Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Scratchy Photos from the 80s - My Husband's Childhood Home, Weston, Massachusetts

Photos by Salt Water New England



















30 comments:

  1. I'm sorry.
    Love the cat though.

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    1. Have to agree; mid-century modern does nothing for me; too cold, no character.

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    2. I like some of them. I remember vividly a couple in my hometown. One proudly advertised that it was an all-electric home when it was under construction. The other, appropriately, was owned by a doctor and his wife, who was my art teacher in high school.

      The most famous of all (to me, at least) is Philip Johnson's Glass House in Connecticut.

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  2. Our cat looks exactly like this! I actually like abstract art even thought I paint mostly realistic subjects. I can appreciate the clean aesthetic of modernism but I just would not want to live in that type of house. As a southerner I prefer high ceilings, a wrap around front porch with a swing on it and wide plank wooden floors.

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  3. All the more reason to watch THE ICE STORM...

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  4. Lovely mid-century house and art. Weston, MA is hard to argue with. Yes, mid-century modern is not traditional New England, but it has its own appeal. Clean lines, bright and airy (often), sometimes high ceilings, modern efficiencies and conveniences, and designed for the way most people live today. We live in a "Swiss Miss" (Google it) house in Palm Springs, which is one of the centers of everything mid-century modern (amidst a host of faux Spanish/Mediterranean houses), and love it (as do many others who keep paying more and more for these and similar houses). While traditional houses certainly have their own attractions, folks not familiar with mid-century modern should not be so quick to dismiss it. As for mid-century modern houses being "cold," that's only in the winter. (Yes, we have a winter out here, which is roughly akin to what passes for spring in New England.)

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  5. WHO LEFT THE SHOPPING LIST ON THE KITCHEN ISLAND? GET IT OFF OF THERE!

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    1. Not the point, young lady, and you know it. Now put them away. (wink)
      By the way, good design always holds up, whether 300 years old or 50 years old. There is a certain amount of self discipline necessarily learned when living in such houses.

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    2. I was baking a cobbler for you....your favorite!

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  6. Except for the steps inside (I'm a bit clumsy) I like the clean lines and the flow. You can furnish traditional, modern, exotic or a mix and it can still fit in.

    NCJack

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  7. Even if this isn’t your aesthetic as some have expressed, it is so 80’s artsy household! similar to much of what I grew up with in upstate NY/ And NYC. Thank you for posting. I always appreciate those snapshots in time and their context. And I love he cat.

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  8. Muffy , Is this still the same or has it been redeveloped ?

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  9. I am an architect so I am biased but buildings that speak to the time in which they were built always resonate with me. This is a beautiful example and was obviously loved by the family.

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  10. Muffy,
    You state that the photos were from the Eighties; when was the house built? I'd be curious to know who the architect was.

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  11. Wonderful, highly sophisticated -- I almost expected to see Walter Gropius sitting in the living room talking to Mies van der Rohe.

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  12. Timeless style. Thanks so very much for the photos!

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  13. Fabulous pictures. I love ultra modern architecture despite my predilection for 17th and 18th century colonial houses. Maybe the bareness of early styles is an aesthetic also found in clean modern lines. Who knows? I am curious whether these pictures were scanned from prints or slides. I admire the quality of the light and the colors in your transiting these images from early media to digital media. With thousands of slides to scan--both mine and my Dad's, I would love some hints on the best equipment and best methods to use.

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  14. Try plopping that previous post sero shirt down anywhere in this house..

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  15. Dave's comment made me choke on my coffee.

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  16. My wife has cousins who live in Weston, Wayland and Wellesley . All three have beautiful architecture .

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  17. I loved this home. and that kitty face. even though I'm a dog lover by heart.
    I like the open space and the uncluttered simplicity of it. but then I live in a hot climate. I honestly think that has a lot to do with it. thanks for the tour!

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  18. Replies
    1. Of course. What’s a cat for, if not part of the decor?

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  19. Very cool. Not my style personally, but I respect it.

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  20. The vey handsome cat looks like he/she might have been quite a character.

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  21. The architecture is likely part of the Early American Modernist/Gropius/Bauhaus influence adopted by architects in some suburbs outside Boston. For example, I grew up in the Adams-designed Gaskill house mentioned here, much less attractive than your husband's: https://www.oldhouseonline.com/web-exclusives/early-modern-architecture-in-lincoln-massachusetts

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  22. I would love to see this home with Frank Lloyd Wright’s warm woods rather than the sterile whites and grays. A nice example of the era, though.

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  23. Oh my, what my dreams are made of! I read a few comments stating that they aren’t fans of MCM interiors so I may be in the minority on this one but this is stunning. I know many people feel it’s cold and sterile but to me it’s inviting and calming. Can’t imagine how it must have felt to grow up in such a space. Do you have any details on the art work featured? I wish there were more photos to see! On a random note, thank you for always sharing such wonderful content with us. It’s truly a pleasure going through your blog ... so tired of the none-sense ‘glamour’ Instagram life that’s constantly being pushed by my peers.

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