Saturday, September 8, 2018

Out and About











































































18 comments:

  1. Thank you for such a variety of wonderful pictures that I can spend some time with. While I do appreciate the pictures themselves and I don't want to seem too Bob Hopeish, I must admit they prompt me to reminisce which I find quite enjoyable at times. Maybe my idea of nostalgia is too expansive but I include thoughts of places I'd like to have gone, things I'd liked to have done and things I'd love to have seen. I always remember that A.E. Housman was not really a Shropshire Lad. Thank you again for sharing the things you've seen and captured to share with us.

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  2. Beautiful end-of-summer curation of images. Now I'm ready for autumn.

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  3. This photo essay wonderfully captures late summer. There are the last of the summer tomatoes and the late, pale blue blossoms of hydrangeas poking their heads out in one last burst of restrained exuberance. And among my favorites, zinnias — those wonderfully happy flowers — and the black-faced sheep.

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  4. So lovely. Except for the temperature. Wow!

    MaryAnne

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  5. Ah, September. No longer summer. Not yet autumn. Middle age. Some days still at your prime, but slowing down. I have never understood how anyone can live in a place without dramatic seasonal changes, without freezing winters, muddy springs, and glorious summers and autumns. Thanks for the photos.

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    1. Once you live somewhere where the winters are mild, you can never go back to the land of harsh winters. They seem absolutely brutal. And life there is much harder in during that time of year

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    2. I agree with Chris Westerman about becoming accustomed to milder winters. I was raised in Southern California, and real winters are difficult for me. I lived in Connecticut for eight years, and by February I would be in such a funk. I'm in Virginia now, and even though our winters are milder than other places, I wish they would end sooner. Sometimes we have snow in March, and I'm never pleased about that.

      Jacqueline

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    3. Some of us miss the colder winters (or as some call them "harsh winters.") Where others see "brutality," we see freshness, invigoration, and a time for deep introspection and the indoor activities we neglect in the hotter months.

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    4. What you call milder winters are nice but, alas, they don't last long enough. And the flip side is you get harsh summers, at least here in Atlanta. I was at a neighborhood festival Saturday morning and had to leave after an hour because the heat and humidity were crippling and I started feeling sick. And fall is arriving at least a month later now than when I moved here about 30 years ago. I have lived in both harsh summers and harsh winters and I prefer harsh winters. But happily we are all different. There is something somewhere for everyone. :-) Thanks for the lovely photos, as always, Muffy!

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  6. Such wonderful images. Thank you so very much!

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  7. Again...…...ahhhhhhhh. Thank you.

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  8. Perfect for a Sunday morning (or anytime for that matter ) !

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  9. I know that 4 Bouys Wagoneer! I seen it here in Greenwich. Beautiful pictures! The zinnias remind me of my late mother and brought a smile to my face this morning.

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  10. The Redfield House caught my eye. I've been by that house in Madison numerous times over the years. If I recall correctly, the family immigrated from England on the Mayflower eighty years earlier. They had large families with 10 and 12 kids. Most Americans with the name Redfield can trace it back to this family and, thus, the Mayflower.

    Aiken

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  11. When future generations want to know what New England daily life was like in the first part of the 21st Century, they need look no further than your consistently wonderful photographs. Obviously, a talented family tradition at work and on display here.

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  12. We might also see the beauty of a landscape dominated by whites, blues, silvers and greys. And if we are among the most fortunate we might cherish memories of the sound of a hard rubber disc meeting ash wood, of the scraping of cold steel underfoot into showers of ice shavings, the sound of the wind in the trees and perhaps the scent of branches burning in a shoreline bonfire.

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  13. Out and Abouts are my favorite. Simple, peaceful scenes of daily life. Everybody doing their thing with some detailed perspective of the little things. Love it!! --Holly in PA

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