Wednesday, April 24, 2019

New Growth Today

Photos by Salt Water New England




















14 comments:

  1. I bet/hope that there are no granite countertops and otherwise "updated" interiors in those magnificent old homes!

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  2. Beautiful...thank you.

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  3. What wonderful photos to start the day. Thank you so much!

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  4. So refreshing to see blue skies and green trees everywhere! Beautiful!

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  5. No granite COUNTERS, please!

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  6. Built a house 13 years ago expecting to sell and move in about 5 years. Installed granite counters in the kitchen for resale value. Surprise! We still here and I love the granite counters. Don't knock it til you try it.

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  7. Here is a helpful quote on granite counter tops....

    "If you’re interested in exotic granite, or worried about your existing countertops, testing for both radon and radiation makes sense. And note that the EPA advises that all homes be tested for radon – regardless of countertop material. If significant levels are found, you’ve got to do something about it to protect your family’s health. For EPA information on radon, go to http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/citguide.html. To see the MIA study on granite, go to http://www.marble-institute.com/industryresources/radontesting_u-akron2008.pdf

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  8. Granite countertops! i just so appreciate the fact that homeowners maintain the exteriors in historical fashion that I never have any negative thoughts about how some who live in these homes might want the conveniences of today. We live in an old Craftsman and given all the detail that went into the construction, I'm inclined to think that the craftsmen of that era would appreciate what we can incorporate into our home to make living more enjoyable.

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  9. Quartz countertops (e.g., Caesarstone and others) make much more sense than granite. With quartz, the surface is perfectly smooth (non-porous) and there is no need for periodic re-sealing. Yes, from a purely aesthetic standpoint, old New England homes were not built with quartz countertops. They also weren't built with modern HVAC systems, indoor plumbing, electricity, etc.

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  10. Lovely homes in early New England spring!

    I’m not sure how we got on the subject of countertops, but my house, built in late 18th/early 19th century in New Hampshire has soapstone, and I love it! Formica would drastically take away from the historic fabric of my house.

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    1. I was just wondering why no one mentioned soapstone until I read your post! As a cook, I love soapstone and always wonder why more people don't desire it.

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  11. The list grows...add granite along with fleece as those things verboten to readers of this blog.
    Even if the homes should contain Formica or granite, they are lovely to look at. Thanks for the pictures.

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  12. Love all of these. Thank you again, Muffy.

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