Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Question: What is your warmest winter coat?

Grandmother, Connecticut Shoreline, Late 1950s - Photo by Salt Water New England

Question for the community:  When the weather is the coldest, what coat will you be wearing this winter?

45 comments:

  1. A friend used to own a Maine Warden Coat from LL Bean. It was much, much too warm for winters in NYC, so he had to return it. I think it's only suitable for the far northern continental US (Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, Wyoming, etc.), Alaska, and Canada. It's really designed for extreme cold, not places with more ordinary winter weather where temperatures average between 20 and 40 degrees such as Chicago, NYC, etc.

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    1. I have an Eddie Bauer coat that is similar in weight and warmth to the Maine Warden Coat you mention.

      Much too warm except for the coldest winter days (or nights!) in the Upper Midwest.

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  2. MA winters of -28 temps, using/late transfers for public transit.
    https://akgear.com/product-category/clothing/parkas/
    -----
    Iditarod parka system, even the armpits un zip.

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  3. I have a Baxter State Parka from Bean that serves well for below freezing temperatures, and is roomy enough to add layers if the weather warrants. One definitely does not want to keep it on indoors, though, as one would easily overheat. It has lots of pocket, which is really handy.

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    1. I have a 30 year old Baxter State Parka that is the warmest coat I have ever worn. When it is well below zero I put several layers of under armor, a heavy sweater and a down vest under it. It has kept me warm standing for hours !

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  4. Currently, my LL Bean down parka. Oddly enough, I recall staying just as warm in a knee-length Crombie overcoat worn over a wool suit with a cashmere scarf. NO wind penetrated that heavy woven Crombie wool.

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  5. Barbour wool lined heavy Beauchamp . Discontinued 8-10 years back , since too expensive .

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  6. My experience, having lived in Vermont and now Maine through many winters is that even the warmest "rated" coats won't really keep you warm unless you keep moving. Down doesn't do much for me and I hate the way it sheds feathers on everything. Layers of wool with a 100% wool overcoat is what I recommend. The brand doesn't matter as long as it's 100% wool as opposed to wool inspired (I made that term up, but the low percentages of wool in wool coats that most manufacturers are using these days is rather ridiculous). Wool will keep you warm even when wet.

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  7. My father's old goose down Michelin Man skiing parka-navy blue on the outside and bright yellow on the inside. Nothing can replace it!

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  8. What I wear during the winter depends on the conditions. It has usually been a Filson cruiser with a vest or sweater beneath and a windbreaker sort of parka over top. When I was working, it was dress clothes as a base layer but for tramping around in the woods, a wool shirt, long drawers and usually Filson "tin" pants. We don't have much really cold weather down here in Virginia, though, and only rarely will have deep snows. One never needs as much when you're active compared with what you might want when you're standing around on the platform at the train station.

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    1. Not in Virginia, but in the Great Lakes area... Keeping on the move makes a big, big difference. I've shoveled snow when the temperature was in the teens, and any coat was too much.

      Instead, I wear a watch cap (110% of your body heat goes out through your head, you know...), gloves (mittens if it's the snowblower), no coat, regular indoor shirt and jeans, and trail boots.

      Even with that, I'll feel warm — even sweaty — so long as I keep shoveling. Want to cool off? Just pause to survey the magnificence of a snowstorm.

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  9. My Canada Goose Trillium Parka is hands down the warmest coat I own. I pair it with insulated bean boots for really cold days and wool sweaters underneath. Not super classic, more on the techwear side of the fashion house...but living in Michigan means we have really, really long winters and I'd rather be warm than stylish.

    - ER

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  10. My Woorlrich Wool Hunt Coat (today's name for it, I forget what they called it years ago when I bought it). It's HEAVY, but nothing gets through it and I love that the collar can be turned up to my ears and secured w/ a throat latch. It got me through many bitter northern Vermont winters. I don't wear it as much now that I'm in Massachusetts but, when I do need it, it's ready and waiting!

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  11. My Bean Maine Warden Coat never fails!

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  12. I have a Down Filled coat with a fur trimmed hood that was made in Calgary by Alberta Manufacturing Co.. I believe it's rated for 50 below and I only wear it when it's really really cold . I'd never had a cold moment in it here in Vermont .

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    1. Sunice jackets made around 1988 were just about as good...

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  13. My Brooks Bros. toggle coat. It has a large collar and also a hood with a wool plaid lining.

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  14. A "British Warm" from O'Connell's:http://www.oconnellsclothing.com/O-Connell-s-British-Warm-Overcoat.html
    Lives up to its name. Peacoat-weight wool, but tailored, longer in length, and classic. Works well with suits, odd jackets, cords, and even jeans. I suspect this distinguished gentleman here would agree: http://www.zimbio.com/photos/Prince+Philip/Royal+Family+Attend+Church+Christmas+Day/n6GJe1t7_63

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  15. I have this old Burberry from maybe 20 years ago when they made a large variety of top quality outerwear. It's a mid-thigh-length dark brown nubuck lined with shearling. A small bit of shearling as well around the collar and cuffs. Very simple design. It cost me a fortune when I bought it but it is still going strong.

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  16. While I own a North Face Nuptse (very warm, puffy jacket), I prefer layering with a base layer, shirt, sweater, and Lands End Squall jacket. It works well for our Idaho winters.

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  17. Thinsulate lined barn coat from LLBean does the job. Bought this years ago, so can’t vouch for today’ s version.

    MaryAnne

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  18. British Warm for jacket and tie days, LL bean down jacket and down filled hood for all other stuff.

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  19. I have an arsenal of coats to and layering items suit almost every combination of conditions imaginable. My warmest is probably my Mountain Hardwear 800-fil down Summit Parka. Because it was designed to be featherlight, the face fabric is a gossamer nylon and not very durable, so it isn't an everyday, go-to coat. In fact, I should probably give it away or sell it because I don't do that much technical mountaineering these days. Most chilly days, I wear a Lands' End Squall jacket. If conditions are going to be really rough, I wear a Squall Parka if I'm going to be outdoors a lot (like at a Broncos game), or need something to cover a blazer or suit jacket.

    I have a couple of ski jackets, a belay jacket, aerobic jackets (XC skiing, snowshoeing, winter running or cycling), and fleece jackets from a variety of outdoor brands. Not to mention vests! I wear the Woolrich barn coat I'm wearing in my photo as an outer layer when I'm working on the property, more to protect insulating layers than for warmth. As I said, I have an arsenal. So does my wife. And we have to consider guests who arrive unprepared.

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  20. For really cold days, I like the Patagonia Nano-Puff jacket. Very warm synthetic that doesn't degrade when wet and very light weight. It fits nicely under a Barbour, which acts as a shell to block the wind.

    If not freezing cold, I'll just throw on an old LL Bean Norwegian sweater under the Barbour along with a Barbour vest. That works as well as everything but the Patagonia.

    If I have to dress up, a 1980s-vintage Burberry topcoat, but the Patagonia is warmer.

    Aiken

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  21. I plan not to be as uplifted by anything for the rest of this week as I am by this photo, in particular the waist-deep snow.

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  22. Here in Charlotte NC, almost any sort of windproof coat over a sweater will do for most of the winter: very few days under freezing. My "trick" is light silk long underwear. It's amazingly warm under wool, and doesn't overheat you indoors.

    More specifically, camelhair polo overcoat, or REI down jacket

    NCJack

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  23. I actually laughed out loud when I saw these questions. OH, TO HAVE COLD WEATHER!! How I love wrapping up in coats and scarves and hats and gloves! Alas, we don't have what you guys would call "cold weather" here in Atlanta. I'm with Jack from Charlotte. A windbreaker or fleece jacket is fine most of the winter (which lasts all of 6 weeks, maybe).

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  24. After not having a proper winter coat for several years, I purchased the rather massive Helly Hansen Spitsbergen Parka at the end of last winter. I am eager to find out if it is worth the amount of space taken up in my small NYC closet!

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  25. I live in Southern Australia and while we do not have the extreme winter climate of North America, winters can be exceedingly rainy, cold enough and windy. Which can still make for an unpleasant experience, especially when the wind comes from the South Pole.
    To top it off I have a horror of feeling cold and consequently, a fetish for winter jackets. Probably my warmest jacket for every day use is an original US Navy Pea Coat which is much thicker than the commercial ones made for the fashion industry. I brought it from a local shop which imports classic vintage men's gear from USA. I also use as an alternative, a USA Carhartt blanket lined Canvas Barn Coat bought from the same store. It is no slouch either. When weather really gets cold though, I enjoy another piece of vintage gear. This is an army surplus long-tailed field jacket from somewhere in Europe. It has a detachable thick-pile liner which is about the next best thing to skinning a bear and wearing that. And about as heavy. Finally as a further alternative, if dressed formally I will wear over my suit, a lined Burberry trench and a nice scarf. If really necessary an over-sized gilet can be worn over the suit as well.

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  26. I live in Minnesota and best coat I have owned is an Original Montgomery, London Duffle coat, made in England by the the original British duffle coat manufacturer (apologies to the editor, I know you featured a Cordings duffle garment recently).

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  27. NYC may not be as cold as Maine, but standing around and waiting for an Uber or taxicab in the wind tunnels that are so often prevalent during the winter months makes it seem like one is out in the Canadian tundra somewhere. I used to wear a quilted Barbour coat with a vest underneath, or a topcoat back in the day, but this past year decided city fashion was far less important than freezing my tail off. I bought a Bean Baxter State parka and it's fantastic. Bundled all the way up with the faux fur hood up, it forms a solid barricade against the cold. And it's considerably more affordable than the Canadian Gooses of the world. It does remind me a bit more of the coats I once wore as a grammar school student than something I should be wearing while working in finance on Park Ave, but not a care is given!

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  28. A lined Gill sailing jacket with high collar and cinched waist. Good for shedding sticky snow that accumulates late at night when I have to go out and clear the walk and driveway.

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  29. Western Mountaineering Meltdown Jacket. That is the most we ever need around here. You can get the parka or the lighter jackets if you need it where you are. Made in USA. WM is one of the coolest, most authentic companies I know. Sierra-worthy down products made in San Jose. Still doing the same thing with the same products for the 15-20 years I have been buying their products. The sleeping bags and quilts are also great.

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  30. A couple of years ago I purchased a Patagonia Tres 3-in-1 Parka. I LOVE that I can remove layers to accommodate the weather. I live in the PNW so we have more rainy days than super cold and I appreciate being warm and dry. My only gripe with it is its feather "sharing." Is this a Patagonia thing? - hrplo

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  31. A 1980s LLBean down jacket I snagged at about $50 as I remember. With a heavy LLBean wool pull over sweater, I'm ready to go plus LLBean's silk underwear. But then again in my part of the world (GA), if it's like 15F, we are all freezing! Winter comes in about Dec and blows out like late Feb, maybe March. But oh the summers!

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  32. A Lands End Commuter Down Coat (long)-- sometimes it is almost too warm (learned that in London last year), as well as the slightly lighter Chalet.

    And it seems like everyone is wearing their coats these days in black, and I find it boring. The Commuter is navy, the Chalet bright red (the red is better for visibility when on foot.)

    --EM

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  33. I have a Women's Eddie Bauer long puffer coat with hood. I like it because I'm tall, and they come in tall sizes. The sleeves don't ride up at the wrists because it's a tall size, and it's long enough to cover my knees. It's down and fairly light-weight, more bulky than heavy, and I wear this on very cold days here in Vermont, and I'm always warm. It's not the kind of coat you'd wear outside to do any kind of work, for that I'd wear several layers and a canvas-type barn coat, right now mine is from Orvis, but everyone has them. But my long coat is by far the warmest.

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  34. I absolutely love the grandmother's ultra long parka in the photo, would love to get one like that! I have a weakness for beautiful, warm coats, my special favourites are from Max Mara, (I'm rather addicted), have got some beautiful padded parkas from them too. I have several Woolrich down parkas and a lovely bright red Penfield down parka and my forest green New Zealand Swanndri bush coat keeps one extremely cosy. My grandmother handed down to me her old beautiful Burberry macintosh which is reversible, with a wonderful Harris Tweed in colours of Scottish glens in August (reminds me when I wear it of when our family always headed up to the Scottish Highlands each year). I love my powder pink Harris Tweed ankle length coat with velvet collar, my Johnston's of Scotland cashmere maxi coat, my navy ultra long Lands End Chalet coat ... only trouble is, I have recently emigrated to the sub-tropical Bay of Islands in New Zealand from London, so I'm going to have to book some hols in colder climes to make use of them in future.

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  35. I own a double-breasted polo coat from Ralph Lauren rendered in a color flecked gray herringbone tweed. Full length, cut to finish at the mid-calf. Replete with a half-belted back, knife-sharp peak lapels (which can be folded over and closed on each other in case of extreme wind or snow), large mailbox style patch and flap pockets and a flapped breast pocket as well. Thickest tweed I've ever encountered. Wonderful coat.

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  36. The warmest coat I own is a JNY down parka my mom bought for me a couple of years ago. I live in Canada and it keeps me warm on the coldest winter days.

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  37. When I left to teach in a small bush village in Arctic Alaska my father sent along his 1970's LLBean down coat. What a warm coat it is even to -72 F. I again have the coat and value it for its warmth as well as heritage. Nowadays, I wear a lined, hooded long woolen coat from LLBean that I purchased for 5.00 a couple years ago. The old beaner coats are worth keeping.

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  38. A barbour bedale with an Irish Aryan jumper, scarf, gloves, wool knit cap, mug of coffee, duck boots, and moving quickly, so the winds of Nahampsha does not freeze me. It is total system and attitude against the winter

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  39. I am partial to Columbia's innovative technology to stay warm...reflective silvery material on the inside of their coats and hats to reflect the body's own heat back into the wearer, light weight washable, 1000 turbo down, and innovative wind blocking materials. Layering a light dense goose down under a heat reflecting wind breaker is a terrific toasty combination. They began as a great independent family-owned company headed up by the indomitable Gertie Boyle and most of her family are still in leadership roles even though Columbia is now a publicly-traded company.

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  40. My go to for the worst days is a wartime Royal Canadian Navy bridge coat. Like a pea coat but to the knees. Twice as thick as a USN pea coat. Unfortunately twice as heavy, but like having my house on my back.

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  41. A Gloverall toggle coat that I've had for years. Very toasty in the coldest temps, but brother, it is heavy!

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