Thursday, August 23, 2018

An Aran Sweater

Photos by Salt Water New England
  • An Aran Jumper/ Sweater... Hand-knit by the Ladies of Ireland's County Donegal
  • Irish Blackthorn Walking Stick... Hand Made by Seventh Generation Stick Maker in Ireland
  • Boots ... Provided by Dubarry of Ireland

22 comments:

  1. As they might have said where I grew up, you're pushing the season. It's still August down here.

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    1. Thankfully it IS her blog. And refreshing it is.

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    2. To be fair, the expression "pushing the season" was usually applied to the wearing of shorts rather early in the spring. At the moment, we're enjoying what the local paper is calling "blissful weather." But it said we'll have one more day of it "before summer says hello again."

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  2. BlueTrain,

    Every year there comes a day in August when the weather shows the first signs of fall. The humidity of the late summer air dries out and the temps drop for the first time since spring. I always feel the quickness of fall stirring deep inside, even though we are still out playing tennis or lazily enjoying the beaches and water. That happened up here in southern New England the other day. I started leaning towards fall, longing for October. That might have had something to do with this post.

    Aiken

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    1. I spent the summer after finishing high school in 1964 working on a tobacco farm near Amherst, Massachusetts. I don't recall any cool days in August but on the other hand, I also don't recall any hot and humid days like we have around here in Northern Virginia.

      Got to visit Emily Dickinson's house while I was there, with a private tour with the little old lady who lived there. It was one of those places from National Geographic that was on my to-see list. I'd still like to see Cozumel but I don't know about the Door Peninsula.

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    2. I grew up in Connecticut near Long Island Sound and now live near Hartford. Amherst isn't far and essentially has the same weather as northern Conn. It's more humid inland, but generally we get a week or two of "airconditioning weather." The rest of the time, it's fairly moderate.

      I once had a girlfriend who lived in Richmond. I'd visit her frequently. I couldn't believe the humidity there! I think they called it "dirty hot," which sounded to me like a euphemism. I'd take a shower and within minutes be sweaty again. So, no we don't get kind of hot & humid. Frankly, I think I'd be suicidal if we did.

      Aiken

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    3. Perfect, thank you!

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  3. On August 14th, one of our local TV weatherpersons said that right here on Peachtree Street the average daily temperature began its slow movement downward. I couldn't tell any difference in my comfort level until today. Just took the Brittany outside and with a temperature in the 60s and a moderated humidity, it felt great. Of course I had on a knit shirt and shorts and no, I didn't think of my Irish Fisherman's knit sweater but as I get older I think less of getting outside in temperatures cold enough to wear it but the walking stick, now that's a year rounder. Thanks for the pics, I like the look.

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  4. A superb combination!

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  5. My go-to uniform in the fall, minus the walking stick. I live in my Aran sweaters.

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  6. My brother did his final research for his Princeton thesis on James Joyce at Trinity in Dublin, summer of 1972. He brought me an Aran sweater which I still wear - a beautiful piece, obviously made for a lifetime!

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  7. I have had two over the years. Both purchased in Ireland and both hand knitted. They sat in my closet, unworn and unloved until I finally donated them to the local charity shop. I adore the look but the wool is just too scratchy, even with a camisole or shirt underneath. I so wish they made the same hand knitted sweater in 100% cotton.

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  8. It's very hard to find genuine Aran sweaters in Britain. Christmas markets in large towns and cities used to be an option.

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  9. Hey Everyone!

    How do these Aran sweaters compare to a L.L.Bean Nordic sweater in weight and warmth?

    Thank you in advance!

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    1. How did your research/comparison go?

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    2. What a beautiful garment!
      Thank you for reminding me to get to the cleaners.

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    3. I would say in most cases they are lighter. The stitches are a lot tighter on the Bean. The Bean sweaters are seriously warm. I have never owned an Aran sweater because of my size, the Irish me seem to be a bit smaller then me.

      David J Cooper

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    4. Thank you so much for your response David!

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  10. My aunt gave me an aran sweater after a trip to Ireland in the late 1950s. After years of wear I gave it to my grandson a few years ago.

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  11. Funny, I've been wearing (and knitting) Irish sweaters my entire life and have only ever seen them referred to as Aran here.

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  12. In my student days in Ireland I once hitched a lift with a man who was picking up hand-made Aran jumpers from knitters in mountain cottages. It took the better part of the day to get from a village on the west coast to Donegal town but worth every mile.

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  13. I had one about twenty years ago and while it had a bit of an itch factor, I defeated it by wearing either a cashmere turtleneck or a cotton skivvy underneath.

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