Thursday, November 29, 2018

Around Town

Photos by Salt Water New England





15 comments:

  1. This picture is the perfect visual for why I love living in New England. Classic, small town charm at its finest.

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  2. Such simple elegance.

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  3. Does anybody order fresh wreaths online (Vermont Country Store? LL Bean?) If so, what are your favorite sources?

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    1. If you are open to buying local to you vs online, many churches sell fresh wreaths as part of their fundraising at their holiday fairs, or at least they do here in Maine.

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    2. Yes, we ordered from LL Bean for several years for my in-laws when they moved to FL. Always fresh and lovely.

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  4. I believe it was on This Old House where a homeowner in a little village wanted to paint his home some color other than white but those in control would not approve any color that broke with tradition. The homeowner then uncovered the original paint color and was a color other than white and....
    White is my favorite but I really do appreciate the other colors that you show in your posts.

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    1. Hah. What that homeowner failed to realize is that "tradition" really meant the last 30 years, not the last 300!

      Similarly, many today are surprised to learn that in the 17th through early 19th centuries, Windsor chairs were usually painted. When it was made, the maker would lay on one coat (such as green or red) then overpainted with black, perhaps. As the black wore through use, the lower color began to show through.

      (It was usually milk paint, too.)

      The makers back then did this because the various parts of the chair were made from different woods and finishing it with a clear varnish (as is the custom today) would reveal the dissimilar wood grains. Seats, for example, were usually pine and frequently showed knots. This was no problem when they would be hidden under a couple coats of paint, as was in common use.

      Mike Dunbar's books on building Windsor chairs are a fascinating look at woodcraft using the old techniques — the real traditional ones.

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  5. Beautifully decorated doors... With Christmas decorations starting earlier each year, what is the general consencus "start date" for outdoor wreaths, etc. (and 'etcetera' does not refer to the inflatable-plastic-garden-whatever-they-are-decorations)... 1st of Advent, a couple of weeks before Christmas...?

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  6. Muffie, when I look at your beautiful photos, my reaction is:

    God Bless America.

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  7. Love these picturesque wooden houses!

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  8. I must admit to envying all those sunny days that New Englanders enjoy in autumn and winter. I can't recall the last time that rainy days were featured on here. The weather in "Old" England has been poor, mostly wet and gloomy, in recent weeks.

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  9. It used to be the Twelve Days of Christmas, 12 days before and 12 days after, taking them all down by 6th January (which is the traditional date for taking decorations down).

    Maybe a day or two before the thirteenth if that is a weekend and more convenient. Actually, if the fourteenth is a Saturday I would leave it and do it then. But to be correct, it should be Dec 13th.

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  10. I just fact checked what I wrote. I actually was just quoting that which I previously posted. Apparently it used to be Christmas Eve that the tree and decorations went up and it lasted until 12 days after that, when everything was taken down. During the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, Christmas celebrations in America took place sporadically between Dec. 6, the feast of St. Nicholas, and Jan. 6, the feast of the Epiphany.

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  11. And still more reading... Decorations traditionally started on Advent Sunday about 4 weeks prior to Christmas.

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  12. Dec 2nd for 2018 was Advent Sunday, the 4th Sunday before Christmas....

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