Monday, November 26, 2018

All Creatures Great and Small

Photo by Salt Water New England

14 comments:

  1. This makes my heart so happy.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This makes my day.

    MaryAnne

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh, Muffie, that remarkable photo has a holiness about it.

    I live in Pennsylvania. Today is practically a state holiday.
    It is opening day for antler deer hunting season.

    I realize that many individuals use the meat and that hunting helps "control" the deer population. I try to feel non-judgmental about the kills. However, for the life of me, I don't understand how standing in a tree stand with a scoped rifle shooting at an unarmed deer in its home environment is a sport. It baffles me that some people take great pride and satisfaction in killing these beautiful animals. I am not wired that way, but I try to respect those that are.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deer in numbers of one or two are a delightful bucolic sight (so long as you're careful to check your clothing for ticks after getting close to them).

      But deer don't remain in ones and twos for long because they have no natural predators any more to keep their numbers in check. Instead, they have only cars and trucks as "predators," and so their numbers go on increasing without significant limit.

      My only objection to hunters is that they go after the bucks for the antlers. The ones they ought to be shooting are the does, who produce litters of several fawns every year.

      Want a more natural control? Support the reintroduction of wolves into suburbia. (Coyotes? You already have them — check around the dumpsters at McDonalds — but they aren't usually strong enough to bring down deer.)

      So unless we go with wolves, we should plan on crashing into, or shooting, deer ad infinitum.

      Delete
    2. I absolutely love photographs like this. Thank you Muffie.
      Anonymous: Oh yes,the dreaded hunting season. I feel the same as you do about hunting and I'm no sissy..I'm a biologist and conservationist and I hunted as a young girl with my father. Today, I live by Albert Schweitzer's philosophy to kill nothing for sport and certainly not take pride in it. It just seems psychopathic in this day to enjoy stalking and killing any living creature. I'm currently trying to rescue a parakeet/budgie that hurricane Michael blew into my garden. He is a beautiful yellow-green and hangs out with a flock of red wing blackbirds. I'm grappling with whether I should just let him continue to enjoy his freedom or if I should cage him. He's been with me almost a month and I'm concerned he won't survive the cold. I won't stand by and allow him to suffer so,I placed a bird cage next to the wild bird feeders and I'm feeding him good quality parakeet seed with organic fruits and veggies. He's shown no interest in the food inside the cage and will only eat from the wild bird feeder. I probably need another parakeet to use as a lure but it's just too cold to put a pet bird outside. I'm hoping he will eventually seek refuge in the cage ( I have a string attached to the cage door that I can pull from my mudroom to close it)but if he doesn't, there isn't any more that I can do. Every evening as the temp plummets, I worry about "Michael", the parakeet and every morning I run to the window in hopes of seeing him at the feeder. If any other readers have any suggestions on how I might rescue him, please share as I know nothing about caged birds. I would be most grateful. Elizabeth

      Delete
    3. To 10:36 pm If you live in PA you should understand the over population of deer in this state! The sickness that occurs with large numbers, road kill numbers along with vehicle accidents, the damage to property both rural and suburban. We live nestled in a lovely treed green space, some of it we own and enjoy all manor of wild birds and wildlife that includes a fair size population of deer. Would be nice to have a remedy for all the damage they cause to our property as well as our neighbors. Hunting of course is not allowed within the township otherwise we as well as neighbors might have venison on the Thanksgiving table. PA

      Delete
  4. Such a wonderful photo.

    ReplyDelete
  5. No deer in the yard today (thank goodness!) but we were visited by 3 turkeys -- a white one, a red one and a black one. Think they are wild birds but they love bird seed!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anon. 11:28: Hunters and fishermen are experientially honest in acquiring their meat and do not shrink from the details. Yes, more genteel to get it pre-cut, irradiated, barcoded and shrinkwrapped at Whole Foods, all that ickypoo unpleasantness delegated to invisible immigrant labor paid under the table. Wonder if that high horse tastes good. . . !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous 4:51 Some hunters and fishermen are educated and ethical but I've seen way too many photos of men posing for pictures with dead animals and gloating on their kill as if that makes them superior in some way.
      Interestingly enough, the deer in my area are so abundant and unhealthy that they are inedible. The Whitetail is now plagued with new viruses, bacteria and parasites and as someone who has been battling Lyme for over 3 years, I'm terrified of introducing another pathogen to my already compromised immune system. A few years ago we had a controlled hunt and they had hoped to donate the venison to charitable organizations but it wasn't fit for human consumption. I rarely consume any meat but not for any moral reason- I just don't think that it's necessary. Elizabeth

      Delete
  7. In addition to Muffie's content, another thing I appreciate about this blog is the reasoned (usually), thought-provoking comments left by readers.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Pretty hard to eat meat and be against the legal harvesting of wildlife. Also, the money hunters generate for habitat conservation far exceeds the funds provided from any other source.

    Hunters and anglers have a connection to Earth and their food that most Americans now do not.

    Poachers are something different entirely. GLH

    ReplyDelete
  9. I live in suburban Fairfax County, Virginia, about twenty miles from the back door of the White House, and hunting is permitted here. In fact, there will be signs posted to that effect just a few hundred yards from our house. Bow hunting only, of course. We see them frequently. There are beaver in the same area, which are disliked much more than the deer.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I've had the misfortune of hitting one deer and one hitting me. The one that hit me drove in the door of my old 240 Volvo but after a few days of fluctuating outdoor temperatures the dent just popped out with no signs of damage. Woodpeckers damaging siding, chipmunks making holes in the yard perfectly sized and hidden for stepping into and of course the reports of an abundance of rabid raccoons keep me conflicted because I do love wildlife. I guess Rodney King expressed my sentiments: "Can't we all just get along?"

    ReplyDelete