Monday, January 7, 2019

By the Door

Photo by Salt Water New England
Left to Right:  Hunter Outdoor; Cordings of Piccadilly; Dubarry of Ireland, Barbour (and a few more Barbours squeezed in...)

14 comments:

  1. Enviable. How much space do you allow between hooks?

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    1. Around seven or eight inches, but that is not based on anything justifiable.

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  2. The jackets are all beautiful - but all look similar in color, warmth, and style. What's the difference between these jackets that you own three?

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    1. The tweed coats are naturally warmer than the waxed cotton Barbour's. In my experience, Cordings' field coats are very different to the Dubarry - heavier wool and thicker quilting. For hunting and shooting, other European brands are superior. My tweed field coats from Schoffel , for example, offers more movement and it is machine washable.

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  3. Muffy, How does the Hunter field coat compare to the Cordings? The price difference is substantial, but I have never been able to try them on for comparison.

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    1. Both of them are made in England. The Cordings is a superior coat, but the Hunter offers significant quality for the money and many game keepers speak highly of it.

      The Hunter is wool blend (Cordings is all wool), and also has raglan sleeves, knit cuffs and spacious pockets. But it is a work coat. While the Hunters is quite well made, it is not nearly as finely finished as the Cordings.

      The Cordings (made by Chrysalis) is simply lovely - beautifully woven tweed, finely finished, generously sized, with a loden cloth collar and a zippy gold satin lining.

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    2. Thank you kindly for offering this reply. Just the information I was seeking.

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    3. For a cheap wool blend coat, take a look at the Derby tweed coats of Rydale Clothing of Yorkshire (rydale.com). In the current sale, they are only £70 and the waxed jackets start at £15. They're recommended by The Shooter magazine and are made in Great Britain too!

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  4. Just as many my age, who have spent a lifetime accumulating, are in the middle of our campaigns of downsizing, winnowing, eliminating, simplifying, you tempt us with this. Such a naughty girl.

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  5. I can't speak of the other tweed jackets here, but I do own one of the Cordings House Check Tweed Field Coats as shown, and am completely satisfied with it. For my taste none could be "superior" to it in any way. Plus, the pound to dollar exchange rate has been favorable of late (around 1.27 today) so now might be a good time to pick up a fine Cordings jacket that will never go out of style, and that will provide many years of enjoyable usage.

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  6. Let's talk scarves : which universities are they ?

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  7. Replies
    1. Second from right is Mansfield College, Oxford.

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