Sunday, January 27, 2019

Yale's Two New Residential Colleges

Photos by Salt Water New England
"Two new residential colleges, Benjamin Franklin and Pauli Murray, the work of Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York, will house some 904 new resident students...carrying forward the Gothic template of the University... in a seamless 21st-century set of buildings." - TraditionalBulding.com

"[F]ew architects get the chance to spend what some say is two-thirds of a billion dollars (though Stern's office says it was much less) on making dormitories that, because of Yale’s stature, will stand as models for such facilities around the country and even the world." - Aaron Betsky, Architect Magazine
 “People generally think of Yale as being an entirely grey stone campus, but in truth, it’s largely brick,” - Melissa DelVecchio, AIA, a Partner at Robert A.M. Stern Architects
"So often, there is a perception that we just can’t build like this anymore." - Architect  Robert A.M. Stern, interviewed by Katie Gerfen.

The project has earned LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold.


"Three new towers serve as vertical campus markers, giving the new colleges a presence on Yale’s skyline and linking them to the campus core." - Society for College and University Planning's Excellence in Architecture for a New Building Honor







































17 comments:

  1. Amazing what cubic dollars can accomplish

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  2. Good to see they can still “build like this...” thank you!
    Waiting to see now when they build something like the Pantheon.

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  3. Perhaps architecture's modernist nightmare has finally ended. All that is needed is some representational art on the interior walls, but I suppose that is too much to hope for. The Armory Show hangover lingers, unfortunately.

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  4. Overall they're lovely, but I'm not a fan of the seemingly haphazard placement of some of the lighter stone bricks

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  5. If only students would dress accordingly.

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  6. Wonderful photos. Thank you.

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  7. Only a "fair" effort; overdone and overly rusticated not in a good way. Some portions are correctly retrained but all in all, someone got too crazy with the brickwork, unfortunately.

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    1. I agree with you Fred. Perhaps they look better in person (??) but my initial reaction to the pictures was that they look like sloppy gingerbread houses. They also remind me of the tacky faux fade whiskers found on the pelvis of so called ' vintage jeans'. Elizabeth

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  8. They strike me as too new. They are too bright and don't have that well worn look. I love the gothic, but when you walk past them they jump out at you because they are so new looking.

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  9. Both dorms (called colleges at Yale btw) are lovely but they are located far off the main campus so there's that.

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  10. How wonderful to see new college buildings that are not tacky, modern chrome & glass, cold and impersonal. The color of the brick will soften over time the placement of different tones will seem to blend harmoniously. I think Yale made the right decision here...very brave.

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  11. And thank you for sharing these lovely photos, taken on a bright sunny day!

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  12. Congratulations to the contractors, the brick workers, blacksmiths, the glaziers, the artisans and craftsmen and trades workers, the actual men and women who built the buildings brick by brick, pane by pane. These are a testament to their dedication, skill, care, and craft.

    The Concord Diaspora

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  13. I think the brick work, and color, are a nod to Connecticut Hall, the oldest building which is located on Old Campus. It does jump out a bit at the moment, but in forward thinking give it a few years. It will mellow, and the trees will grow. A good portion of the neo-gothic and neo-Tudor campus was built in the 1930s and they acid washed the stone then to age it. Sterling Memorial Library and Paine Whitney Gym went through extensive cleanings in the recent years and the results of the acid wash was removed. They look like they have been standing for, well, almost a century now. As far as location, the two new residential colleges are across the street, or no more than four blocks from the majority of classrooms. I had to walk or bike a mile to the center of my university. You want chrome and glass? Evans Hall, the School of Management, has plenty. Something that I love is that Paul Mellon, who donated many buildings and a vast, extremely important art collection to the university never put his name on anything. Rather he had the residential colleges named after Stiles or Morse, YCBA, YUAG etc. This sort of old school, understated, incredibly generous sort of philanthropy seems to have died with Brooke Astor and David Rockefeller most recently. All the new money could take a lesson from their book.

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  14. The Prince of Wales would approve. A beautiful place to study or visit.

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  15. I like the so-called haphazard limestone placements. It's surprising to the eye, drawing the eye in a compelling way. Stepping back, it almost feels like the buildings are breaking through and shedding an old, limestone skin and showing a new brick skin. Kinda like how I felt when graduating.

    Aiken

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