Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Autumn Wardrobe Essentials?

Photos by Salt Water New England
Question for the Community:
What are your core clothing items for Autumn - things that you would want to replace almost immediately if lost - either for town or country?





57 comments:

  1. Navy blue wool turtleneck

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  2. Thick corduroys and moleskins, Shetland sweaters, tweed jackets.

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  3. Barbour--Beaufort or Bedale
    Aran sweaters
    A good blazer
    Bean boots
    Dubarry boots
    Navy cashmere sweater

    And many more, but these are my absolute must-haves.

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  4. Khaki pants, white turtleneck, and navy Geiger jacket w/cashmere scarf. Perfect!

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  5. Good quality sweaters, turtlenecks, quilted jacket, boots (I like different brands, Ugg, Dubarry, Gentle Souls), and some well-worn, soft sweatshirts. Still trying to find a Barbour to fit me. Welcome Autumn!

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    1. so much better than uggs boots- https://www.oldfriendfootwear.com/casuals-3

      slippers are superior
      https://www.oldfriendfootwear.com/

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  6. Covert coat
    Paddock jacket
    Waxed cotton jacket
    Tweed jackets
    Tattersall shirts
    Shetland jumpers
    Moleskin and corduroy trousers
    Country boots

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  7. Mountain parka, Bean duck boots, sweaters. (Oh, and the 4th photo down shows 138 Main St., Wiscasset, Maine.)

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  8. Many wool and cashmere sweaters
    Leather ankle boots
    Northern Watters Knitwear wool shawl
    Chunky knit wool Cowichan sweater

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  9. Sweaters! Crew, cardigans, turtleneck, just not those “open cardigan “ ones.
    Corduroy pants, duck boots. Field jacket.

    MaryAnne

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    1. I used to feel that way about open cardigans although as fall has gotten warmer I find they are very practical as they are super easy to throw on in the morning when it's cooler and remove as the day gets warmer-- and can be treated a but like a blazer and dressed up with pearls or a nice scarf.

      Sweaters (I just wish it would get cool enough to wear them!), fleece, plaid anything, Bean boots, scarves, turtlenecks, and dark jeans (they go well with navy).

      As it is still very warm where I live (even though it is September, a time when it used to be cooler) my French sailor shirts are an early fall staple as they can be worn with a cardigan over them, and then the cardigan removed as the day heats up.

      --EM

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    2. I really disliked the open cardigans too until I discovered "Magnebuttons" (the plain ones). Two very strong magnets which can be used to keep the cardigans together. Great for scarves too.

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  10. Irish sweater bought in the summer of '88.

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  11. Replies
    1. Yes! Those are great shoes, well made and highly practical and handsome

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  12. Tweed sport coats, Harris and herringbone. Camel hair sport coat. Sweaters. Corduroy trousers.

    Favorite time of the year. Could live in Autumn all year long.

    The Concord Diaspora

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  13. Those puffer jackets that fold into their own pouch & weigh nothing; Smartwool socks; base layer silk turtlenecks; Harris tweed jacket; ponte skinny trousers; cashmere scarf; Barbour wide brim waxed hat; Bean boots.

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  14. A lot of what has already said plus Rugby Shirts.

    David J Cooper

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    1. At least there are two of us! I like the old wide stripe designs.

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  15. switch to bostons from arizonas

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    1. Are you thinking Birkies? Or geography?

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  16. Bean duck boots, Barbour jackets, vintage Bean wool sweaters!

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  17. Love Fair Isle sweaters but really having hard time finding them. Love the type with the fancy yoke and the plain body but good luck finding one of those. Also I like long sleeved sweaters because I want to be warm. Also muted heather colors are so pretty for fall. Well, a gal can dream . . .

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    1. O'Connell's Clothing has lovely Fair Isle sweaters!
      http://www.oconnellsclothing.com/Sweaters-c-301/

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    2. One of my favorite winter brands, Skhoop, is introducing Fair Isle sweaters on 10/1 - I hope they don't disappoint!

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  18. I'm surprised no one mentioned the classic trench coat! I love my khaki, single-breasted, hooded trench coat and wear it more in the fall than the spring by a long shot. I find the hood is critical in Maine with our inevitable rain from the hurricanes down south. My Pendleton has lasted nicely through the years and is my most-worn coat ever, perhaps.

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    1. Top quality trench coats, especially British made, are very expensive. Grenfell of London, one of the best, now charges £775. That's a lot of cash to find for an immediate replacement (the thread subject) unless it's covered by insurance.

      I have an old Aquascutum trench coat but I would hesitate to replace it. Instead I'd probably choose a long Barbour, a Border or Northumbria. It would better option financially and practically as you can add matching hoods and liners or even gaiters.

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    2. Quality trench coats have apparently always been expensive. In a list of officers' equipment advised for France in (presumably) 1917, a Burberry coat, fleece-lined, was listed as costing $37.50. In today's money, that translates into between $675 and $800. But the Sears, Roebuck catalog of military equipment, an officer's trench coat is listed at $21, but not fleece lined. That was when a trench coat was something actually worn in the trenches. For comparison, an officer's winter weight OD uniform (coat and pants with insignia) cost $45.00. An enlisted man's uniform was $10.00.

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  19. Re-watching the movie "Dead Poets Society"

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  20. Has LL Bean actually ever referred to Bean boots or the Maine hunting shoe as duck boots?

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    1. Yes. Taken from their website: "Often imitated, but never duplicated, L.L.Bean duck boots have been customer favorites since 1912 when our founder, Leon Leonwood Bean, returned from a hunting trip with cold, wet feet and a revolutionary idea. By combining rubber bottoms with soft leather uppers, he created a waterproof, non-slip boot like no other. Today, our legendary duck shoes are still handcrafted here in Maine, one pair at a time. Over the years, our line up of Maine duck boots has grown to include a range of performance features like Thinsulate insulation for winter warmth, cozy shearling and waterproof Gore-Tex linings, all with the same unmistakable quality as our original L.L.Bean Boots. While many duck boots on the market might look similar to L.L.Bean Boots, they lack the attention to detail and the premium-quality materials that have allowed ours to stand the test of time."

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  21. Re-watching the movie "The Shooting Party" or "Remains of the Day."

    My fall uniform - tan cords or khakis, button down oxfords or chamois shirts, dirty bucks or chukka boots, sweaters (wool or cotton, crew or v-neck) and a field coat.

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    1. I have never watched The Shooting Party but will do so; looks terrific. For me, Hannah and Her Sisters is a great fall movie. In literature, the first half-dozen pages of Salinger’s Franny and Zooey are beautifully evocative of an Ivy League campus on football weekend.

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    2. The Shooting Party - a story about a pre-WWI country house weekend; sartorially classic English Country Life. However (no spoiler) see it when you will be with friends & loved ones afterwards who have not seen it.

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  22. This has to do with this thread but may be any additional thread. I have a wool LL Bean sweater and a wool sweater from Swalsdale Woollens which I like to wear in the fall. They itch my skin so I wear a turtleneck under them so they do not irritate the neck. Can anybody recommend another way other than the turtleneck?

    Ken

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    1. I hear you. I have a vintage LL Bean Norwegian sweater that's about as soft as steel wool next to human skin. I don't want the thing anywhere close to touching my skin. My solution: Simply wear a long sleeve oxford cloth or flannel shirt with a standard collar underneath the scratchy sweater.

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  23. Barbour jacket (just like that Norfolk Terrier in Central Park, only mine is bigger). And socks! - because Topsiders are giving way to Fall-appropriate footwear.

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  24. Salt and pepper cords bought in the 80's from Talbots. Knee went through a few years ago and have yet to find a replacement. They were truly lovely and always received compliments and inquiries as to where I bought them. Any suggestions would be appreciated! PA

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  25. I have never heard of duck boots. I wore ll bean boots for 40 years until every other person on the street started wearing them. Never knew they were street wear.
    Aside from that, the quality had begun to go very much downhill.

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  26. Tweed sports jacket(s, corduroy (dress) pants, and suede brogues/wingtips.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich

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  27. Personally, couldn't do fall without...
    Alden Indy Boots (not fall until it feels appropriate to wear these)
    Alden longwings
    APC raw denim (probably not a lot of denim fans here, but a pair of washed and broken in denim paired with Aldens is perfect)
    Woolrich flannels
    LL Bean wool sweater
    Barn Jacket
    Barbour Bedale
    Patagonia sweater vests and fleeces
    and, my brown Cafe Racer style motorcycle leather jacket

    I find that bourbon and scotch are also indispensable.

    And, this hasn't been mentioned, but fall is the absolute best time to bring out colognes and scents (for men, at least). Something about the crisp air, leaves, and hint of chimney smoke that makes the darker, leathery, tobacco, sandalwood and brooding type scents so appropriate. Too many to list, but always a joy to incorporate these into a fall night out.

    When I retire, I think I may own homes in each hemisphere just so that I can experience fall twice a year. By far my favorite season.

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  28. Not essential and really only for when it's really cold, but I like Pendleton wool shirts. I think I have at least a half-dozen, most of which are washable. One is so fine you wouldn't think it was even wool. Those and Filson pants.

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  29. May I opt out of commenting on clothing and add this bit from another Southern kid: Autumn was her happiest season. There was an expectancy about its sounds and shapes: the distant thunk pomp of leather and young bodies on the practice field near her house made her think of bands and cold Coca-Colas, parched peanuts and the sight of people's breath in the air. There was even something to look forward to when school started - renewals of old feuds and friendships, weeks of learning again what one half forgot in the long summer. Fall was hot-supper time with everything to eat one missed in the morning when too sleepy to enjoy it."
    ― Harper Lee, Go Set a Watchman

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  30. I always find it a pleasurable autumn ritual to put away my summer things (linen shirts/pants, seersucker, madras jackets/shorts, straw fedoras, Sebago boat shoes, tropic-weight LL Bean trousers, Brookscool Blazers, Leather Man Ltd. novelty belts), and to break out the shetlands, tweeds, flannels, and Orvis Super Cords. Yes, and as someone mentioned, wool socks reappear, too.

    My Clan Aran Irish Fisherman Sweater from the Aran Sweater Market is also awoken from its warm weather slumber – as are my Patagonias and LL Bean Norwegian Sweaters (the wool/rayon blends which are better wearing and looking than the newer all wool versions.) I’ve had to go to eBay to turn back the clock on these, and fortunately mint condition ones from the heyday 1980s are still readily available and quite reasonable.

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  31. Bring out the Barrie’s, “Gongha boots. The reliable scarves. The sweaters. Made in USA, Italy, or England. A few from Peru.

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  32. Gumshoes, lined chinos, & button-down flannel shirts.
    Wish I could find a replacement for my “Hunting Orange” coloured chamois shirt.
    (Also looking for new supplier for the lined chinos; Bean’s quality has really dropped on theirs.)

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  33. Light tee shirts, polo shirts, lightweight trousers, sock less moccasins. I live in Texas. It was 96 Tuesday. Seriously though, when the heat finally breaks, and it doesn't break like here like it does in the north, I find medium weight henleys, long sleeve t shirts, heavier weight khakis being the norm.

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  34. Thin turtlenecks in red, marigold, white, gray, and navy
    Plaid skirts! I have one wool wrap one that I lived in last year, in navy. Looking for a red tartan one this year.
    A pair of thick, navy riding-style pants. Great for when I'm not in the mood for a skirt (and I'm trying to wear jeans less often)
    My cordovan Bass Weejuns
    A green field jacket
    Navy tights
    Bean boots
    Navy blazer; the weather has been super inconsistent here, so it's great to throw on over a thinner top. Also instantly brings my plainest outfits together.
    Lastly, anything that makes me feel like Ali McGraw from Love Story

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  35. I can't do fall without my:
    - Grenfell Field Coat
    - Hucklecote Tweed Coat
    - 4 dollar Totes shoe galoshes
    - Le Chameau Wellies and Bean gumboots
    - Barn Jackets from Lands End (splattered with mud)
    - Schoolboy scarves from J. Press

    Some shameful things from my New England upbringing (I'm a man in my late twenties so not always the most age-appropriate) :

    - Ridiculous dad jeans (cheap, ill fitting, high waisted)
    - Lesbian art teacher style shoes (slip on suede clogs from Land's End, usually)
    - torn and tattered beige pro keds
    - inherited 80s windbreaker with elastic waist
    - Lots of 'aztec' printed fleeces, windbreakers and sweaters

    Here in the south, I've learned that these plain as day New Englander farmers' market staples are met with shock and confusion.

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  36. It was lost and I can't replace it. Well, I can't locate a replacement. Not a hunter and not really an outdoorsman but love to be out of doors in all types of weather - cold, windy and rainy. I grew up wearing a tan Jones Style cap/hat when as a kid, my dad and I were just "being in the woods" but with my city life and some major moves, I no longer have my favorite and now I'm back home in a small town and walking in the woods and a tan Jones Style cap would be good for me in many ways

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