Saturday, July 7, 2018

Haying
















37 comments:

  1. Well, I hope the ladies enjoy this post ;)

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    1. Oh, we do, we do!
      Thank you for these great posts!
      My grandfather had an ancient tractor but I never got to see it in action.

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  2. Good heavens...that was a lovely treat. Better than strong coffee. Thank you.

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    1. I'll see your coffee; raise you 2 shots espresso with fresh cream & titch of Pendleton 1910.

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  3. Well, I have a farm and I've never seen a real farmer dress this way. I do know that is a side delivery rake....our late tenant farmer used to mow the front yard with it! I will text this to my farmer (4 hours away) who is in agribusiness and has the latest John Deere equipment and get his opinion!

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    1. "A real farmer?" He's a real farmer.

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    2. A side delivery rake, rakes hay in windrows. This is a sickle mower and a square baler. I am a real farmer.

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    3. Maybe, but this post isn't about you, so your observations and speculations about this farmer's attire, or his tools, couldn't be less interesting or relevant.

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    4. You really should get out more.

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  4. The farmer kinda reminded me of my granddad except that he wore overalls and brogans but always with a white shirt and his old Sunday- go-to-meeting hat. He was a ruggedly handsome man who still had an old Fordson tractor in my childhood days. My granddad had a pocket watch but never carried it when he was working - his time apparatus was the sun and more likely it was when the job was done.

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  5. OK, I keep seeing this really gorgeous guy in your posts. Is he your husband? If so, lucky you! If not, please send him down to Atlanta. :-)

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    1. He's a neighbour.

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    2. ohhhhhhh...... more details please!!

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    3. Yes give us the juicy juicy details!!! pleeease!!

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  6. I remember helping cut, bale, and haul hay in the summer, and feed hay in the winter. Ours were square bales, as shown here. It was hot work in the summer and cold work in the winter. The choice task in both seasons was driving the truck. Now it seems I see only the round bales. I guess they can be moved around more easily by a single person.

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  7. Best post ever!

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  8. Gives a whole new meaning to "love thy neighbor." I'd have to borrow a few cups of sugar and then return with a coffee cake or two.

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  9. Forget the fireman calendar. Let's have a sexy farmer calendar. Oh! Oh! We already have one. Love the tractor.

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  10. Of course this guy uses Farmall tractors! One day he'll sell them to someone deserving. I'll bet he bought them from someone who did the same. It brought back many memories to watch your clips and my thanks go out to you both.

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  11. Haying & working on equipment without shoes/boots? Hay stubble can create a nasty puncture wound, and with the exception of Amish children, nobody farms it barefoot...
    Okay, I'm being grumpy...
    I long ago learned (having realized that farming was not in my future) how exhaustingly difficult haying can be with mowers, rakes & balers much like these. My hat's off to the gentleman farmer in these photos, though. He sure is cool.

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  12. While I wished more farmers looked like that, I am baffled by the attire. I know many farmers and none would ever work the fields or operate equipment in a loose fitting shirt and bare feet, too big of a safety risk.

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  13. Baffled? The guy is cool !

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  14. SIGH! Enough is enough. Time to comment on other posts

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  15. I wonder if your neighbor/farmer ever reads these posts . I hope that if he does, he gets a good chuckle from them.

    MaryAnne

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  16. You're excused for not having a canine in this lovely collection of photos!

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    1. Dog, why yes-I thought, wait...that was me panting.

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  18. These comments are cracking me up! He has a very handsome face, but apart from that, I don't see anything unusual about this. My dad always wears old khakis and white shirts for working outside (building, bush-hogging, clearing land, etc.). Not special ones bought for that purpose--just the ones that are too worn-out for regular wear. In cooler weather, he throws on an ancient sports coat for cutting firewood.

    This guy isn't doing everything barefoot; he's wearing crocks while on the tractor. May not be standard attire, but, based on what I've seen here in Alabama, I can't imagine that it's all that rare.

    Lovely photographs--a feeling of quiet security and peaceful routine. A dog really would complete the scene, though.

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  19. Okay, so the guy is eye candy. Here's my question: Is there a farmer's daughter?

    Aiken

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  20. And no one commented on that magnificent old Farmall?

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    1. Picturesque, but I'm surprised it has the horsepower to run that baler. Guess because the baler is just dropping the bales and has no kicker and wagon, it can just handle it. That's also why he's running a sidebar mower and not a mower conditioner like most people do these days.

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    2. My grandfather's was an ancient Farmall, old even in my childhood. The old gentleman who helped around the place called it 'Baby', and referred to it with the feminine pronoun. The baler also just dropped the bales, and a truck would come around later with 2 people in the back. One would throw the bales up and the other stack them in the truck bed. That process was reversed at the barn, with one person throwing the bales off, and the other stacking them in the barn. The first and only time I saw a baler throwing bales directly into a wagon was in France, where they were baling straw after the wheat harvest. I was amazed.

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  21. Ahhh- the "disapproval police" newbies are tattling on themselves- The lovely Lady of Thee Blog has shown grand pictures she takes/posts for years now of this farmer and what he always wears per season, what he does, etc...without really any change haute couture wise. It still always a treat to see, each time.

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  22. After reading these comments I know I must be getting old, the Farmall is the first thing I noticed!

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  23. Are we that far removed from being in touch with nature and the land that a gentleman farmer can seem so unique or even strange?

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  24. Well. My husband never looked like that when he was haying.
    Wonderful shots.

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