Photo by Salt Water New England

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

A Drizzly Day Around Yale

Photos by Salt Water New England














































































































21 comments:

  1. Ahh just so! Thanks so very much.

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  2. Rainy days in New Haven are a delight. There are so many good opportunities for indoor adventures. When I first saw Wiley’s portrait of Yiadom-Boakye, I was reminded of what Alan Watts once said of God, “She’s a black female.” Art probing the integrity of tightly held cultural values.

    Aiken

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    1. One could say it probesthe integrity of cultural values,or one could say its a childish fantasy of power,much like dressing as batman. Just depends on your point of view.

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  3. As my late maternal grandmother used to say occasionally and without a hint of the derision, irony, and sarcasm now so ubiquitous, "What a pretty day!" Looks like a fun way to spend it (museums and people watching). That last shot really looks like State Street in Madison.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

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    1. "Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather." - John Ruskin

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  4. On a break from my chores this morning, I took a brief tour of Yale. Thank you. It was delightful!

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  5. Thanks for the tour - quite enjoyable. Love rainy days. There was a time when it seemed that college guys could add a tie and in most cases be acceptably dressed for the workplace but colleges campus dress changed and the workplace didn’t move as quickly so there was a rather lengthy period of incongruity but for the past several years, campus dress and the workplace seem to have again been in harmony. I enjoy seeing what the students are wearing and find they look much like our grandkids who are 1,000 or more miles away.

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  6. Enjoyed this very much, thank you.

    -CC

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  7. That Wiley portrait of Yiadom-Boakye is FANTASTIC!!! I must see it in person.

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    1. Could be, but the label, I suspect, has an error that's probably typical for today's museum label-writers, who care greatly about "intersectionality" but can't get the firearms right. (This actually reassures me.)

      The painting is fuzzy on details, but I'd bet anything that's a shotgun she's holding, not a rifle.

      Shooting hares/rabbits — she's bagged four in the painting — would have been done in the 18th century with a "gun," which in the context of the period would mean a shotgun, not a rifle. (See any of the episodes of Downton Abbey with grouse hunting in them.)

      Rifles in the 18th century were expensive, very slow to load for follow-up shots, and consequently field hunters carried side-by-side or over-and-under shotties, giving the hunter two blasts at the target. Or, if carrying single-shot models, there was the loader standing behind conveniently ready to hand a reloaded gun to the shooter.

      Just another factual flub from an academic of today, who is likely left "literally shaking" by the thought of firearms. OK, that's perhaps unfair here — but as I said above, all too typical.

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    2. Looks more like a rifle to me, perhaps a Martini-Henry. A .22 is a perfectly appropriate weapon for shooting rabbits. Shotguns were called fowling pieces in the 18th century, when there were no .22 rifles. Strange painting.

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    3. How much would you like to bet the painting isn't even remotely about the style of gun or the rabbits? But, you know, boys.

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    4. Is anyone else exhausted by the incessant drumming that everyone who lived prior to today was inherently bad and we all carry scars of their vices? Maybe they will all rise from the dead with mea culpas for living life as it was then, and not by today's standards. (Do we even have standards anymore?)

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    5. I hear the drums of progress. You might get your hearing checked.

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    6. To anon @ 7:31 am- There is fantasy, and then there is reality. Indulge in fantasy all you want, but don't spend too much time believing that it is reality.

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    7. Dearest Anonymous November 10, 2019 at 11:24 AM,
      is the glass half full?
      Half empty?
      Or... refillable?

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    8. to Anonymous November 6, 2019 at 8:23 PM, as the info on the wall states-
      this is created-the year of 2017 oil on canvas..."based" on works.

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  8. Thank you. A most pleasant detour. I miss my days at the University of Chicago when every day was as stimulating as the last. There was no such thing as a drizzly day. There were too many things to learn and too many thought provoking conversations to be had. I miss being bombarded with new and exciting ideas and to be in a constant learning mode.

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  9. I had lunch at Berkeley College a few weeks ago with a fellow there who's a graduate of the boarding school for which I work. I'd never spent much time on the campus before, but my visit really helped me to appreciate what a pretty place it is. Cheers.

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  10. As I looked at the art I wondered
    what is more important,
    reaching out to grasp the past or reaching out for the future?

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  11. Thank you for posting the tour!
    It was well enjoyed, such as all your work.

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