Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Wonder Bread, 1962

Photos by Salt Water New England
















51 comments:

  1. Store clerks, smiling, no face tattoos or piercings, did you Photoshop these pictures?

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    1. Right, and they weren't responding with "no problem" or "no worries."

      Jacqueline

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  2. Does anyone still eat Wonder Bread?
    Maybe the better question: Will anyone admit to it?

    Aiken

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    1. Absolutely! Not regularly, but there is nothing better for a grilled cheese or tuna or baloney and cheese...brings me right back to childhood.

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    2. LOL, Patsy. I don't eat any of that stuff!

      I never liked WB as a kid. I always thought it was rather flavorless.

      I make bread, usually once a week. I found a method that was developed by Chas. Van Over and written in his book, Best Bread Ever. It uses the Cuisinart to knead, so it's really easy to make. And, I must say, barring modesty for the moment (ha!), it's better than WB.

      Aiken

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    3. I don't eat it, but I really like Pepperidge Farm's Farmhouse white for grilled cheese sandwiches.

      Jacqueline

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  3. Nothing like Wonder Bread for my peanut butter and banana sandwiches and my pimento cheese. My wife prefers it for her tomato and mayo sandwiches. Long live soft white bread or as I grew up calling it: Loaf Bread.

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    1. Oh, I love all of those! Lunch at your house!

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    2. Not to mention fluffernutters!

      MaryAnne

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    3. Pimento cheese on white bread? Many a summertime lunch that was as a kid!

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  4. Wonder Bread is pure nostalgia. Author and artist Susan Branch (on Martha's Vineyard) in THE SUMMER BOOK (Little, Brown & Company, 1995) devoted a whole hand-lettered watercolor page (p. 45) to "Bologna Sandwiches & Potato Chips." Soft white bread is a must. At the top of this page is a quotation from Julia Child: "The nutritionists are ruining our food."

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  5. I would much rather have a Hostess Cupcake or a Table Talk Pie to Wonder Bread.

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    1. I am from outside Worcester, MA, where TT still thrives; but having been transplanted to the greater Philadelphia area I am now forced to resort to Tasty Cake. The sacrifices we make.

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  6. I grew up one block from the wonder bread bakery in New Haven and the smell of the fresh baked was incredible. We also enjoyed buying products at their bakery store at greatly reduced prices. I really miss those days

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  7. I was a Merita bread kid, sponsors of "The Lone Ranger" in the '50s. Looked down on Wonder Bread people, can't now recall exactly why. Don't think I ever had any rye, whole wheat, etc. until I went to college. We didn't call it white bread, loaf bread, sliced bread, just "bread".

    NCJack

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    1. It wasn't Wonder Bread (maybe Betsy Ross) at our house but we called it "light bread," which was a pretty accurate description.

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  8. As a kid I used to like to squish it up into a ball and eat it that way

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  9. Ah America...feeding you garbage since 19XX. Admittedly, I have partaken of much of it! I remember that Wonder Bread packaging too. Looks like these might have been taken around Easter time, are those chocolate bunnies in the background of the first pic? Does make you long for those days...they seemed simpler and more wholesome...the Wonder Bread days! These are great photos! ARH

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    1. Regarding longing for those good ole WB days, the operative word in your comment is "seemed".

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  10. Fabulous. I miss the days when life was lived in black and white (or even grainy color). I was immortal then.

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  11. What an interesting theme for a posting!
    These shops, with friendly real people behind the counters, are what I miss most. In these shops you could also buy as much meat as you wanted which was weighed and wrapped in white butcher paper--not prepackaged in plastic paid for at self-checkouts in impersonal "super"markets...sigh. I do miss that personal touch.
    Thanks for the memories.

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    1. I miss that too--the butcher shop and the bakery.

      Jacqueline

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  12. "Helps build strong bodies 12 ways." There, I just dated myself. More to the point, though: why was someone taking so many photos of Wonder Bread?

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  13. The best comment yet: Thanks for the memories.
    Posts and comments really bring back times past and even questions like: Did you ever know anybody who ate Roman Meal Bread?

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    1. Roman Meal Bread was what we had in our house for sandwiches. I remember it as sort of beige with a few token flakes of wheat substance. I don't think it was much different from basic white bread except for those flakes.

      Jacqueline

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  14. This was not permitted in our house. My mother had some ridiculous idea that it was low class, tasteless and caused colorectal cancer.

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    1. There are many, many wise people who agree with your mother!

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  15. I grew up in central Massachusetts. One of the most memorable school field trips was the one to the Wonder ("Wonda") Bread factory in Framingham. It smelled amazing. The only time I ever ate a Twinkie was there...and it was warm.

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  16. Fifty years ago or so someone asked one of the cooks at the Miss Worcester Diner what kind of pie they had. He replied "Table Talk".

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  17. Capt Kangaroo always used to say "Tell Mother to look for the red, yellow and blue balloons at your favorite grocery store" !

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  18. I remember reading that the best use for storebought white bread was for dusting.

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  19. Ah, the good old days! Guess what? They really were. Never worry about dating yourself. We earned thise memories! Gotta be careful though, some folks will deny they ate it. Why? My Italian grandparents loved their Italian bread, but they were not above serving up a nice (as they called it) American sandwich on Wonder Bread. Come on PB&J had to be on this stuff!!! And if you think about the 12 ways ( probably vitamins) werent they probably the same vitamins you can buy today in a nature food store? Just wondering about Wonder Bread.

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    1. That's funny about the vitamins. Touting the "enriched" part of bread and cereal was a big deal back then--maybe like calcium and fiber today showing up in various foods and beverages.

      Jacqueline

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  20. Trashy as it may be, Wonder Bread is great for Fluffer Nutter sandwiches and a crispy butter laden grilled cheese!

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  21. Ours was a Silvercup household. My recollection is that as a child I preferred Silvercup to Wonder Bread. Perhaps it had something to do with the wax paper wrapper. My mother used the wrapper for something, but I can't recall what. Perhaps to wrap my father's sandwiches. Then there was the Hellman's vs. Miracle Whip debate, of course dolloped on a square of lime Jello on top of a leaf of iceburg. Grandma used Hellman's. We used Miracle Whip. WASP heaven. And who can forget tut tut nothing but Butternut bread. Oh, Pancho!

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    1. Oh that Jello and Miracle Whip bit. My grandmother made a "salad" with grated carrots and pineapple in lemon Jello, and...yes...on top of shredded iceberg lettuce with a dollop of Miracle Whip on top of the Jello part. I wasn't fond of that one, but it sure showed up frequently.

      Jacqueline

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  22. A couple times a summer, for tomato and mayo sandwiches!!

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  23. Out in California, our version of Wonder Bread was Weber's. It came in two versions--white and brown. The white was packaged in a blue and white checked gingham bag, and the brown was packaged just like it but red. The brown bread was exactly like the white but with the addition of some coloring. It was heavily marketed to kids with Woody Woodpecker as the "spokesbird" in their commercials during the cartoon hours on Saturday mornings.

    Jacqueline

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  24. I would love to know where each of these photos was taken. Several of them remind me of the litte general store where I grew up in Brookfield Center, CT. The structure still stands, but today it houses a real estate agent.

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  25. I fondly recall the occasional trip to a Bickfords in Natick, MA for a Sunday treat that involved my family driving past the Framingham Wonder Bread factory. I gazed in open mouthed awe at the overwhelming thought of all those cupcakes, Twinkies and bread just on the other side of those walls. And the smell was heavenly. Hmmm.

    Imagine my delight when my school went on our field trip to the factory, as someone else mentioned above. Bliss.

    To echo some other comments, the field trip, the table talk pies, and the mayo and tomato sandwiches are all wonderful memories of my childhood. As someone else mentioned I honestly don't recall there being any other bread than just regular white bread. I didn't know bagels, rye bread, wheat bread, etc. even existed until I got to college. Very different from today and my children's experience. What marvelous memories. Ahh, wonderful warm Wonder Bread. 'Builds strong bodies 12 strong ways.' Think I know what to have for lunch!

    The Concord Diaspora.

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  26. You must be from Southern CA. Have never heard of Weber's but then I am from Northern CA and it was always Wonder Bread at our house. Many years since my last encounter with WB but do have wonderful childhood memories as so many others. PA

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    1. Yes, I grew up in Southern California. We also had Van DeVamp's bakery products that were sold in stores like Von's and Safeway. We thought their cupcakes were the best--packaged six to a box. There were Van DeKamp's restaurants shaped like giant windmills, and the waitresses wore crisp blue dresses with white aprons and those Dutch hats. The Helm's bakery was in Culver City, and it was huge. They had trucks that went around and delivered in neighborhoods once or twice a week.

      Jacqueline

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  27. My father had been a P.O.W. for a year in Germany during the war and often spoke of the bread they were given. Presumably rye bread, he said "it had strength." Yet we never had anything remotely similar at home when I was growing up. Not even whole wheat bread. But that was a time and place when making biscuits and cornbread was usual. It's possible the A&P, the only supermarket in town, carried nothing but plain white bread.

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  28. Blue Train! What a story you slipped into that brief comment. I'm glad your father made it out and it feels a bit disrespectful of his experience for me to note that German bread is astonishing. But it just simply is.

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    1. Oh, no, he thought very highly of German bread. A wide variety of German bread is available here, the best coming from a place called The Swiss Bakery (They do wedding cakes, too, and have lots of chocolates). Anyway, as he told the story, his experience wasn't too bad, considering. I was stationed in Augsburg when I was in the army, which was about 35 miles from where he was held prisoner.

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    2. Yes, to the Swiss Bakery; so glad to find a decent bakery. We moved to the Town of Clifton about a year ago after my husband and I spent 19 years in DC.

      SassyinClifton

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  29. Loaf bread? There's a Southern voice for you! Do you use Duke's Mayonnaise on your tomato sandwiches?

    But I digress. I buy two loaves of Pepperidge Farm sandwich bread every year, one in November, one in December. I cannot imagine turkey sandwiches without it! I have converted to New England turkey sandwiches with mayonnaise, stuffing, and cranberry sauce, and "better" breads just don't hold together.

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    1. Actually, my folks used Sauer's and my wife's family used Blue Plate but now... It's Hellmans. Had a coupon and bought some Duke's awhile back but, well, back to Hellman's with olive oil.

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  30. 4th photo down from the top. Not only could you buy WB from this gent, there is also an ashtray next to the loaves so you could continue smoking while he rang up your purchase.

    I member in the mid 70s I hated going to the local bank to deposit my pay cheque because everyone who worked there smoked. Even the tellers were smoking as they completed my transaction.

    Hardly the good old days.

    David Cooper

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  31. Want to know what machine-refined, denatured white flour and sugar did to world populations? Weston A. Price's timeless monograph, "Nutrition and Physical Degeneraton" is an eye-opener. Just make sure to wash that Wonder Bread down with grass-fed butter, calves liver and a whole lot of lobster meat, OK? ;-)

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