Sunday, April 22, 2018

White Napkins

Photos by Salt Water New England
White napkins, often linen or cotton damask, serve a variety of utilitarian roles.  Large and small (dinner and luncheon size respectively), un-ironed, easy to access quickly, and abundant enough to be used without thought, they are inexpensive to acquire over time.

Seldom Matching



15 comments:

  1. I agree. I am partial to linen. Once in a while I bleach them in the sun to take care of any stubborn stains.

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  2. In our house, we never use paper napkins, only cloth. You are right that linen and damask napkins are easily acquired. It seems that no one else wants them anymore. I even have some really lovely linen cocktails napkins acquired at estate sales. Cloth napkins are more practical - they don't slide off your lap and are sturdier than paper. Not to mention they just look nicer on the table.

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  3. We use them every day. I love the way they look and am glad we are doing something for the environment, too.

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  4. We never use paper napkins. Cotton and linen are more practical; I’m surprised at the number of people who think they are too ‘fancy’😆. cheers!

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    1. I had one guest ask me for a paper napkin and when I said I didn’t have any, she went into my kitchen to find a paper towel.

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  5. Cotton napkins here daily at the breakfast and dinner tables. If folded right out of the dryer, they do not wrinkle and look very nice folded or rolled in a pewter ring. People who complain about cloth napkins being 'too fancy' probably wipe their mouths on the arms. I've witnessed it more than once.

    Best Regards,

    Heinz-Ulrich von B.

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    1. They probably eat standing over the sink too.

      David Cooper

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    2. Now THAT gave me a chuckle. Thank you.

      H-U

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  6. Never occurred to me not to iron them. Well, I don't iron them for "just us" but I do iron them when guests come. However, from now on, I may not. Thanks! :-)

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  7. We don’t have any paper napkins in the house. Guests choose their “own” mis-matched and often colorful cloth napkin at their first meal. They use it until it needs replacing with another clean mis-matched cloth napkin. Voila.

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  8. We only use cloth napkins. For every day they are usually cotton and for occasions we use inherited linen napkins. Which ever type we are using, they are always ironed.

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  9. When I was working as a teacher, I would pack my lunch along with a cloth napkin. At first, this drew stares and remarks but soon others started to do the same! And, of course, at home we never use paper, always cotton or linen.

    slf

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  10. One of the first things I did as a young married was make cotton and linen napkins. White, blue and white small floral which I still have, green and white and we celebrate 50 years this Dec. Our children have carried on the habit. When they visit our oldest granddaughter hums and haws as to which napkins to use for that nights dinner. Wonderful! Do find that the fabrics today are nothing like the napkins I've had and used for years. The best reason for keeping the old. PA

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  11. For years I've used paper napkins for family and ironed cloth napkins for guests. Thanks to this blog, I'll use my wrinkled 100% cotton napkins everyday and forget paper napkins. Thank you.

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  12. We love our cloth napkins, too. For a long time ours were unironed except for holidays and other special meals. However, a few years ago I inherited a mangle. It makes short work of napkins, pillowcases, etc. I still hand press the monogrammed linens to puff out the monogram, like grandmother taught me.

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