Saturday, March 10, 2018

Another Nor'easter (aka Not Up March Hill Yet)

Photos by Salt Water New England
 Back-to-back Nor'easters resulted in predictable disruptions, including tree damage and multiple-day power losses.



Knocking Snow from Branches Blocking Drive So Snowplow Could Get Through - Hand-Knit Aran Sweater from Blarney (2 years old); Hand-Knit Wool Mittens from Congregational Church Sale (5 years old); Thick Blackthorn Walking Stick from McCaffrey Irish Store (7 years old); Hat from Vermont Originals (8 years old); Dress Campbell Flannel Shirt from Beans (28 years old) 


Snowfall


When on a Well...

















Crews from New Hampshire Arriving On Scene

Recon Truck in Drive - Hopeful Sign

Sequel Idea for Whales of August - Working Title: Bucket Trucks of March

Utility Crews from New Hampshire in the Drive - An Incredibly Wonderful Sight

22 comments:

  1. Wow! The morning after the night before, as my grandma would say! I hope the girls in the henhouse fared well.

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  2. You've been hit hard. Today, finally, we are seeing the end in sight for our winter here in North Idaho. It's the second time this winter we thought we were seeing the end in sight, and we're really hoping it's the last.

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  3. Seeing the photos of the damaged and fallen trees reminded me of the wonderful article in the current (March 2018) Smithsonian:

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-whispering-trees-

    Do Trees Talk to Each Other?
    A controversial German forester says yes, and his ideas are shaking up the scientific world

    EXCERPT:
    A revolution has been taking place in the scientific understanding of trees, and Wohlleben is the first writer to convey its amazements to a general audience. The latest scientific studies, conducted at well-respected universities in Germany and around the world, confirm what he has long suspected from close observation in this forest: Trees are far more alert, social, sophisticated—and even intelligent—than we thought.

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  4. Nadja, I listened to Hidden Life of Trees on a long road trip last fall and have book-marked chapters and listened again. That is amazing science and life-altering for me.

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  5. B Block I agree (the bent/stunted/misshapen tree is beautiful too). I am going to read the book.

    Below is a link to the NYT's 2016 story on Peter Wohlleben:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/30/world/europe/german-forest-ranger-finds-that-trees-have-social-networks-too.html

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  6. Somehow, even after big snowstorms, New England is really good at getting the roads cleared - unlike Michigan and Ohio where I grew up. My folks lived in Wilbraham years ago and they said they never had to be afraid driving in the winter. The day after a storm the Mass Pike as well as mountain roads were immediately cleared. I found the same thing traveling New England. Also, the roads seem to hold up better and don't disintegrate like they do in the Great Lakes region - Michigan roads being the absolute worst!!!

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  7. Whales of August, a favorite movie! When I was young girl my parents would some times make "snow ice cream" as a treat! Fresh fluffy snow, sugar and cream. That was way back when and long before acid rain. We lived in a mountain community in northern CA where air pollution was on no ones mind. The snow ice cream was a delight because one could always have store bought ices cream. PA

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  8. Winter scenes look very pretty, but the aftermath... . One of the reasons we cajoled our parents to come to California (grand kids as bait). We were always worried about them when storms came through, even though they would be out there talking to the neighbors; helping to excavate and chipper as a jaybirds in their 80s. We're kind of spoiled in CA - a little rain and everything goes crazy.

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  9. Snow can be so awesomely beautiful while at the same time, so awesomely dangerous. Glad things are getting brighter!

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  10. The last storm was violently windy and there was so much less damage. This was a still, silent, relentless, wet, heavy snow that weighted everything down. I got the snow off the lilac, the boxwood, the hemlock, and the dogwoods, but the taller stuff was on their own. "Widow Makers" in the yard, unsure state of the large dead trees, ice heave in the gutters, and a few days worth of the New York Times lost in the berms at the end of the driveway. California sounds very nice right now! Thankfully, we did not lose electricity and the mail box didn't get popped off by the snow plows. It has not been that bad a winter really, but I am certainly ready for warmer weather. I would not say this is the time to be pushing real estate in Connecticut!

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  11. I'm just curious what readers think of gas log fireplaces. They save lugging in wood during a power outage to keep the fireplace(s) going to prevent frozen pipes. However, there may be purists out there who think such conveniences are an anathema. After these past few storms, the ambient warmth of a gas log unit (and I have seen some realistic ones) that's easy to turn on when needed seems very nice. At least my back thinks so.

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    1. We have two gas fireplaces. One in family room and another upstairs in master bedroom. Especially nice when electric goes off!! We have instant heat when needed and here in PA we certainly have those occasions. Also, for anyone with allergies, be it dust or tree such as I have it is so much better. In the past we have had wood burning but this for us is a better alternative. And they look and are quite cozy and warm when burning. PA

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    2. We also have two gas fireplaces (propane, actually). My husband didn't want to be bothered with wood. We love our fireplaces; they're clean, realistic, and easy to use. A fireplace is vitally important to me in a cold climate, but I'm not a purist. I just want that flame. Plus, even though we have a generator, our Jotul stove will heat even without power...just the blower won't work. We're quite happy with these.

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    3. We have one in our kitchen and it has long been the gathering place. We love to sit by it during our long Idaho winters.

      MaryAnne

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  12. So sorry about your poor trees, but I do love seeing snow photos since we hardly ever get any here. Thank you! And the roads looked nice and clear. If it snows an inch here in Atlanta, the entire city is thrown into a panic. We just don't have experience with it, more's the pity.

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  13. We didn't do too badly here in Vermont, but it's not over yet. More coming tonight. We'll be ready. Have a generator, fireplace, popcorn, movies....all set to go! Let it snow!

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  14. We were without power( some people are still without) to 2 days here in Easton Ct.... We were hit pretty hard.

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  15. I was, until the past years, a huge fan of winter, although here in Italy don't snowing too much and there is not so cold as in New England, but this winter I totally looking forward for warm weather. The pictures as always are great!

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  16. Living in New England means March will break your heart every time.

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  17. I'd be too depressed if I thought like that. I remember what I learned in grammar school: "March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb."

    It's almost the ides of March -- time to start looking for that lamb.

    Aiken

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    1. Hi Aiken, I don't think it's depressing - just the way it is - and the lamb ain't showing up soon!

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  18. Winter brings a mix of emotions here in the south. We sometimes have an actual winter and get to enjoy the cold weather before the warm weather comes through. Looking forward to visiting New England soon

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