Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Drying Linen Shirts

European Linen from Sailor Rose - Photos by Salt Water New England
The difference in wrinkles between five minutes in the dryer (above) compared to no time in the dryer (below)...



Line Dried after No Time in the Dryer (Left) compared to Five Minutes in the Dryer (Right)

18 comments:

  1. Thank you for this. The difference is well worth the five minutes.

    slf

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  2. Is there
    no problem with shrinkage?
    Please advise.
    Thank you !

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  3. If you're still going to iron it, I doubt that it makes any difference. However, I line dry many things, not because I'm afraid the fabric will shrink but rather because the seams seem to pucker. Some all-cotton garments are also apparently sews with thread that is not cotton and will not stand high heat from the iron.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you. We fortunately have plenty of linen. So we’re not in a hurry to dry our shirts etc.. Will continue to line dry our garments.

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  4. Old Trick: wash, line dry...
    then into clothes dryer on "Air Fluff" for several minutes(no heat just the tumbling washing of air over it, lint collects in lint trap- I call this Air Wash and use it to freshen up my Pendleton blankets once in a while.
    Works great for line dry levis.

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  5. I use the 5 minute-in-the-dryer technique on my chambray work shirts and it works beautifully and it gives me the option to iron or not, time and mood allowing. Summertime, I usually take it easy...

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  6. There are many problems in the world, and undoubtedly the correct method of drying one's linen shirt is first and foremost among them. More vexing than the death of thousands of children a month around the world from hunger. Far more a threat to our humanity than the absence of clean water supply to 500,000,000 people in Asia and Africa. Of significantly greater importance than Ebola, malaria, cholera and other diseases. The question is not how horrible wrinkled linen shirts are, the question is how can mankind come together an overcome this threat.

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    1. I believe I speak for many when I say we are sadly aware of the state of our world. SWNE is a welcome respite.

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    2. Dearest Ferd;
      good luck!
      https://www.unicef.org/about/employ/index_careers.html

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    3. Anon 6:13: A-friggin'-men.

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    4. So what you are saying is that we got 99 problems, but this ain't one?

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  7. The solution is obviously to whinge about it on a lifestyle blog's post about clothes.

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  8. I give my linen shirts and pants a good shake out when removing from the washer. Line dry them. Then iron. I enjoy the process.

    Earth changing or famine solving? Nope. I do what I am able in those areas on other areas of my life. This site is for me. For my lifestyle. And for my pleasure.

    I am not about to wear a hairshirt because I am singularly unable to solve the troubles of the world.

    My .02 cents. Peace to all.

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  9. Linen, I've found, is a great fabric for travel. It’s durable. It dries quickly. It’s comfortable in hot weather. It irons up nicely. And there’s always an iron to be found in hotels in steamy East Africa. (There, are found some of the countries where people live who have the least access to potable water, 60,000,000 in Ethiopia alone). Those are some of the reasons I wear linen when I’m in the field visiting rural water projects.

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  10. With our linen items, I do 5 minutes in the dryer, gently pull into shape while hanging on a hanger. When dry - and this sounds crazy - I iron our items using a heavy starch. This keeps the linen nicely in shape while still allowing it to wrinkle. --Holly in PA

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  11. If I have time, I throw them in the dryer with a slightly damp towel for a few minutes.

    If I don't, oh well. It's linen; it's supposed to wrinkle.

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  12. I probably shouldn't admit to how much ironing I do. I like to iron cotton and linen items while still damp. Cheaper than therapy, I guess 😁

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