Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

In the New York Times Newsroom, 1960s

Photo by My Father

8 comments:

  1. Timeless! Thank you.

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  2. I can't remember the last time I saw this combo: vest with pen in pocket, OCBD, bow-tie & pipe.

    While I don't wear vests, bow-ties or smoke a pipe, I would trust this fellow in reporting the news. When I look at this 50 year-old photo, I realize how far we've drifted with respect to, inter alia, the news media in this country. I sure would like to have a whole army of these folks reporting the news today.

    Aiken

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  3. I enjoy it when you post some of your father's photos. It seems that the dress is more thought out, kind of like people really thought about what they were putting on.

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  4. Those were the days! Journalists were more objective and ~ well ~ better in my opinion. (Hope nobody jumps down my throat.)

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    Replies
    1. Journalists are still objective. People just don't like what they report unless it lines up with their view of reality. The term "alternate facts" was coined by, and for, those people.

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    2. Susan are you Mrs. Maddow?

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    3. Just a former journalist. :-)

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  5. Susan! Wouldn't dream of jumping down your throat. The business of news is -- well, honestly, not something I understand very well. Different from when we were young, no? Is it safe to say that it exists in a more crowded and competitive landscape? For what it may be worth to you, I've found it helpful, in plowing through news sources, to bear in mind distinctions that were explained to me by two kind friends -- one a political science major and the other a Peabody Award winner (I know -- lucky!): There's the journal-of-record kind of reporting, i.e., events as they unfold and data as they emerge; there's analysis, i.e., an honest attempt to suspend personal biases while assembling facts that expose a sound perspective, or uncover something of note; there are editorials and opinions, which are, with hope, grounded in facts and meant to be persuasive; and then there's entertainment news, which is easily consumable, high on foment (sigh), low on fact. " [...] grant me the wisdom to know the difference." It niggles at me that I was taught these distinctions in high school, but my mind was elsewhere ...

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