Photo by Salt Water New England

Sunday, August 11, 2019

Question For the Community: How has the way you have exercised changed over time?

Photo by Salt Water New England

A Question for the Community:
How have the ways you have exercised changed as you aged, from teens to twenties, thirties, forties, fifties, or older?  How has participation in school sports led to other activities over the decades, if at all?

30 comments:

  1. Running just stays with you. After being a casual XC runner in high school and college, it's a habit that's engrained and one of the constants in my life even into my thirties. It's cheap (new pair of shoes once or twice a year), convenient (just walk out the door), and after a growing up in MA but moving to humidity-free Southern California, the weather's always right for it... even on hot days a dry heat breeze kicks up here in the late afternoon to keep you refreshed. It lets the mind wander, gives you that great spent feeling after, and even 20 mins of running provides a great workout. Be whistling a different tune when my knees give out perhaps, but meanwhile, can't say extoll virtues of running enough.

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  2. Used to do higher impact things like running, but in my 50s and 60s dialed it back - am 68 now and do stationary (or actual) bike, weather-permitting. Also free weights and resistance bands help keep you limber. Also as a recent retiree, regularity of getting to the Y almost daily helps bridge the gap into new preponderance of free time.

    But as time marches on and I and my cohort approach 70 and beyond, the folks I see in the best health are the ones who just... keep... moving. Have two older sisters, both fairly heavyset. The one who is an avid gardening fiend toting wheelbarrows of mulch around the yard and kneeling in the dirt eight months of the year has no health problems, while the younger one who takes no exercise has had to have hip and shoulder replacements. Your mileage may vary of course, but an anecdote that bears repeating.

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    1. "An avid gardening fiend" gave me a chuckle, as it describes me perfectly. Also, I've noted the same differences among sets of siblings that I've known for years. My favorite days are the ones when I take a shower that I truly deserve. I sleep beautifully those nights.

      Back in the late 70's, I made the switch from jogging to fast-walking, and I remember clearly that it happened on a day when I struggled to run past a pair of women who were walking much faster than I thought they should be at their ages. These days, my husband joins me, which allows us to add hikes and self-guided walking tours to vacations we take. I also kayak quite often, but it's mostly to keep my arms toned.

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  3. In my teens and early twenties it was ice hockey and track & field. In my thirties and forties I was too busy at the office to exercise. Now, in my fifties it's sailing, walking and sometimes working in the yard. It's less intense, but it's still enjoyable. School sports did not stay with me except to send me into young adulthood in good physical shape which has been fairly easy to get back now that I'm getting some exercise again. Also, a long walk to and from school everyday in high school probably helped.


















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  4. I walk regularly, don't drive, and get off the bus/subway one stop early. That's all. Don't smoke. Don't drink. Eat a healthy diet, and feel no need whatsoever to engage in "exercise".

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    1. That sounds like me except that I do drive. I just move around a lot and park the farthest away from my destination, which has to do with impatience in parking areas. I never did like gyms and exercise classes, don't smoke, don't drink, eat whole foods plant based meals, and am very content with that. I'm 66 and have remained slender. I feel good.

      Jacqueline

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  5. As the Australian running guru Percy Cerutty said, as you get older you have to strike a balance between wearing out and rusting out. I'm 57, very devoted to fitness since my mid-teens, and the main difference as I get older is that I'm eliminating exercises that carry a significant injury risk. I still run, lift, and stretch, and I challenge myself, but I increasingly ask myself whether a particular exercise is still really doing anything for me and whether it imposes risks I no longer want to take. For example, last week I cut out one-leg squats because I have other ways of keeping my legs in shape and I am no longer willing to risk losing my balance and blowing out a knee. I also run very low mileage now because it's enough to keep me in excellent shape while also not wearing down my joints unnecessarily.

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    1. Ha! Someone after my own heart!

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  7. I have always been an avid hiker and I still am at 73 (next week). I generally do about a two-mile round trip everyday through the woods. I don't get away to the mountains like the Shenandoah because it now seems like a long ways to drive but perhaps I less reason to leave home. I never thought of it as exercise, though.

    It's safer in the woods, you know. They aren't deep and dark; they're cool and shady.

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  8. The change has been that today I play rather than work out.

    Aiken

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  9. slow and steady pace...on going non stop seasonal projects and assortment of daily physical chores that can't be skipped...plus small hourly "added on" physical things like hydration causes you to move coming/going to where ever, setting my computer chair to lowest downward setting and getting up/down- no hands, using body weight resistance -just using my legs.

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  10. "Working out" is even worse than "exercising".
    Keep active. Walk (at a civilized pace). Eat right. Don't smoke or drink.

    Madison Bailey

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    1. I couldn't agree more, Madison.

      Jacqueline

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  11. A predominantly plant-based diet and an active life eliminates the need for exercise.

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    1. Yes, and it's simple and joyful.

      Jacqueline

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  12. I have given up running and tennis in favour of swimming and cycling. Marathon running seems to cause a lot of heart attacks. Tennis gave me shoulder and elbow problems. Today is the Glorious Twelfth and I'd love to be shooting grouse in Scotland.

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  13. I was a ballerina and figure skater as a child up until my early 20s. I rode dressage into my late 20s (and yes, horseback riding is an incredible workout...not to mention tacking up, grooming, etc...) and now that I'm in my 30's it's gardening, managing my household, and yoga. I'd love to pick up cycling or train for another half marathon again or get another horse but I just don't have the bandwidth or time to do more than a few hours of yoga a week, which I do for my mental health as much as for my physical health. I will again someday, though! This is a busy season!

    - ER

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  14. I was extremely active as a teenager. I skied, wrestled, played hockey and rugby, ran track and cross country. I used to rollerblade and bike everywhere as well. Then I spent a good chunk of my twenties in extremely poor health so the only exercises I was physically capable of doing was walking and light stretching. My health returned in my late twenties and now I lift weights at the gym 4x a week, engage in HIIT workouts, play hockey and softball and bike. I'm also hoping to start skiing more this winter.

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  15. I’d rather enjoy a steak and a martini now and again and engage in a bracing run or endorphin-releasing workout - life’s pleasures, all - to augment the indulgence than go through life a civilized pace-walking teetotaler. Exercise is not a dirty word. But to each her own!

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  16. I don't even call it a workout (or exercise) ~ I just trying to keep my body active around the house by doing various chores, walking our cats outside, yard work, cleaning, etc. Keeping your stomach tight while moving around also helps too. Sedentary lifestyle is unhealthy.

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  17. I'm in my early 20s, so I guess my story is yet to unfold. Growing up, I was a victim of of late puberty. That combined with graduating when I was just a month over 17 meant that I didn't really get to excel at the sports that I wanted. I sailed, swan and played golf during high school but in my mind I'd had always wanted to play rugby since it was always where the big, tall, cool kids in my high school did.

    Towards the middle of my junior year, I hit a major growth spurt and grew about 5 inches. This made it actually possible for me to be good at rugby. I have since continued to play at the collegiate level and at the mens club level now that I've graduated.

    Being a rugby player means that I have to maintained a high level of strength of conditioning which has led me to discover my love of lifting, running, and cycling, along with the occasional dip in the pool.

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  18. Much easier to remain skinny when I was younger with virtually no time set aside for physical activity. As an adult, cycling (road) and cross-country skiing when time and weather cooperate. Fairly routine walking (running makes my knees hurt). 100 push-ups a day most days. It was much easier finding time for all of this before we became parents, of course. 'Parent coma' is a term I stumbled across recently.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

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  19. Although I exercise 7 days a week year 'round - some is for fun (walking, paddleboarding, skiing, hiking, snowshoeing) and some is for health (running & boot camp for weight bearing and resistance training). As I've aged, I've become more aware of the need for healthy bones and to keep my balance skills sharp. Plus, I feel I earn my beer!

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  20. I started running as a teenager and have kept running over the years, although now less devotedly. When I run now, I try to enjoy the freedom and "flow" of it, rather than reaching a speed or distance goal. I walk regularly and generally like to keep active, and being outside is a big motivator. I started weight training and rowing a single scull about two years ago in my late 50s. They are connected in that I started weight training to help me with lifting the boat. The rowing is FUN and it was great to learn a new skill that gets me out of the house and on the water. In the winter I use a rowing machine, and that is mostly for the exercise alone. In the winter my fun activity is cross-country skiing, but that is snow-dependent and so less regular.

    Caroline

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  21. In my fifties now, and my excercise consists of an almost daily robust three mile walk. I've also taken to daily using a mini rebounder for aerobics. It improves my balance, improves circulation, and can be used no matter the outdoor conditions. But, as others have said, "keep moving." Time in the garden and doing other chores keeps me invigorated.

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  22. I am in my mid 40s and I am still running.

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  23. Just about to turn 60 and training for my first half marathon.

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  24. I rowed crew in college. We had to run to the boathouse and I couldn't do it. Made me really want to be able to. So I started running in my 20's and have been running since (though it's more like chugging I call it). I'm 50 now and love to also walk, swim, cycle and do yoga. It just feels good and is good for me.

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  25. Used to run a lot in my 20's and 30's. Then moved to lifiting and playing soccer in my 40's. Now in my 60-70 i am doing TRX and excerise bands.

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