Photo by Salt Water New England

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Reader Question: Winter Coat for the Commuter Rail?

Photo by Salt Water New England
A Reader Question for the Community:
Dear Muffy, 
First of all, thank you for all the beautiful photos and good advice over the years. I have found brands I had never tried before and become a devotee of many recommendations from the community. 
I do have a question regarding winter coats. I am planning my winter wardrobe and commute via light rail. I live in the Rockies and the temperatures vary in winter from 35F down to -6F at the very lowest. It snows but doesn't rain too often, and we don't have too much of a wind chill. Rather than a Patagonia, I was contemplating a Robert W. Stolz Silvia coat. As it is made for the Austrian climate, I assume it will work on most cold days except the truly unbearable. I commute to the university where our dress code is extremely casual. I like to be snug, but I also don't want to take up too much space on a shared seat on the light rail with a bulky coat. I need to be warm at the station and not overheat when I am walking uphill for 10 minutes to my office. 
Many thanks!

Winter Coat Wardrobe Suggestions:

3 comments:

  1. I cannot help you with your selection of women's winter coats. However, you have my condolences that you have to ride RTD every day, especially in the winter.

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  2. MA public transit, winter-28 degrees and not... research the "Iditarod system" set up, even the armpits can unzip to open, perfect length too. This system set up is for standing still to running beside the dog sled for the race. It was a life saver, that and a high grade "Russian comrade" sheepskin hat that folds flat. Turtle Fur: neck gator, cuffs, "snot spot". None of this looks "rob me now $$$" it is plain but excellent- it is the best. Smart wool for socks. Word to wise- be able to MOVE easily and fully when you have to, wear nothing binding/tight.

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  3. A mid size, sturdy/solid rolling backpack is a must, you can slide it under your feet or between your legs. It was a life saver in many ways.

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