Photo by Salt Water New England

Sunday, February 23, 2020

All Good Things...

Photo by Salt Water New England

28 comments:

  1. It's actually all things ... good, bad and indifferent. Kind of amazing when you think about it.

    Aiken

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  2. I have never had an all-cotton Oxford cloth shirt wear out at the collar or cuffs, no matter how long I wear them.
    Are American washing machines and/or detergents made to treat clothes harshly?

    Bostonian Abroad

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    1. Bostonian,
      Nobody seems to have answered your question. My guess is that it's a combination of harsh detergents and the fact that Americans overload their washing machines. Plus, Europeans are wise enough not to wash jeans and Oxford cloth shirts together; it's like washing the shirts together with sandpaper.

      Expat Trad

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  3. That shirt still has years of worthy service left to give as a yard work, painting, and fishing shirt, not to mention just tucking away on the boat for an unexpected chill, or to keep the sun off. But then, wives are always throwing out our best stuff as soon as we break it in [wink].

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  4. Johnson Brothers plate?

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  5. FJW

    I can't add anything to Dave's comment except I recently retired and shirts like that are getting worn more often.

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  6. It is indeed a shame when oxford cloth shirts reach this point. Still extremely comfortable around the house for all sorts of chores, as noted above, but sadly no longer really up to snuff for dressier attire during the workweek or an evening out. I've got a few blue ones like this that are ideal for summertime mowing and related yard work however.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

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  7. Sero made great shirts! I wore them through the '60s and into the '70s. My favorite shirt manufacturer at the time. I still have one that I purchased from Eljo's in Charlottesville around 1974 that I keep as a reminder of those days.

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  8. OK, this may seem way off, but seeing that frayed shirt really struck a nerve. Obviously, it has been much loved and now it's time to be repurposed. Alas, I had to give up my beloved 21-year-old Subaru Forester this weekend and buy a new one. Tore me up! You can laugh if you like, but there are a few things I really get attached to and keep until they are no longer safe or smart to wear/use/drive. But, as they say, life is a constant series of closing one door and opening another. Still . . . . so sad.

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    1. Bravo Susan. You're displaying what so many of us were taught which is good old fashioned "Yankee thrift."

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    2. Susan, I know exactly how you felt. I cried when I had to get rid of my old Subaru too because it still had the nose prints on the back windows from my beloved dogs that had passed the year before! I never cleaned the windows! I was sobbing at the dealership and I'm sure everyone thought I was nuts. I know it may seem silly to some but I also cried when my husband and I had to dispose of our ancient '70s TV in the landfill. It looked so alone, sitting there with no more purpose, no one to cherish it. We had such fond memories of carrying that monster up to my apartment ( almost killed us) and watching Carson together every night when we were in school. We do adapt with change and I'm so grateful that I can keep the memories alive even though I can't keep the 'thing'. When the day comes that I can no longer remember, well, I guess it won't matter anyway.

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    3. This is getting to be a little like the scene in “Sleepless in Seattle” where they are discussing “An Affair to Remember” and “The Dirty Dozen”.

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  9. looks good to me, plenty of years left.

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  10. I'm glad to know that I am not the only guy who keeps shirts until get into that condition. Just because a shirt is no longer appropriate to wear to work or a religious or social event (or, arguably, anywhere else in public) does not mean that it is ready for the trash bin.

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  11. You could maybe turn the collar and get a little more wear out of it.

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    1. One of the shops in New Haven used to offer this service. I forget if it was J Press or maybe Rosenberg's next door (maybe it was both). You could get a collar reversed for $1.00 or $1.50.

      That Sero shirt looks like it was worn during a vampire attack. Not sure they would have fixed those neck holes.

      Aiken

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  12. Plenty of years left!!

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  13. As I responded above to one commenter, this to me is a display not of penuriousness but instead what my grandparents and parents have always taught me, which is good old Yankee thrift. Any true New Englander knows exactly what I mean...

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  14. And I do have to say in response to an earlier post comment where one individual snarkily compared Subarus (which I LOVE and which my family has driven for decades) to Yugos, clearly he is coming from a newer kind set of values than those on which I was raised. Guess it's all about the bling for some!

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    1. I felt the same way. Loved my Subaru.
      MaryAnne

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    2. ML:

      Yes, I’m the low snark who had the gall to compare your beloved Subarus to Yugos, but I believe you misunderstood what I meant.

      Now, the original question was why doesn’t Muffy ever take pictures of Subarus?

      The reason is obvious – her photos of automobiles (and thankfully much besides) are based upon aesthetic principles – how beautiful the object is, and how it delights the eye. Let’s face it, classic Rolls Royces, Porsches, vintage MGs, BMWs, Mercedes and Aston-Martins simply look a lot better than any Subaru (or Yugo). Imagine the suave James Bond speeding recklessly around in a Subaru. Funny, right? This isn’t to say that Subarus aren’t fine cars (satisfied with that all you irate Subaru fans?), but just that they are built and designed for their function – not their appearance. It’s hard to take a good photo of a car’s utility that is of any interest to anyone. I know people who own Subarus, but I’ve never heard any of them gush about good-looking they are.

      Anyway, perhaps I went a little too far in my auto brand comparison to drive my point across, but if you like, as soon as I get my Yugo out of the shop, I’d be happy to give you a ride. Please let me know.

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    3. I appreciate all the mouth-watering photos of Land-Rovers that she posts and I still have hopes for a photo of a Rover 2000 or 3500.

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    4. Robert, thanks for your reply and points well taken! Your humor is a nice touch too. Fwiw, I was an Audi owner for many years but reluctantly decided to turn it in not long ago for a more practical Forester since it was getting a little too banged up when driving my now teenage daughter and her teammates around with their lacrosse gear and dirty cleats. As I write this I muse, "Just who is perhaps a too sensitive now?" :-)

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  15. Collars, cuffs and plackets are more comfortable (in my view) without linings, and definitely more durable. Shirts wear a lot more at the edges of interlinings. Some fabrics are so light that going without a lining will make the collar look rumpled. Still, you wear them long enough, they don't look very presentable.

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  16. My mother used to turn the collar on my Books Brothers shirts.

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  17. I have turned many a collar for the sake of saving a shirt, and, yes, Yankee thrift!

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  18. This brings a tear to my eye because my first OCBD was a Sero purchased in 1980 when I was a sophomore in prep school. I actually still have one left that I wear very sparingly to preserve my youth. At 40 years old, I think I got my (parent's) money's worth.

    RIP Sero...

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