Monday, August 20, 2018

Around Yale in Late August

Photos by Salt Water New England









































































































21 comments:

  1. What a pity I went there as an adolescent. I had little or no capacity to appreciate the beauty, the opportunity and the privilege. What a pity.

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    1. I agree. I attended a college with a beautiful old campus in England in the '70s and, while I appreciated it, I find that today I look back and appreciate the opportunity and privilege much more. I sort of took it for granted back then. Thanks for the lovely photos of a beautiful American campus (that looks British). :-)

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  2. Can you imagine what it would cost to build anything even close to the group of buildings that make up Yale?
    So beautiful !

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  3. Without question, a strikingly beautiful campus, but one that Bertrand Russell was no big fan of.

    In fact, Lord Russell found all of the Neo-Gothic/Gothic Revival architecture so prevalent in the Ivy League to be quite presumptuous, and once remarked that he thought the American campuses looked as if “apes” were trying to emulate Oxford and Cambridge.

    So much for tact.

    Obviously, the great mathematician/philosopher was a total Old World snob, and one wonders what the author of the Principia Mathematica would think of all the narrow-mindedness and intolerance being taught inside those fake Gothic walls today?

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    1. Thankfully, ol' Bertie wasn't an architect. Also, he was a Brit. No standing on the topic. None.

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    2. Without the Brits, New England especially, would not have its culture. The clue is in the name and the names of the towns.

      It is surprising to see such nationalistic nativism, or even narrow anglophobia, on this pro-British website. It's time to get those chips off your shoulders!

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    3. You may have forgotten, but we had a revolution to break away from England. Sometime in the 1700s, I think. The earliest of settlers came to escape the religious strictures of the church-state.

      The culture has changed greatly since then. Thankfully, we aren't still Puritans, right? And, it continues to change and will continue to change. Think about it this way: today, Puritans wouldn’t recognize the place.

      Cultural clues do reside in the names of towns and places throughout the northeast, but not when seen from a myopic view. Certainly, there are many towns named with English place names. There are many non-English names, as well. Dutch, Irish, French, Scottish, and Native American place names abound. These along with British and other cultures shaped America. American culture, including New England’s culture, isn’t British, my friend. American culture is all of the above. It always has been.

      Also, the person reacting to someone saying American colleges look as if apes had designed them is neither an expression of nationalistic nativism nor an expression of Anglophobia. You might look up these terms and get them straight.

      Aiken

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    4. Frankly, these days, under our current presidential administration, it seems tempting to return to British provincial rule.

      For instance, taking effective action to correct our 18th century's "taxation without representation" protest (without an outright war, of course) now seems preferable to passively tolerating our nation's current IDIOCRACY -- have you seen the 2006 movie by the same name? It was uncannily prescient.

      It must be said that Bertrand Russell's "apes" remark was a hugely regrettable mistake. True architectural dignity and beauty speaks for itself, lasts for a very, very long time, and rises above the fleeting, ephemeral opinions of any self-styled critics.

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  4. So beautiful but what of the death and drugs nearby recently :o just awful!

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    1. Alas, there is more to New Haven besides old Eli and great apizza.

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    2. It makes you realize all of the big picture- the good and the bad. Beauty and ugly.
      What is to be appreciated and the why.

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  5. The pinnacle of higher education. Susan

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  6. Working your viewpoint the depth and perspective are fantastic in some of these shots.
    There is huge amount to savor and what it tells. So much detail in the design, architecture, common grounds, crests, down to the tiny representations in the frescos and artwork, the replacement wood next to the door knockers and themselves. Each picture certainly told a story if you are willing to look. Thank you for sharing all of this.
    Thank you for your work I appreciate it, not many understand the amount time/work involved- prepping/packing/traveling/shooting/processing for posting. Even if you are “going that way” there is still the before, during and after involved.
    I had forgotten how the grounds abound with true beauty. What a remarkable and wonderful place, I got lost in the pictures and what they told.
    Thank you again, what a difference you made in the day, I am still at awe...

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  7. Plus, a bird nest and a dog!

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  8. Well said! I was a newspaper journalist and the "before, during and after" is most of the process. Thanks, Muffy!

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  9. My last one starting this Fall - September always has that magic eternally youthful feeling. There is a reason why they call it the ivory tower.

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    1. My youngest boy is a Freshman at Yale this fall (move in day is Friday). Very excited! He actually got to choose between Yale and Brown and I am VERY HAPPY he chose Yale! Brown is a great school too but Yale is so pretty!

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  10. Fantastic post -- very informative comments. Kudos to the author for the labor of work involved in this historical presentation -- Anne

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  11. There is majesty in knowledge, intellectualism and curiosity. It is fitting that the architecture is magisterial as well. May all who pass through take full advantage of the opportunities that await.

    The Concord Diaspora

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  12. Still coming here days later to look/enjoy.
    Thank you!

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