Thursday, September 20, 2018

What Are Your Favorite Non-U.S. New Sources?


With Technology, Some BBC News is Available On Demand Using Voice Commands...

More than ever, to be sufficiently informed, one must use a variety of news sources.  This is true for everything from headlines to long form.

And if you believe that at least one or two sources should be non-U.S., which are your favorites?  And how do you access them?  Weekly magazines?  Newspapers?  Podcasts?  Home delivered?  Browser?  Well-stocked newsstand? Trips abroad?

 ...And so is the Always Helpful (For Drifting Off) Shipping Forecast.

46 comments:

  1. My husband enjoys BBC news which he watches on our DirecTV service. He feels they are pretty objective.

    MaryAnne

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    1. The BBC News in the UK is very biased. Its pro-Corbyn propaganda makes Russia Today look like a model of independent thinking. That's a reflection of the domination of ex-Guardian and other hard-left journalists on the editorial staff. Their endless obsession with Donald Trump, bordering on irrational hatred, is beyond parody.

      It is only matched by its anti-Brexit Project Fear. It carries every bizarre scare story put out by the vested interests who are funded by the EU and its allies. e.g. Richard Branson and George Soros. Anyone who dares to challenge them is smeared as far right, xenophobic, racist or populist.

      This Orwellian Newspeak channel is funded by our television tax (aka the "licence"), of $200, enforced by the threat of huge fines and imprisonment. Even the old Soviet Union abolished its television licence in 1961.

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    2. Ken ... you're absolutely right about what has happened to the once venerable BBC which, as you point out, is now a total joke.

      Actually, I suppose one shouldn't be too surprised by the BBC's fall from grace when you consider who the Mayor of London is, and how much of British society has degenerated in recent decades. As a young man, I once lived briefly in London, but today you couldn't pay me to even visit it. A wrong-headed socially-engineered disgrace.

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  2. I get my shipping forecast from Mrs. Bale. ;-)

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    1. First thing I thought of. My favorite.

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    2. Thinking of buying what will probably be our last dog. Husband wants Airedale. I'm agreeable if we can name it Finisterre. Thank you Mrs. Bale.

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  3. We are regular readers of BBC and Reuters on the iPhone. The BBC is somewhat neutral. It offers coverage of overseas news ignored by North American outlets. We also like France 24 which performs about the same as the BBC but is broadcast by the French, from
    Paris, in English. France Info we look at when we are
    In the mood to read French.
    One, alas, has to look with skepticism on our American press. Every paper or tv network now seems to have a front page agenda. Opinions and comments previously were confined to the editorial
    page. Those days now seem like a very long time ago.

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  4. Given the sharp turn toward Anglophilia on this blog, we think it should be renamed "Saltwater England." We wouldn't mind at all. We spend about half the year in England and have family in Kent. When in the U.S. we listen only to BBC radio's streaming service for news, features, drama, music and chat. We think everything is better in England. Cheers!

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  5. Here in Canada we often find ourselves inundated with US news. British newspapers and the various wire services, and some of our mainstream newspapers (both on the right and left of the political spectrum) can be helpful when seeking balanced reporting. There are also some excellent US outlets, including the New York Times, as well as the Washington Post. Those of us seeking balanced reporting tend to avoid the likes of Fox, which bills itself as a news outlet, but is legally listed as an entertainment network. RT makes for comic relief, when one is in the mood for over-the-top totalitarian bonkers drivel -- but only then.

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    1. SO well said. I can utterly relate.

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  6. BBC on siriusxm and the financial Times delivered every mornimg.

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  7. I have a running subscription to The Economist. If I want to challenge myself, I'll look at what Al-Jazeera has to say on a topic. If I want to really challenge myself, I'll hop on the People's Daily website (the official paper of China's Communist Party). The People's Daily is also to see what people in China recieve as news from the state, which I think can be very illuminating.

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  8. I still get my foreign news from the online “Deutsche Welle” although it has been poisoned with a leftist slant. And many Europeans get their only US “news” from the likes of CNN, The New York Times and The Washington Post – agitprop -- so they have no idea about the truth, and all the wonderful things that are finally going on over here. I also find “Der Spiegel” has likewise been bamboozled by biased American political reporting so I now have to read it with caution and skepticism.

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  9. The Telegraph online.

    Jrandyv
    Vancouver WA

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  10. Absolutely. It started with Deutsche Welle on TV, then NK. Now we electronically stream everything. Love DW - there is something uber Euro about it all. Hosts always look impeccable, sets are modern elegant, and reporting still is professional. Being former expats, BBC radio was the English gift to the world for news & entertainment, now better with streaming. We surf half a dozen news sources a day. Fascinating and often unsettling to hear versions of U.S. news from the outside. For fun, we are also great Tatler (UK & Hong Kong) & Hello (French & Spanish) digital magazine fans.

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  11. As a way of improving my French, I've been listening to a lot of French news radio (RFI and France Inter).

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  12. FT, Economist, Der Spiegel, South China Morning Post,Le Monde Diplomatique,Irish Times

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  13. BBC World Service although their rolling news format is tiresome. It was better 20+ years ago on shortwave, but time, technology, and money march on. We also listen occasionally to German and Norwegian news online since we are culturally oriented toward those areas of the world.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

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    1. P.S.
      BBC Radio 4 online, which we also enjoy, is also good for world nd British news with varied interesting cultural and entertainment programming. . . Plus the shipping news.

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  14. As a child the news was Walter Cronkite and the Atlanta Journal. When I lived in DC, I would spend Sundays reading the Washington Post. I no longer subscribe to newspapers. I watch Fox and CNN and assume the truth is somewhere in between. For solid information that I trust, I listen to BBC. I occasionally look at Scandinavian papers online. Sad times for news outlet in US.

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  15. I normally read The Washington Post since I live in DC metro area. In car, I listen to BBC World Service. And I leave the shipping forecasts to Mrs. Bale.

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  16. "He who only knows only his side of the case, knows little of that". John Stuart Mill, On Liberty
    It is difficult sometimes to watch, listen to or read some of stuff that is out there because I tend to put it in the same category as Mrs.Bale's shipping forecast.

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  17. My eyes glaze over reading what some folks see as "objective". However to add a positive contribution I would point to the Spectator. It has wonderful columnists with a variety of interests; the book section is unparalleled; the wine writer is delightful; and finally it has a number of offbeat sections and correspondents you wouldn't find anywhere else.

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    1. Thank you for mentioning Spectator. I was not aware of it.

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    2. I've read The Speccie for decades . It's been up and down at times , but I love it to bits ! Dear Mary information has saved my butt many times .......... LOL

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    3. https://www.spectator.co.uk/category/life/dear-mary/

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    4. I recommend The American Spectator, especially the blogs on its website. Rod Dreher is now a writer of great influence, especially on religious matters. His "Benedict Option" book advocates community action as an alternative to political activism. It has been translated into several languages and is creating huge debate within the Roman Catholic church and other religions.

      Even you disagree with his views on social issues, Rod is always worth reading. His excoriating critiques of Donald Trump, from a traditional conservative perspective (small c emphasis), over the last two years should be read by every Republican supporter. He is a thoughtful man of principle and deserves great credit for practising what preaches. We need many more like him in our communities.

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  18. We used to watch BBC. However, we have been staying away from regularly watching any news for the past year as nothing seems to be real news anymore. There are a few websites we visit occasionally for news and world updates. We read our local newspaper for local news, arts, events. --Holly in PA

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  19. I too read The Economist. I think it's very convenient on my iPad.

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  20. The Financial Times is easily obtained in the US through delivery (granted, I live in a major market). I take a subscription to that, supplemented by my local paper for local focus. Weekly, the Economist.

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  21. Financial Times online daily

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  22. I live in Europe so it's easy to get non US news sources (since the new European data regulations came into place many US websites, including news sources, blocked readers from EU countries.) A few that I like include the Guardian (UK), FAZ (Germany) and as I live in Austria I look at ORF (Austrian broadcasting) and the major newspapers (Die Presse & Der Standard.) But still I am happy to be able to see news sources from the US.

    --EM

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  23. Spiked UK online. If only to see how far down the rabbit hole England has already gone. Makes me shudder . . .

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  24. I have given up on the news, and I am much happier for it. These days I only listen to the Shipping Forecast and Radio 3.

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  25. As a retired knuckle dragger who hung out with the spooks, I learned that all new outlets are biased. Biased to the audience,corporate and governmental sponsors/patrons. Look at their intended demographics and you can see their bias. If they do not cater to their audience (grab eyeballs) they will be out of job. If they do not please their sponsor/patrons they will be out of job due to a lack of resources.

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    1. way back when,
      a family member/young fledgling in the local tv news biz was told by head of local law enf. on what to broadcast- and they meant it, could enforce it-pulled the person in to make NO misunderstanding. makes one get religion real fast.

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  26. Interesting that no-one has mentioned the venerable CBC. Not what it used to be (missing Barbara Frum and Peter Gzowski), but still capable of doing decent reporting on foreign events.

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    1. The CBC is a relatively factual news outlet, as long as one is able to sort out its leftist bent. It's also amusing to watch/listen to thier reporters turn on their traditional 'friends' when those groups engage in activities the CBC views as abhorent - including those perpetrated by the Chinese and Russian governments, and their news services (which always express a very specific - if not immediately evident - bias). Many years ago I worked with a knuckle dragger who, with comic disdain, referred to the CBC as the Communist Broadcasting Corporation. Same fellow joked about the Toronto Star as the Red Star. Yes, there are biases in reporting on the part of most news outlets - hence the requirement to view more than one from a variety of perspectives, even in Canada...

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  27. News is not absolutely objective/free of bias; who controls what always influences "the facts". Hence the need for more than one source of news. Not to mention our personal news filters. Kudos to those who are willing to tune into Al Jazeera, Xinhua, Democracy Now, et al together with The Economist, BBC, DW and the NYT. Our era is the most privileged, and the first in the world's history, to be able to access such a wide array. Of course there should be corresponding education/ability for critical thinking on the part of those who access such information - but that is another soap box topic.

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    1. Yes, and no... Asking which services individuals read implies both an understanding of a need for more than one source of information; corroboration, if you will, as-well-as a kind of built-in critical thinking aspect of same. At least, that tends to be the approach in these parts, eh?

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    2. Agree, at least optimistically - 'in these parts', thankfully! Speaking generally, people can choose what they feel most comfortable with -- or not. We live in a privileged environment; some choose "not" by tuning in even to non-US news sources colored with the same lens. Seeking out other points of view with a kind of inquisitive, logical & analytical discernment requires a certain frame of mind - usually acquired through education; not necessarily formal. We were acquainted with a story of residents of Southern China, close enough to Hong Kong, who rig devices (at great risk) to ping the telecommunication towers in Hong Kong for news.

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    3. Some newspapers have long displayed their political leanings on the first page, right under the name. I'm not so sure that bias can be eliminated. Truly unbiased journalism would be something like reporting on the D-Day invasion in Normandy and not caring who won. Naturally there's another side of the story, as in how much discretion you would or should exercise in reporting things that are bad. Casualty figures in wars, bungled police work, violence between employers and employees and so on. I don't imagine that it's easy.

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  28. The Spectator and the Tatler. The Daily Telegraph online.

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