Monday, August 6, 2018

Does J. Press Have a Future in the Northeast?

J. Press' Cambridge Store - Photos by Salt Water New England
 A reader sent a note that J. Press was closing its Cambridge location <http://www.mr-mag.com/j-press-to-close-its-cambridge-store/>.  This is in addition to the displacement of both of their New Haven and New York stores.  Those who have shopped at the various location also noted a lack of sizes and other stock issues.  The York Street line was clearly a failure on all counts.

With the erosion of the suit and tie as a business staple (see The New Business Uniform), and their congenital inability to grow into tangential areas, one has to wonder if J. Press has a future.  Alternatively, perhaps, J. Press - if the Washington D.C. store is doing well, and given a significant fan base being below the Mason–Dixon line - will increasingly become more of a Southern brand.  Would it be more at home in a thriving community similar to Charleston?

Or does J. Press still have a path to success in Ivy League cities?



Old New York Store

Temporary New Haven Store

Original York Street Location (as of a few weeks ago)

From the Archives

Father Wearing J. Press

Father Wearing J. Press

68 comments:

  1. Their main line of business these days seems to be in Asia, especially Japan.

    Aiken

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    1. Question is: do their original American outposts authenticate their brand overseas? Or does simply the NYC simply check that box these days?

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  2. This is very sad news, even if only for purely sentimental reasons. I can still smell the Cambridge store decades later, if I close my eyes, and shopping there was a unique experience. In a way, this is an even more dramatic event than the closing and re-opening of the New York store. RIP.

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  3. J. Press is owned by a Japanese company where Ivy/Trad/Prep is still very popular (and becoming more popular). When their NYC location closed, felt the city lost an important icon. I was very glad to see them come back and now get all my shirts and suits (which are MTM) from them. I hope they never leave us because it's nearly impossible to get a good 3/2 roll these days.

    For what it's worth, the team at the NYC store is great and I always feel welcomed and appreciated there.

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  4. I hope so, but it's going to be very close. The fact that most people no longer wear suits to work has hit all of the upscale mens' retailers pretty hard. The market is much smaller now.

    Also, the Ivy/Trad look that used to set J. Press apart isn't as... recognizable... any more, now that fewer people are wearing suits. When suits were ubiquitous in the white-collar workplace, Ivy/Trad was a distinct look. But now that few people were suits, someone in a J. Press suit looks like... someone in a suit. The cut and colors of the J. Press suit are still different but they aren't as noticeable.

    I still buy wool slacks, khakis, socks, suspenders and other accessories from J. Press. I have some of their shirts too. The quality of the shirts is outstanding. In fact, all of their merchandise is outstanding. To be honest I don't like J. Press ties. They don't wear that well, and the BB ties have a coating that gives them a little bit of a sheen and makes them look more cheerful. Maybe understatement is preferable but I prefer ties that are a little bit cheerful, they are a way to brighten people's day.

    I'd like to try a J. Press sportcoat but I have my sportcoats, suits and blazers made by a tailor so I probably won't buy one from J. Press. (The fact that people aren't wearing suits any more has also hit the tailors pretty hard, and their prices have decreased quite a bit -- you can spend $1100 for a good quality suit at BB or J. Press, or you can spend $1500 for a custom made suit made by a tailor.)

    Despite all this, I am cautiously optimistic about the future of J. Press. They seem to be turning themselves in to a "curated" mens' store, one with carefully selected merchandise, and that seems like a good strategy IMO. They have a good internet presence, too. A fair number of older menswear stores have made the transition to a web-based model -- Ben Silver, the Shoe Mart -- and J. Press seems like a good candidate.

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  5. A sad sign of the times here in the USA. There definitely is a location aspect to a lot of the survival of these great stores. Unfortunately, as society erodes, so does it's wardrobe. --Holly in PA

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    1. “Unfortunately, as society erodes, so does its wardrobe.” How true.

      Maybe J Press could stem the tide of their decline by making MAGA hats, preferably out of tweed. Tell me true, who wouldn't want a tweed MAGA hat?

      Aiken

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  6. The question put is whether the business has a future in Ivy League cities. Leaving aside for the moment an entirely separate debate as to whether Hanover resembles an semi-inhabited village somewhere in Michigan, the question in turn requires inquiry whether the largest contingent of "Ivy League" humans resident in such cities, to wit, the undergraduates, will shop at J. Press.

    To ask these questions is to painfully disclose the moderator's apparent lack of knowledge regarding the make-up of today's undergraduates attending Ivy League universities, and Princeton. With the possible exception of Princeton if we agree to include it as a school in a "city", the vast majority of today's undergraduates are comprised of (i) women; (ii) people of color; (iii) people from foreign nations, notably the People's Republic of China; and (iv) just regular kids from places like Boise, Austin and Albany. Women can't shop at J. Press, last time I looked. The remaining groups, which, along with women, constitute the overwhelming majority of undergraduates, either have never heard of J. Press and never will, or can't afford clothing such as is offered, or, more likely, wouldn't be caught dead or alive in J. Press attire.

    Additionally, for that small majority of male undergraduates who may be aware of J. Press because they recall seeing a label in the Grandfather's closet, wearing "Prep" is a sure plan to exploit, not check, your privilege. Exploiting privilege these days is a fast form of self-destruction at a place like Brown or Columbia.

    Prep is white, wealthy and privileged, for the most part. The Ivy League universities no longer are bastions of any of that, with the exception of Princeton, which continues to spawn the most oleaginous type of young-investment banker on the make of any college anywhere.

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    1. If we’re using the defining characterization “white, wealthy and privileged”, Princeton hardly achieves that. The largest portion of income variants in Princeton is $30,000 or below in yearly income. This is the lowest income variant recorded in their demographics, and makes up 30% of the student body, more than any other. Yale, coincidentally, has 41% of their student body in the highest income variant ($110,000 or above in yearly income). This is largest income variant proportionally at Yale. Of the big three, Yale succeeds most in fitting the definition of the J. Press customer defined as being “rich, wealthy and privileged”. Of all of the Ivy League universities, it is, perhaps, Dartmouth, with 51% of the student body being of the highest income variant. The point is, of course, that as wonderfully mindful it is for the Ivy League to democratize and become more inclusive, so too do we lose stores like J. Press. Worth it? Yes, but still sad, nonetheless.

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    2. I think it should be noted that while many of these prestigious colleges and universities have diversified their student body in terms of racial and gender makeup, many have stayed just as out of reach from middle and working class people as they used to be. Some have even become less accessible, due to a reinforcement of legacy admissions and administrations that now focus less on funding academics and campus life properly, and more on short term endowment growth (trust me I used to work in development at an Ivy). Harvard in particular is still a very privileged school based on the class makeup of its student body (over 90% of its undergraduate students come from families earning over $190k a year) and the largest area they come from is Massachusetts, so I do not buy the argument that students come from "regular" places like Boise. If they do, they're the children of educated high earners, who are likely also Harvard alums.

      As a preppy New Englander who graduated from a Northeast liberal arts school in this most recent decade, I also never personally experienced any ire aimed at me for not "checking" my privilege. In my experience, living by the understated New England Yankee mantra of less is more, and judge a person on the content of their character, I found most of my fellow student body was quite welcoming, even if they were "different" than me. The only truly rude and unpleasant students I came across on campus were the truly ultra-wealthy students (usually from Manhattan), who would openly mock you at parties and events because you didn't do things like: fly to Japan to go clothes shopping for the weekend, or have a wardrobe outfit that cost less than their pearl bracelet.

      It's absolutely true that J. Press must wrestle with the dated styles they have. Trust me, I love them and frequent the Cambridge shop. They are wonderful people. But as a younger man I for the life of me cannot find a pair of slacks that isn't what we call "grandpa" cut, aka too short in the leg and wide in the seat. That and everyone else I know, of all ages, who shop in their Cambridge store have no attachment to the York Street brand, even if we enjoy some of their more casual clothing options. Their other issue as mentioned has been a lack of women's/unisex clothing. My wife wears my J. Press button downs to work quite often, but will never personally shop there because they don't carry any pants or coats that fit her.

      I think the biggest thing this conversation is missing is the fact that Harvard Square is being bought up by Harvard's own real estate department and by Harvard graduate (and billionaire) Gerald Chan. Both Chan and Harvard Real estate have been causing commercial rents to skyrocket, sometimes in double digit cost raises each year, and the result has been a decimation of much of the small businesses in Harvard Square, ranging form clothiers to bookstores to hole in the wall pubs. Harvard's administration is aware their actions are causing this breakdown in the Square's economic diversity, but they don't really mind because of how many tourist flock to Harvard's own campus tours and their campus shop.

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    3. Berkeley's College Avenue is the only street in a university town that I know of where there is an ordinance requiring mostly sole proprietorship. That is the reason the street has an eclectic small town feel, and wonderful places thrive like the Mrs Dalloway book store. The neighborhood residents, albeit well heeled and able to shop most anywhere, support these local stores. Applications for new businesses are scrutinized in town hall meetings & by the council. It does take a village.

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    4. Evan, thanks for one of the most well-written, non-combative, and informative comments I've read here in ages. There's no shortage of commenters on this blog ready to shout, whether they have anything worthwhile to say or not, but comments like yours remind us of the value of smart commenters who don't shout, and do have something worthwhile to say. Kudos.

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    5. Evan what you are saying is interesting. However, changing what they are selling turns J Press into something else.
      Styles change. Everything changes. There still are quite a few of us out here who want to stick with what we are wearing.
      Even the style of clothes being discussed [what ever you chose to call it] has evolved over the decades.
      Can J Press survive as is? I doubt it. Sad to see one of our last options fade away.

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    6. Evan, I agree with you that openly judgmental people often are wealthy people from Manhattan. However, it’s also the not-so-wealthy strivers, and working class New England locals, too. We can all be guilty of it.

      I grew up in Manhattan and went to a private/prep school via both a needs based and merit scholarship. Since I was not wealthy like the majority of my classmates it was a very challenging time for me.

      I went to undergrad and grad Liberal Arts schools in New England. Even though I did not grow up wealthy I had to and continue to have to check my own assumptions about wealthy people and privilege, whether from New England, New York or anyplace, really. Being judgmental can go both ways and it’s sad when friendships aren’t formed due to perceived barriers that don’t exist most often due to insecurity.

      So back to J. Press, not everyone can afford to shop there and that has absolutely nothing to do with character or taste. Nothing.

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    7. Averyl, I think we are agreeing more than we are disagreeing here. The point I was trying to make was to dispel the notion that these college towns and cities are unfavorable to preppy establishments, or to prep-identified people on campus. As such a self-identified person who graduated from a liberal arts college this most recent decade, I simply didn't have any unwelcoming experience of that kind in college. My college roommates were: the 7th and youngest child of two high school teachers, a young man who had grown up in a trailer park and was attending on academic scholarship, and a New Canaan CT son of a banking executive. We all bonded very closely and are still good friends.

      I also believe judgements can go both ways when talking about privilege, but I believe that if you happen to have privilege and societal power, it's best to use it for good, and to treat others with respect (my grandparent's generation called this noblesse oblige but my generation seems intent on finding other definitions of it). I am not saying all the well off Manhattanite college students I encountered were snobs (the vast majority were not), but I am saying it is a pity when someone with privilege does not consider it a duty to use it for the good of their own communities.

      As for J. Press and its clothing, I think the point that Salt Water New England has made before is that the York Street clothing J. Press has sold (which was sort of their attempt at appealing to younger professionals) didn't pan out. Of the other people my age I know who frequent J. Press, none of us buy the York label. We do buy their classic suits, blazers, sport coats, sweaters, ties, etc. I'm sure there is more to the story about their Cambridge store closing, but I do have the feeling a large part of the decision likely came down to Harvard's administration, and the Chan family buying up half of Harvard Square in the last decade. I worked in Harvard Square from 2012 to 2014, and lived in the Cambridge/Boston area for much of the last 2 decades. I watched many of my favorite bookstores and hole in the wall pubs shut down, and all of them cited the exorbitant increases in commercial rents and customer traffic disruption that are a result of Harvard University and the Chan family's encroachment into the Square itself. Even The Andover Shop in Cambridge is for sale, and the proprietors have publicly cited being adjacent to Harvard's Smith Center construction/renovation as their main revenue loss of late (I should note that J. Press is across the street from said construction).

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    8. Evan, I agree that we are mostly agreeing. :) I found your comments to be thought-provoking and well written. I was calling myself out for having in the past been overly judge-y about privileged people I never met. My closing comment wasn't directed at you but those who would look down upon someone who would shop online/outlets as somehow beneath them when often economics are at play. I went through that in my prep school.

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  7. J Press could not easily succeed in Charleston. Ben Silver owns that market segment in Charleston. However, J Press might succeed in some other southern college towns, for example Charlottesville. Albemarle County has a compatible wealthy demographic and UVa is still very Prep.

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  8. I wonder who owns that building? Harvard?

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    1. According to public records, "45 Dunster Street, LLC" which curiously shares an address with the Fly. . .

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  9. I have shopped J Press in New Haven since high school and although mow I only purchase shirts
    and ties I hope they will be around here for some time. Funny how as one gets older quality and
    Classic looks become even more important to maintain.

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  10. Probably not in Ivy League cities without heavy support from an international clientele.The demise of J Press means its traditional patrons no longer choose to provide custom. Period. Ivy apparel lives, just not the way it was. Sorry to hear about the store in Cambridge. I remember accompanying my then boyfriend who used to get kitted out every year.

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  11. With the decline in taste and class I doubt that any store selling anything resembling decent men's clothing will survive.
    We shall have to go back to custom tailoring once again.
    Lets hope the tide will turn.

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    1. I quite agree. Father always insisted upon custom tailoring. I have slipped in recent years; I never really cared for the tailor touching me. However, with the demise of J. Press, I shall have to put on a good face and call the tailor. He is still on a family retainer, I am told. Doesn't everyone have a family tailor? I think most of them came over from Italy, but I'm not really sure.

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  12. That is very sad news but it seems that JPress has stagnated. The website needs to be updated for the smartphone shoppers. The photographs are terrible and don't sell the garments. The jackets don't even fit the models properly, too tight or too short.

    Perhaps the management needs an overhaul too. North Eastern customers may be moving to competitors such as the Andover Shop, Mercer, BB or O'Connell's. North and South Carolina or even Georgia could be fertile territory for J. Press but it needs to get it act together first.

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  13. Ken how many men who shop online buy suits? Almost none. If you need a website to buy what J Press sells you are not interested in what they are selling.
    If it needs to be updated to sell it is not what people want. Sad but probably true.

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    1. A lot more than you, Mr/Ms Anonymous think. You have a very narrow and out-dated mindset. As I live in England, I can only buy from J Press via its website which has a poor layout and functionality.

      How many people in the US have visited Cordings' shops in London and Harrogate? Not many but the company, which advertises on this site, is greatly increasing its sales to the US via its website.

      What is really sad is that J Press seems to be managed by people who think like you.

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    2. Wow that is extremely judgemental! I cant imagine buying coats and pants online without trying them on.
      I hope they survive to help people "like me" who have supported them and shopped there for three generations.
      As for narrow minded, you do not know anything about me or my mindset.
      Or, what creates my tastes and habits.

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    3. I can tell a lot about someone's mindset by what they post. You wrote. "If you need a website to buy what J Press sells you are not interested in what they are selling." That comment was extremely judgemental, especially of those who want to buy J Press's merchandise but cannot visit one the company's stores.

      There are a lot of people who live in remote or rural areas who must buy clothes without trying them on. You obviously think that they should travel long distances, at considerable time and monetary expense, to bricks and monitor stores. Unlike you, I think that they should be able buy from well-designed and attractive websites. Thankfully, well-run companies like Cordings agree with me.

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    4. You judged me as a person. I wish you luck

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  14. Thought I would take advantage of a Jos A Bank deal buy one get one free a few years ago. Ugh. Suits were OK but their in house tailor butchered them. Tried a couple times to get them reworked.

    Lesson learned.

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  15. Actually online everything is the way of the future. The world of biometrics is, as in with all things AI and computer driven, nothing short of amazing and, uh, scary for an old codger like me. How about stepping into a booth that scans your measurements and produces a garmet that fits you like a glove - Jeeves will help you pick out fabrics and colors that suit you; the niceties of tailoring and customer service will all be there; it will just all be virtual. You get your apparel in a week (nod to QA) - beautifully packaged, a thank you note from Jeeves and a complimentary gift that you absolutely love (they have profiled you for cross-selling). Oh, and if anything needs mending, have it dropped off at a nearby drop off point or contact Jeeves who will send you prepaid everything - get it back perfectly repaired in a blink. Maybe there will be a bumper sticker that will say 'I'd rather be at J Press' one day, but I rather be sailing.

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  16. I rest my case. We are doomed.

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  17. Very sad JPress continues to lose market share and has to close its stores.
    Let's hope for a rebirth of wanting to dress up and look classic again.
    The pendulum always swings back.

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  18. Regrettably, I predict that within ten years J. Press will be gone from the U.S. altogether. There are factors external to the company (contemporary style preferences, shift to e-commerce) as well as factors internal to the company (stock issues, missteps with design) to blame.

    I am fascinated by how O’Connell’s appears to chug along, and I begin to wonder if the future of Ivy style will be dominated not be corporations who must deliver a return to investors, but rather by enthusiasts who are in it for love.

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  19. I've never been in a J. Press store but stores like that have been disappearing one by one over the last 30 or 40 years, for all the same reasons. The ones I'm think of were for the most part, independent, and sold American-made products. Anything independent is rare these days, as well as someone selling something made in this country. But chiefly, I think, it reflects changes in styles. There used to be men's shops (and women's shops, too) even in the smallest towns that catered to those who were careful in how they dressed. The rest went to Sears. There have always been the big department stores, too. Lord & Taylor was a wonderful place for men's clothing and for all I know, it still may be. But I think all the shops that flourished in college towns are gone now. College students all dress like they do in California and Florida. Locally (D.C. area), there was the Georgetown University Shop. Come to think of it, all the locally owned department stores are gone, too.

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  20. There aren't enough of us left that care, let alone defend the traditions and values that are fast fleeting. Enjoy what's left as long as you can.


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  21. I live in DC and avoid going into the J Press store here because I have not had good luck with their salesmen. I do order J Press clothes (shirts) online, however. When buying sports coats, pants, and ties, I drop by Wm Fox, a family-owned men’s clothing store that has been in the city for decades.

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  22. Yesterday's catalog sales are today's on-line sales.

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  23. "Good clothes open all doors." Thomas Fuller's quote from 17th century. It was true then, it is true now. If in doubt, ask Mark Zuckerberg. Wonder where he bought the suit he wore for his Congressional testimony?

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    1. but... what if you live in a nudist colony?

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  24. "Grandpa pants?!"

    I notice that eBay does a brisk business with J Press items. Maybe it's all the grandpas out there bidding away, who knows. Regardless, there is an active demand.

    Aiken

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  25. Thumper said, "If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all".

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  26. Thumper should have a heart-to-hear with your president.

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  27. Very appropriate statement..."As society erodes, so does it's wardrobe". A whole generation is coming along that know nothing but t-shirts, shorts, and flip-flops. The older I get the more thankful I am that I grew up in the 50's and 60's wearing khakis,buttondowns, crewnecks, etc and have never stopped. I was able to get to the Cambridge J Press on a few occasions and it always felt like Mecca to me. Old wood, the smell of pipe tobacco, a Harvard football helmet, and plaid wallpaper; just glorious. I felt like I was back in the 50's or 60's. Very sad that I won't get to experience that again.

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    1. Pity you didn't have a chance to experience frock coats, knickerbockers, raccoon coats or Norfolk jackets. Remember that at one time, a shirt was considered an undergarment. Times change.

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    2. I would love to have worn a raccoon coat to a Harvard-Yale game.

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    3. The commenter is indulging in a bit of harmless nostalgia. Appreciating old things gives us a sense of continuity and connectedness. It’s also a nod of respect to those who have gone before.

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    4. My wife's grandfather (on her mother's side) was employed at a boy's boarding school in Lynchburg, Virginia (VES). She says he wore a suit everyday even after retirement. He also had a straw boater that we have now, that he wore in the summer. The label says it came from a men's shop (of the sort that no longer exists) in Alexandria, Virginia. It's thicker than I would have imagined. He passed away in 1963. My wife also remembers riding with him in his 1928 Ford, the only car he ever owned.

      Many students were still "dressing up" frequently when I was in college in a style that was called collegiate rather than preppy. I started in the fall of 1964 but I was in the army for three years, finally graduating in 1971. The difference between 1964 and 1968 was startling. There were still traditional dressers around but the hippies had arrived. More importantly, though, there was a new student union building (the Lair). Not much else had changed.

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  28. Sad to see it go. In the spring of 1993 I lost about 99% of my wardrobe due to a house fire. We had scheduled a spring break trip visit New England colleges a couple of weeks after the fire and while in Boston, I went to the Cambridge Store, met Denis Black, whose business card with a swatch attached I still have, and because J. Press then stocked my size, 42XL, I was able to replenish a good bit of my wardrobe. Over the years I bought a number of suits and sport coats from Denis by phone. Denis was the consummate professional and always a pleasure to deal with. Alas, no one, save O'Connell's which stocks a few items in my size, carry XLs any longer. I agree with the Anonymous at 3:51 that the Cambridge store was indeed a Mecca.

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  29. Where I live, Hawaii, you can literally no longer buy a real suit any longer. The last tailor, originally from India, passed away a couple of years ago and his employees finally shut down his shop last year. They do have a "Men's Wearhouse" in Honolulu, but it pains me just walking in there and seeing what they purport to sell as men's suits. There used to be an Indian tailor from Hong Kong who made regular trips through Honolulu to measure men for suits he would make and mail from Hong Kong, but that also has ceased.

    A sad state of affairs. (I could get into a similar story about trying to find a real watchmaker in Honolulu to maintain or repair mechanical watches.)

    My plan right now is to make arrangements with a good tailor shop in Seoul to take my measurements while I'm there, and then get my suits made that way from now on. Most men in Seoul still wear suits to work every day, so there is a demand for good tailors, and prices for quality clothing in Korea are much lower than in America. And in Korea there is a culture where tailors still take pride in their work and turn out world-class suits. The main obstacle is that Korean men tend to be slimmer than Westerners, especially in the leg area and the chest, so it isn't easy for Westerners to buy clothing off the rack that fits, so you really have to get your suits custom made from scratch.

    And you may ask, why does anyone wear suits in Hawaii? Some of us still have to go to court and do hearings.

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    1. funny the affects of Island Time, mahalo nui loa...
      the longer I stayed the less I wore.

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  30. Watching the decline of J. Press has been said, but I guess it's inevitable. And now Sam is closing the Nobby Shop too!

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  32. I recently ordered a gray pinstripe suit from J. Press online rather than going into New York (I live in Pennsylvania). I had a local tailor do the necessary alterations. He's also a master tailor for Brooks Brothers and his work is excellent.

    Business suits are part of my everyday life, even as most American businessmen are going casual. As Mr. Beresford said, above, some of us still have to go to court.

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  33. Here we go. "Southern Ivy". This is, without question, either the single most oxymoronic phrase ever transcribed or uttered in the hushed hallways of Charleston's finest town homes, or instead is the saddest thing ever said or written. In the former case, to speak and believe an oxymoron is to display profound, incurable ignorance of the utter absurdity of the phrase. This describes the average, slightly to significantly over-weight young scion of an old Southern Family recently graduated from Hampden-Sydney or Washington and Lee, wearing his brightest bow tie from Ben Silver, markedly pink linen pants, a blazer and a white, all cotton, button down shirt to the Gold Cup in Middleburg in late May (90 degrees), and chatting up his fraternity brother's girlfriend's best friend recently graduated from Elon (that is a college somewhere down there, I think) about having shot ducks somewhere in South Carolina. Place this gentlemen (his word, not mine) in the hallways of Columbia or Brown for about 3 minutes and see what happens. Prep Lives do not Matter there. To assert that Emory, or Davidson or any of the better Southern Schools (a low bar, I know) are the equivalent of Yale is beyond absurd. Just because they dress the way Yale men dressed 70 years ago does not make them Ivy League students, nor Prep for that matter since you can't be Prep and live anywhere south of Greenwich, or west of Williamstown. As to the sad part of this remark, this nice young Southern boy actually believes that he received an Ivy League education. That is the sad part, to pay $59,000 a year at W&L and receive an education the equivalent of a state school in Wisconsin.

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    1. The most important thing you get from a university is the chance to associate with the other students. The education you might receive is merely incidental. The requirements for attending any particular school vary but a car is really handy. Any car will do.

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    2. Wowsers. That seems..ungracious.

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    3. I take it you were rejected at Duke?

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    4. Duke? Nah, I went to Yale. You? Anyway, isn't Duke where they bring in basketball players for one year and then watch them leave for the pros? Yeah, Harvard and Dartmouth do that kind of thing all the time. I see our "Southern Ivy" boy went to Vandy. Wow, isn't that college in the Southeastern Conference, or whatever the call the group of world-class, Ivy-stopping colleges including Alabama, U Miss and Georgia?

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    5. It sounds to me like you must have been one of those legacy admits to Yale. You obviously learned nothing regarding humility or gratitude during your New Haven days.

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    6. If he was even that. Nothing here but a crude explosion of the sort of rudeness that probably would be out of place even at any "equivalent of a state school in Wisconsin."

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  34. "Anyway, isn't Duke where they bring in basketball players for one year and then watch them leave for the pros?"

    Congratulations, you are the winner of the Non Sequitur of the Week.

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    1. Thank you, Sartre. Those comments are indeed a long way from the discussion at hand, which is the demise of J. Press Cambridge.

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    2. Dear Sartre, I am unable to accept your prize. You see, freedom is what you do with what's been done to you. Didn't you say that?

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    3. What has been "done" to you my friend?

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    4. Am I your friend? Or are you using a common (in the meaning of vulgar) familiarity with me in order to mock me? In all events, what has been done to me is nothing more and nothing less, I may assume, than what has been done to all creatures, great and small. The difference for me, however, may be, that I became aware that free will, mixed with an abundance of inherited sadness, requires that I do unto others as they have done to me. I realize this is far from fathomable for you, as is my trenchant use of our common language, but take care as your little life will go on nonetheless, mostly the same as yesterday and no better tomorrow.

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