Friday, March 15, 2019

One Definition of Maturity: When you get as excited about a German boiler as a German motor car.

Photos by Salt Water New England
For some, it is more pleasurable tinkering with the viscera of a house than anything more conspicuous.  Today, the purr of a new (Viessman) German-engineered boiler is providing much of the satisfaction once solely reserved for a German-engineered motor car.






8 comments:

  1. Very impressive!

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  2. As the owner of a German Buderus heating system I can appreciate German engineering. My first Buderus was a multi-fuel system that burned wood, coal and oil, installed over 40 years ago. It was only when coal became almost impossible to find that I installed a new, very high efficiency, Buderus oil-only system ten years ago. It is tied into a complex computer distribution system that handles six zones. It just works!

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  3. few things beat the peace of mind when you replace the heating or AC systems, especially after the annoyance of the old system (usually) quitting at an inopportune time. paying for it, especially that system, isn't really conducive to peace of mind, though.

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  4. I had no knowledge of this system up until now. When I am in Germany, however, I always find some window, plumbing fixture, kitchen gadget, etc, to be completely amazed over.

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  5. Do German boilers have as many maintenance issues as their cars? I live in northern Vermont and would love a state of the art Buderus, but I’m afraid it will be like keeping an aging BMW on the road.

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    1. The boiler itself is just about bulletproof. It needs a cleaning now and again, but any competent serviceman can do that - the job is not particularly different from any other boiler.
      If you are concerned about finding a technician who is familiar with the German-made burner, you can pair the Buderus boiler with a Carlin or other more common burner.

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  6. We have found that a service technician needs experience and training to keep everything running in top form. But, in CT we haven't had a problem finding someone, as these furnaces are not that uncommon. Our Buderus is 16 years old, and looks and operates like new.

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