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Friday, January 3, 2020

Wisconsin State Journal: Lands' End sued by Delta Air Lines employees who claim uniforms cause health problems



From the Wisconsin State Journal:
Two class-action lawsuits... claim the uniforms [manufactured by Lands' End] caused numerous Delta employees to break out in skin rashes, suffer migraines and experience breathing difficulties, among other problems. 
They claim that the chemicals and finishes used to create high-stretch, wrinkle- and stain-resistant, waterproof, anti-static and deodorizing garments for the uniforms led to employees' health problems.... 
[T]he lawsuits claim more than 1,900 have complained of adverse affects.... Monica DeCrescentis, a Delta flight attendant from New York, has had skin reactions, headaches and a low white blood cell count while being required to wear the uniform. It also claims the uniform has permanently stained items it came in contact with, including sheets, towels and her bathtub... 
Other injuries that employees claim started after the uniforms were introduced include severe respiratory distress, contact dermatitis, blisters, boils, hives, nosebleeds, ringing ears, muscle weakness, swollen lymph nodes and auto-immune conditions. 
- Wisconsin State Journal <https://madison.com/wsj/business/lands-end-sued-by-delta-air-lines-employees-who-claim/article_1acba5c3-59fa-5232-a388-97583008e6e2.html

   

18 comments:

  1. I confess that Delta and Land's End strike me as a perfect marriage made in hell. Thank God they can't have children.

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  2. Should have bought their clothes from the advertisers on this site with our Moderator's guidance.

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    1. You haven't compared the prices of Lands' End goods with the prices of advertisers on this site. The prices would be relevant to all but a very small segment of the population.

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  3. "Testing of the employees’ uniforms found several heavy metals and chemicals present above safe levels, including mercury, formaldehyde, fluorine and chromium, the lawsuit claims."

    This is rather remarkable. Rather than tried and true laundering, someone came up with the bright idea of adding chemicals to counteract what washing easily removes. We see the same thing in the food industry. What a misapplication of science.

    Aiken

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  4. Back when LE first came out with stylish, women’s no iron shirts, I went all in and ordered a bunch, thinking it a great purchase for work.

    Big mistake. The fabric treatment gave me a terrible rash around my neck and everywhere the fabric rubbed against my skin.

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  5. Not surprised. And I bet you every single item was made in China. When we order anything from LE or Bean we ask first where the item was made. Hard to find anything from either that is not made there. No quality control, No thanks.

    I just bought some non-iron, all-cotton dress shirts at Brooks during their January sale and the sales person told me to wash them a few times before wearing in order to reduce chemicals. They were made in Malaysia. According to the tags...

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    1. Location of manufacture does not equal chemicals or shoddy product. Had the clothing been made in the US, there would be just as many chemicals, but three times more expensive to produce. Companies contract for exactly what they want. Tying certain countries to shoddy product is a false linkage and perpetuates a subtle discrimination. Place the blame where it belongs: at the feet of the American companies.

      Aiken

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    2. I make every effort possible to avoid anything labeled ' no iron' or items that contain spandex/Lycra which makes purchasing new clothing a challenge. It's been known for many years that these plastics and fabric treatments are toxic- including dry cleaning solvents.
      Fabric softeners are also toxic and last year Subaru owners had to be cautious about wearing beauty products and clothing treated with fabric softener because the gases caused the break lights to quit working. " According to the company, consumer products containing silicone -- like shampoo, fabric softener or nail polish -- can emit a gas that can seep into the brake lamp switch and cut off the electrical contact". Off-gassing from clothing or other items in our homes, offices and autos expose us to a constant stream of toxic compounds. That wonderful ' new car' smell that everyone enjoys is deadly.

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    3. I agree with Aiken. If they really wanted to, they could station a full time American, or person of another other nationality for that matter in the factory to supervise production and help with the QC process. While there are many factory owners around the world that are devious and cunning, the onus is on the brand to find a factory that is aligned with their values and provides them with the products that meet their standards. Grant Stone, a GYW shoe producer that makes their shoes in a factory in Xiamen, China, is a great example of this.

      People, in general, would do the minimum necessary to earn their wage particularly if there isn't a benefit to doing it well. Brands stopped caring, so why would the factory owners invest more time and money when the person that they are selling it to doesn't give two shits about it.

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  6. I have been a Lands End customer from day one and have never had an issue of any type.

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  7. I worked for a major American airline for 23 years.
    When I first started in the late 80's, our uniforms were lined and made of good fabrics.
    When I was outsourced in 2012, my uniform was giving me a rash.
    Having ditched the daily uniform, no more rash, go figure.
    I believe this lawsuit 100 percent.

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  8. I absolutely believe this. Brooks still makes Oxfords in 100% cotton, and they are sewn in the US (of imported fabric). And, the chest pocket is back. Unfortunately, it is impossible to find pants that don’t have some kind of spandex or non-iron chemical applied to them. Hoping my current stock lasts until these lawsuits become more prevalent and manufacturers go back to 100% cotton. I could be waiting a while!

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    1. I'm pretty sure my stock of clothes will last until I kick the bucket. That is, provided my sizes don't change.

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    2. You must not have kids or dogs. Some stains won’t come out.

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  9. Call me a textile snob, but with the exception of outerwear, if it's not cotton, silk, linen, or wool, I won't wear it. There is no reason anybody's clothing should be unhealthy. Except when absolutely not possible, everything is laundered here at home. --Holly

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  10. None of these issues ever come up with second-hand clothes.

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