Sunday, January 21, 2018

Men In Bucks?

Photos by Salt Water New England
A Reader Question:
I have a question.  I used to see Bucks all of the time but now I am much less aware of them.  Do people still wear Bucks?  White or Dirty?   What brands?  And if not, what are alternatives?
Bought at Barrie's, York Street, New Haven

Also from Barrie's and J. Press

34 comments:

  1. Still wear them. O'Connells has white and dirt bucs.

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  2. In the South? You bet. My brother wears white bucks whenever he wears his seersucker suit in court.

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  3. I wear them, too. Darker shades...not white or cream. They look good with jeans and sweaters.

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  4. I teach at a New England boarding school and some of the students and I still wear them. Dirty bucks, too. Mine are from Brooks Brothers, bought a long time ago. A suede eraser and chalk bag keeps them going.

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  5. I wear dirty bucks, weather permitting. They're Sherman Bros. house brand.

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  6. I wear dark brown suede bucs with business casual. They look great! They're a little hard to find, and not always available from the major shoe manufactures (my preferred brand is Allen Edmonds, because I have wide feet), but they appear on the market every so often. As Michael says, they are more durable than you might think, those little rubber suede brushes work pretty well.

    If you are wearing khakis or wool slacks with a sport coat, suede chukka boots can also be an option, if the sole isn't too flashy. Suede chukkas are also a little easier to find than suede bucks. I probably wouldn't wear suede chukkas with a blue blazer, but they look really good with khakis and a sport coat.

    I've never actually seen white suede bucs in real life. At least I don't think i've seen them, maybe I did and just didn't notice them. It would be really fun to wear them with a seersucker suit though. They'd probably go well with khakis or linen trousers too.

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  7. Here in my small town deep in Sweet Tea land and almost 70 degrees I wore a dark green cotton/cashmere v-neck with a pink BB broadcloth button down, khakis and ivory & brown Rah Rahs or saddle oxfords to Church this morning. I wear dirty bucks 8-9 months of the year and my white bucks usually from mid-May to early September. The brands are Bass, Florsheim and Johnston & Murphy but the Bass dirty bucks are nearing replacement and I may to go to a different brand if for no reason than better laces. And yes, my seersuckers and linens are limited to the traditional months but shorts...they get worn anytime above 32 degrees.

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  8. During the summer months, yes. Bought from Barrie's when they were open and adjacent to J Press. You could go from one store to the other, and when I first went in it seemed like they were the same store. Anyway, the chalk bag has kept these comfortable shoes going strong for a few decades.

    Aiken

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  9. Absolutely. I wear both. I have two pair of white bucks; first pair are almost destroyed and the second pair are in training. I wore my dirty bucks yesterday as a matter of fact.

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  10. Yes, I still wear bucks; dark brown. Being from New England, I would not be caught dead in a white pair. Growing up, I rarely if ever saw anyone in MA, NH, or ME wearing them. My sense (and perception) is that they are more of a southern thing these days. And since white bucks can only really be worn with a seersucker suit, they don't appeal to my New England sensibilities (they're not very practical) My current pair are dark brown, and can be worn with khakis or jeans. They are from Sebago, and they have held up pretty well I must say.

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    1. Well, white bucks weren't ubiquitous across all strata of New England society. Perhaps you grew up in a segment of of it more accustomed to Hush Puppies and department store running shoes for leisure footwear.

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    2. Yes, Hush Puppies and department store sneakers for leisure were and are eminently more practical, and considerably less pretentious than white bucks.

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    3. It's always good to know where you fit best, but probably better not to ascribe it to "being from New England" or "your New England sensibilities." And if you think white bucks are "pretentious," or "can only be worn with a seersucker suit," they probably weren't really for you in the first place.

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    4. No, they aren't for me, because I'm not pretentious and prefer to be more understated. "Southern prep" is very different from "New England prep," and wearing white bucks with anything other than a seersucker suit just comes across as trying to hard.

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    5. The history of white bucks includes, but is not limited to, an Ivy League pedigree. The Ivy League is, by definition, a New England phenomenon. During 50s and 60s and 70s, New England prep schools were direct tributaries to the Ivy Leagues and the Seven Sisters. The shoes, along with the rest of their wardrobes, travelled with them and became part of what is known as "the Ivy League look" or "trad." While white bucks are indeed worn with seersucker (which is worn elsewhere than the South) they are also worn with khakis and with shorts. Again, it may be "trying too hard" for you, but please stop speaking as though your own personal sartorial preferences represent a "New England" insight. They don't. It's really that simple. Your obsession with "pretension" suggests that you spend way more time thinking about clothes than you're trying to pretend you don't.

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    6. Also, frankly, there's no such thing as "southern prep." "Prep" originated in the Northeast, and is in direct line of descent from British upper-class casual clothing. Southerners wearing "prep" or "Ivy" or "trad" are not "southern preps," they are Southerners wearing a nationalized adaptation of clothing that originated on the eastern seaboard. And wearing seersucker in the South—with or without white bucks—is about staying alive in the heat, not being "preppy."

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    7. My wife's grandparents both worked at a prep school in Virginia, if you include that in the South. No information on his shoes to relate, unfortunately.

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  11. Yes, here in the South from Memorial Day to Labor Day, worn with the seersucker suit.

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  12. Dirty bucks, yes; bought years ago from, where else - Barry's. Made in England and still going strong.

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  13. White bucks, shorts, no socks....North/South, shouldn't matter

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    1. Wearing bucks without socks is like wearing penny loafers without socks - you shouldn't do it; it just doesn't look right.

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    2. Crikey!! I must in deep trouble. I go penny loafer-sockless almost daily during warmer weather (not really a smart move in the snow, but I've done that, too).

      Bare-Ankles Aiken

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    3. Anon 11:12, you wear penny loafers with socks? Even with shorts? Good Lord, are you a German tourist, by any chance? Do you wear dark socks with sandals too? LOL

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  14. My experience with classic white bucks? Women love (or really like) men who wear them.

    And so I make it a point to trot around in them on appropriate summer occasions.

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  15. Dirty bucks, no socks, khaki’s, BBOCDB, Navy blazer.
    Coastal Virginia....

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  16. Alden makes really nice white bucks still

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  17. I threw mine out, and now wish I hadn't. Totally fine to wear white bucks in New England. Don't see it much any more, but totally fine. What you do see more often here is men wearing a seersucker jacket with tan pants. Seersucker jackets are always worn with seersucker trousers. Memorial Day to Labor Day. Now did someone mention a Mint Julep?

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  18. Love the photo of the two young men!

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  19. My husband's formal crew uniform included white bucks. It was almost exactly the same outfit as the photo up top, right down to the blazer patch, except the blazer was double breasted & they had crew ties. Shoes and blazer patch are probably stuck in the back of his closet somewhere - jacket is still put to good use.

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  20. maybe it has something to do with how I dress, but I have always opted for boat shoes or loafers instead of bucks. eventually graduated to shell cordovan loafers.

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  21. I have not been able to find a replacement pair for my worn out bucks.
    Does anyone have any suggestions?

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  22. Ben Silver. Charleston SC

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  23. I was raised wearing brown/white and tan bucks. Looking forward to finding a nice pair to wear again.

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