Photo by Salt Water New England

Monday, September 2, 2019

Honey by the Bucket

Photos by Salt Water New England
 A large bucket of fresh honey from our kind and generous farmer friends....




9 comments:

  1. Very nice color and (looks like) very good clarity. No extraneous bee parts? How is the taste? Good enough to win a blue ribbon ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's wonderful. We have it every morning on our yogurt with walnuts and blueberries. No bee parts yet.

      Delete
    2. Honey and yogurt is a nice combination.

      Delete
  2. Looks great! Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well, this explains where all the honeybees are! I've only seen 2 honey bees in my gardens this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Insects across the board are in significant decline. We noticed substantially fewer insects this summer - from mosquitoes to Monarch butterflies. Although, the bees did establish a nest in the backyard next to our composter (Muffy's design, by the way, and it works great!) and I got stung a few times, so not all the insects have gone. I didn't get any honey out of it, though.

      Habitat destruction, chemicals, and global climate change appear to be the causal factors. And, while we may say thank goodness the mosquitoes aren't biting me, we really don't want insects to become extinct. They provide enormous benefit. An entomologist friend puts it this way: No insects = no pollination. No pollination = no food. No food = no humans. Seems pretty straightforward to me.

      Aiken

      Delete
    2. Hello Aiken, I'm an extremely passionate bee-hugger as well as a great lover of nature so I hear you loud and clear! Keep educating everyone. I'm always stunned at how many people are ignorant about the honeybee crisis and other threats.

      Two years ago, I planted hundreds of Asclepias and other pollinator plants in an effort to help the Monarchs. This year it paid off. I can't believe how many butterflies, hummingbirds, songbirds and other beneficials are in my gardens! It's like a scene from a fairy tale. But , no honey bees. I have a few bumblebees and mason bees which is great but nothing like we had a few years ago. The other day I visited a friend a few miles away and he had hundreds of honey bees on his white garlic chives (Allium tuberosum). I have a few of those plants but they are such a prolific nuisance that I tend to destroy them as they come up. I may build a garden planter specifically for them and maybe that will help contain them. Lacto-fermenting the flowers is a easy and healthy way to use them and they are so yummy! I use them instead of garlic cloves. 2 years ago I purchased them from Vital Choice but then I thought I should just make my own since I make Kefir water.

      Your entomologist friend is correct but guess what? We have Monsanto who is going to save us with robot/drone pollinators, GM crops and I'm sure many more great things to come. So don't fret.
      Ugggggh. I hope I never live to see a robot bee in my garden. Oh and wait until they implement 5G in our neighborhoods. Looks like the cockroaches may inherit the earth after all. On that depressing note, I must return to my hurricane preparations. Bee hopeful and have a wonderful day!

      Delete
    3. As a treat to the bees we stopped "treating" our lawn with harmful pesticides.

      Delete
    4. ...not here in the Southwest, there are more insects than ever.

      Delete