Tuesday, February 12, 2019

They Shall Not Grow Old


Muffy,  Do me a favor and post a picture of the WWI memorial next to Woodbridge Hall. I've just come from seeing They Shall Not Grow Old. Amazing. Go see it everyone, and tell people to go see it. Perspective, preppies, perspective! Felt as though I could have been looking at my grandfather and great grandfather who both fought in WWI France. Such a job well done. Stay after the credits to hear how the director did it.

April 25 1964 - Photos by Salt Water New England



11 comments:

  1. Own the DVD a Ken Burns style documenty very well done!

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  2. I did not know my grandfathers who fought in WWI. I did know my husband's grandfather. He was quite a man. Thank you.

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  3. Personal question, some time ago you posted a picture of a lovely house in New England, where I am not sure but, the caption stated that the house is where one of the executioners of King Charles I had lived briefly. Can you please post it again or tell me how I can find the picture?

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    1. Not Muffy here. Only remember this because I found I was doubly related to William Leete, with one of his daughters on mother's side, and another of his daughters on father's side. Posted last July second. Scroll back. Had it in my mind to visit, but never got round to it.

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  4. Was lucky enough to catch this limited release. It was fascinating on two levels. First Peter Jackson colorized, restored and changed the speed on the original footage (most which was overexposed, underexposed and jerky in its movement like many silent films). Then he researched what division the men were in, found lip readers to figure out what they were saying and then hired actors with the right accents to speak the words. Amazing! It made the footage come to life. The second thing was how all this was done. The technical stuff was fascinating too. Run and see this documentary the first chance you get. You'll be glad you did!

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    1. ABSOLUTELY AGREE! Fantastic production and I'm so thankful we went to see it. Very appreciative of the sacrifices and the way that this was presented to us. I am happy to see this film created in today's age. One of my favorite moments in film was when everything suddenly shifted; a tangible intake of breath from everyone in the theater. - hrplo

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  5. This wasn't shown in my part of the country, but I'm definitely going to buy the DVD when it comes out (the current version doesn't work on US players). People I know who've seen it just rave about this historical masterpiece.

    I've studied World War One for some time now, and recommend "The Guns of August" by Barbara Tuchman to those who want to find out how so-called civilized countries could have fallen into this senseless, home-by-Christmas, abyss. Ironically, many years prior to this Nietzsche predicted that with mass industrialization would come "wars that have never been seen on earth before."
    Of course, nobody listened to him.

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  6. For various reasons, I don't go to the movies anymore, but an exception was made for this. So very well done, and yes to staying past the end credits to see how they did it.

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  7. For whatever the reason, I have been reading poetry written around the time of WW I. I will make no mention of the authors or the poems because people these days seem to form opinions or be judgmental of works based on reviews or the particular line of thought writers are identified with. I'd just suggest reading some period writing regarding the Great War.

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  8. I made a point of seeing this film when it came out. It brought tears to my eyes. For years I was somewhat disinterested in WW1 though very interested in WW2. I still do not understand why. When some years ago I decided to start reading about the experiences of people who served in WW1 I found it was every bit as tough as we had understood it to be. Apart from the horror, what stuck with me were the primitive conditions in which they lived on those occasions when they were in the trenches (in the British army in many infantry regiments this worked out to be about 40% of their time on the western front.) Too often the conditions in the trenches included freezing cold, rain, frostbite, trench foot, no shelter apart from "funk holes" - shallow niches carved in the trench walls to get them out of the weather, deplorable sanitation and all too often poor food or even no food when supplies could not get through from the rear. All of this while being shot at by snipers, machine gunners and artillery.
    I wonder how people today would cope. Hell, I don't think we could. In any event kudos to Peter Jackson and his team.

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