Sunday, August 26, 2018

Monarch

Photo by Salt Water New England


7 comments:

  1. A monarch on a zinnia - how lovely! The monarch population has sadly declined more than 90 percent since the 1990s. I planted milkweed on the hillside behind the house in hopes of providing a nursery for them, and have lots of butterfly and bee friendly flowers in the garden, on which I use no chemicals. I enjoy seeing these creatures in the yard as much as I enjoy the birds that visit.

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  2. Bitsy, we were talking about this very thing at church this morning.

    Last week during services by the sea I watched a Monarch butterfly fly out over the ocean and circled above as if it was a graceful bird. It went up so high I lost sight of it until it circled back down and then flew around the congregation.

    I would like to plant some milkweed. Do you have any suggestions for successful planting? I'm in Maine...

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    Replies
    1. Hi Averyl — There are over 100 varieties of milkweed, and it’s best to plant what is native to one’s locale. I got seeds at a local native plant sale. This website has information, including seeds, specific to Maine (http://wildseedproject.net/2016/03/monarchs-and-milkweed/). You might also try the local chapter of the New England Wild Flower Society. Happy planting!

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  3. Sounds like a very commendable and responsible church.

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  4. Lovely photo. So glad we have lots of milkweed in our nearby meadow.

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  5. VOTE. Google Republicans and pesticides.

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  6. Was contemplating removing some old overgrown shrubs and replacing them with butterfly bushes next Spring. Now I will see if I can locate some milkweed seeds too!

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