the big question -- what would happen tomorrow if everyone suddenly resumed their everyday pre-pandemic lives? What would this “Damn the torpedoes – I don’t care anymore, I’m going back to work and reopening my business, etc.” attitude lead to? Exponentially more deaths, or just about the same percentage number if this disease was simply allowing to pass through? Nobody knows for sure, but it certainly would be worse if no temporary mitigation was implemented.

    Interestingly, as someone mentioned, last year our country saw 46,000 deaths from the garden-variety flu alone – so in comparison -- at this point -- the Wuhan Virus numbers seem statistically manageable – unless there’s an unforeseen explosion. And after all, we’re not dealing with Ebola, or even the Spanish Flu here. (For example, yesterday I heard Governor Cuomo say that over 8,000 virus patients were treated and released from NYC hospitals – now if they all had Ebola with its 83% - 90% mortality rate -- such a reassuring scenario would be impossible. And from recent reports, about 80% of the Coronavirus infected recover, and only a tiny fraction end up in intensive care, or tragically dying.)

    In any war one expects battle casualties, and so far we’re seeing tens of thousands – not the dreaded millions. But how many deaths are we prepared to accept to achieve victory over this invisible enemy before we can get on with our lives again? Thankfully, we are being led by competent Generals who want to err on the side of caution to reduce the number of casualties to a minimum. And the conflict seems to be entering its critical stage, so we’ll know shortly which way to go. One thing is certain – something’s got to give.

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    1. What competent Generals?
      Have you seen the hospitals in NY/Italy/Spain/Wuhan, "a tiny fraction" are tens of thousands of people in ICU's all at the same time.
      Civilization has not been destroyed. This new normal in varying degrees will be with us well into the future.

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    2. Anonymous April 5, 2020 at 9:11 AM:

      Next time, please read what I wrote. Thanks.

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    3. Two thoughts come to mind:

      First, I wonder what Forest Gump would say about this.
      Second, let's see how well this ages.

      Aiken

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    4. The competent Generals are two. Both are from New York City. One went to Archbishop Molloy. The other went to Regis.

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    5. Anonymous April 5, 2020 at 9:10 PM;

      No, there are actually three competent Generals from New York City, with the best one being from the New York Military Academy, and the Ivy League (Penn, BS in Economics). Thanks.

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  5. I can't believe these so-called adults whining about not being allowed to go outside and play. Didn't you people ever live in your houses before, or did you just use them for sleeping? Why not learn to enjoy the pleasure of staying at home? Don't you have books and access to music?

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    1. No, some people don't. Or access to food. Or technology. The single out-of-work parent in a one bedroom apartment with 2 or 3 children might not enjoy the "pleasure of staying at home."

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  6. The beach sign should read,"five or fewer,"not less...

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    1. Ha! Only on SWNE. Love this response.
      MaryAnne

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    2. I tried to hold it in. Thank you for saying what was on many of our minds.

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  7. from what I gather some surfers in California were reprimanded and told to stay out of the water and off the beach .

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  8. Don't forget in the beginning Trump in his infinite wisdom said it was all a hoax...

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  9. I realize social distancing is boring and cabin fever is setting in HOWEVER it is the best way right now to Flatten the Curve and not overwhelm the medical personnel — I particularly appreciate everyone’s efforts as my 23 yo old daughter is a RN at a major hospital in Washington, DC on the frontline of this pandemic — she was in the cardiac unit but now she and all the other nurses from "elective" units are being pulled and retrained to work in the ER so PLEASE stay home and be safe — remember it’s YOUR BEHAVIOR that might help save someone you love.

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  10. I was hesitant to comment because I'm very comfortable relaxing here at home and I do realize there are those out there who are ill, are missing paychecks and are unable to visit their relatives, etc. But I wish people would take a look at history and realize that this is not the worse thing people have had to go through and stop acting like it's the end of the world if they can't get their roots touched up or if the market is out of their favorite ice cream.

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  11. Nobody calling around here has it's advantages : all the ice cold Bollinger for my wife and myself ......... It's amazing how many people can be very thirsty when you open a bottle of something decent .

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  12. I have long studied hermits and solitaries and since I no longer belong to any clubs or team-type activities, all of this stay-at-home business seems perfectly normal to me. My day has arrived. There are still a few religious solitaries in the world and it is ironic that some of them have blogs. They're nowhere near as active as SWNE, however.

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  13. A New Yorker dispatch from Italy, published yesterday, discusses what Italians have learned form the coronavirus experience:

    "This is probably the most significant change in habit that this coronavirus mess has brought among Italians. We listen to facts now, not to opinions. We listen to people who have something meaningful to say. There is less room for the proud ignorance of those who believe that what they already know is all they need to understand ... This crisis has [also] caused a shift in mindset, which is where I find some hope. Where many of us in the past have felt justified in trying to escape the rules, we now feel an urgency to join together in following them." Marco Malvaldi, April 5, 2020.

    The wise learn from others' experience; the unwise hold onto their predispositions. Let's hope we are wise ones.

    Aiken

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    1. Facts matter! Thank goodness people are starting to recognize that.

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    2. Again, Aiken, your comments are spot-on. I enjoy reading them. I was just thinking yesterday about what we all will have learned when this is over, and the Italians nailed it!

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    3. "There is less room for the proud ignorance of those who believe that what they already know is all they need to understand ... " AMEN

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  14. the new temporary normal, perhaps. None of the younger generations of Americans have lived through a truly widespread and devastating disease like the 1918 H1N1 flu, or anything like the Great Depression. We're going to need some time for employment to recover and to figure out better ways to address this new virus, but we're much better equipped to deal with this today. More people can work from home, our health care options are generally better, and it's a lot easier to reach a large population with stay at home orders and the like. Still, our efforts to test for and contain this virus have been embarrassing for an otherwise developed country, and we'll hopefully learn from that.

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  15. I think people are going to embrace aspects of the "New Normal." Why spend 3 hours a day cursing the traffic on the Merritt Parkway or dodging germs and crazies on the train if you can push pixels from your OWN desk rather than commute to that cubicle?
    Companies will realize they don't need to heat/cool/pay taxes on so much office space.

    Parents are also getting a good look at what their kids are actually being taught; and have an opportunity unique to our time to actually spend enough time with their kids to inculcate their values, maybe even those of their parents and grand-parents as well as pass down family history and stories. Also an opportunity to teach pride and acceptance of American history, the good the bad AND the ugly, instead of just downloading Alinsky and Zinn grievance culture into our kids.

    Teach them how to grow a garden, tend chickens, read for enjoyment instead of as an academic chore. One thing I find amazing is how the "screens generation" about whom everyone was lamenting the lack of personal real-time contact, suddenly can't live without being out and about together! What irony.

    Personally, I'll probably never set foot in a supermarket again now that I've experienced the back-to-the-future civility of Peapod and Instacart. Tip your delivery friends well! :-)

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