Monday, May 14, 2018

Out and About

Photos by Salt Water New England








































































21 comments:

  1. Anything other than a golden retriever in the ice cream truck just feels wrong.

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  2. Perfection!

    MaryAnne

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  3. My first day as a Good Humor Man dressed in my very white uniform with my Route Supervisor riding with me and I got my first warning about dogs. A Boxer approached and my supervisor told me to never let a Boxer get close and I said, "They bite? and he laughed and told me that those loveable dogs seem to live to slobber all over those white pant legs. He was right and I found they were loveable but at a distance. Thank you so much for the pictures - very enjoyable.

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  4. i love these Muffy. i always do. thank you!

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  5. Yup, my favorite posts, too. And I'm loving that red house...looks like a salt box with an addition. Wonderful pics....thank you.

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  6. Lovely - but the deer make me nervous. I see a deer these days and just think ticks and lyme disease. The great New England outdoors doesn't seem so welcoming lately.

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  7. Well that brightened my day. Thank you!!

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  8. Early childhood memories include quince and lilac shrubs. As a mother of young children back in the 70's I planted quince bushes outside my children's bedroom windows so they could have that view each Spring morning first thing. Hope they one day recall that as fondly as I do now of my own childhood recollections. PA

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  9. Love love. Agree with others. Out and About are my favorite posts. Thanks Muffy! N from VA

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  10. So pretty! Enjoyed the beautiful spring weather at my daughter's graduation from UMass last Friday. It was a perfect New England day!

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  11. Is that turf grown on a matting base material ?

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    Replies
    1. Hi N Pet. I'm assuming that sod is grown much the same way on the East coast as on the West, where it is grown through a thin mesh that looks similar to what is sold as bird or deer netting. When harvested, a sod cutter cuts just deeply enough to get most of the roots and the mesh holds it all intact.

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    2. Thanks for that B Block :-)

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    3. Thanks for the question and the explanation. I've always wondered what holds the sod together. It's amazing the things one learns on this blog!

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  12. Dibs on the yellow house.

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  13. Advice from a TV Gardner: Don't ask your sod installer what day the sod was cut but ask what time today it was cut. Sounds like overkill to me but what do I know, I'm a seeder, reseeder, and overseeder. I just heard a recording of Gene Autry singing "Old Faithful" and I thought he must have been thinking of our lawn when he mentions fields white with clover.

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