Monday, January 8, 2018

Question for the Community: Men Untucked?

Photos by Salt Water New England
Question for the community: Tucked or untucked?  Is men wearing shirts untucked a trend or is it here to stay?
































57 comments:

  1. It is generally wrong to tuck in a pull-over such as a polo shirt. Button shirts can be casual or more formal, but generally should be tucked in at all times when worn with long pants. A very casual shirt in a casual setting may be untucked when wearing shorts, I suppose.

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  2. Please tuck in your shirt tails. Exceptions given for shirts that are made to be left untucked. The untucked shirt is just one of the many examples of the continued casualization of our society. I fear we inch closer and closer to the jumpsuits depicted in those old science fiction movies.

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  3. The percentage of time that I go with tucked has been rapidly increasing in direct correlation with my age.

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  4. Pull over - Untucked
    Shirt tales in a semi formal or formal setting/formal fabrics - Tucked
    Shirt tales in an informal setting/"informal" fabrics like flannel - untucked or tucked depending on age/preference.

    - ER

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  5. For button-up shirts:
    With trousers/pants- always tucked in.
    With shorts- tucked in or untucked, but only untucked if it's warm enough to have your sleeves rolled up.

    For t-shirts/polos- either way.

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  6. Tucked, always tucked, the only exception a t-shirt you are wearing to mow the yard, wash the Subaru...at home...

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  7. Interesting question. The examples you have provided support all the above comments. A Christmas card I received included a photograph of my friend with her son (10 years old). She was wearing a lovely dress. Her son was wearing nice slacks and a nice shirt which was not tucked in. I must say, my first reaction was, "Why is his shirt not tucked in?" So, I guess, instinctively, I still vote: Tuck it in. (And that applies to women as well as men.) Just a little push against the sloppiness we see daily.

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  8. In my opinion tucked in definitely looks better.

    I suspect that a factor for a few of us may be this: As we age and get that middle-aged spread, we delude ourselves that it is less apparent with an untucked shirt. Likely faulty thinking, but I have been known to succumb to this questionable logic on occasion.

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  9. Button-down shirts which are worn as shirts (not layered) should always be tucked in, despite J Crew recommendations! Untucked polo shirts all right if the shirt tail isn't too long. I don't think that t-shirts have any standard, and never want to see men wearing tank tops away from a basketball court.

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  10. Polo shirts and tee shirts are best untucked. If wearing a polo shirt to a less casual setting (and arguably a gold course qualifies as "less casual"), by all means tuck it. Button-up shirts should always be tucked, except when worn over a pair of swim trunks on or near a beach or a pool. When I see untucked button-up shirts in other settings, I think "sloppy." Is the untucked shirt thing here to stay? Beats me, but I'm still amazing that combination sleeve lengths have survived this long, not to mention ever-shorter collar points on most brands of OCBD shirts.

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  11. Untucked - on the beach, on the boat, not around town, and never on the golf course. But then, guys wear brown shoes with blue suits, so civilization's end is nigh.

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  12. Depends on the occasion and what I'm wearing with the shirt. Shorts, chinos and jeans in a casual setting - untucked. Chinos, trousers in a smart setting - tucked. Without a jacket - untucked. With a jacket - tucked. And never tuck a polo shirt, except for on the Golf course.

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    1. Exactly. A tucked polo shirt goes nicely with black socks and sandals.

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  13. Untucked is a wardrobe malfunction unless wearing swim shorts.

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    1. This is where my vote is! I’ll admit that younger generations may differ and acknowledge that fashion changes but those of my generation are likely to keep tucking till the end.

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  14. Agree with Govteach...always tucked, unless working around your home if that's comfortable for you.

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  15. Business and formal setting: Always tucked in. But there are no rules for a casual setting. That's a matter of taste.

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  16. I notice one 'modern' shirt company has made a brand out of untucking.

    Anytime the situation calls for it, the shirts get tucked. It's never my decision. I let the environment make the call. (It's much easier that way). Other times, I'm usually tucked, but not always.

    Some unsolicited advice to those who like to work with shirt untucked: be sure your not doing anything where the shirt tail can get caught. Think scarves on ski lifts; not always a prudent idea.

    One variation you don't depict in this series of lovely photos is the untucked shirt under a sweater. If I wear my shirt untucked, it is often under a sweater.

    Aiken

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  17. I really dislike seeing a young (or not so young) man go out for dinner in "dress" jeans with an untucked shirt. He is inevitably accompanied by a young lady dressed to the nines. He looks sloppy. Also makes shorter men look stubby. As a woman, I rarely wear anything but a polo shirt untucked as I think it does nothing for my physique. But look at any fashion magazine or catalogue and all the shirt tales are out. This seems to have been the fashion for quite a long time now. I wish it would pass.

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    1. Alena Kate PettittJanuary 9, 2018 at 8:12 AM

      I couldn't agree more it's this comment. I'm still waiting for the cut of waistbands to rise so that I can actually physically tuck anything in at all!

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    2. Ha! Me too.

      Untucked for men out of their property = sloppy

      MaryAnne

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    3. The best way to deal with "fashion" is to ignore it.

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    4. Alena Kate Pettitt - High Waisted is all they sell where I live any more - it's right on trend. I'm not sure where you're shopping but I can find high waisted (ca. 1940's inspired almost...I've been buying them high rise with a wide leg. Just call me Katherine Hepburn!) trousers all over the place and all of my jeans except my pair I do home renovation projects in (left over from the late 2000's...) have a higher rise. I buy them all with around a 9" rise. And they are not those "mom" jeans from urban outfitters, either.

      - ER

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  18. Alena Kate PettittJanuary 9, 2018 at 8:11 AM

    I don't know what is the consensus on right or wrong but I most definitely prefer a tucked-in look on men. Except for t-shirts, which are casual items in themselves. Polo tops I'm on the fence about. Tucked is better in my opinion but it doesn't look too bad untucked as long as the body is so long it ends up looking like a tunic.

    On holiday in a climate that is far warmer than your native country I would say that untucked and rolled sleeves are kinder to the man - as long as the leisure activities aren't formal in nature.

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    1. Alena Kate PettittJanuary 9, 2018 at 8:44 AM

      EDIT

      *isn't so long it ens up looking like a tunic.

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    2. In a Southern resort, khaki shorts or pants and long-sleeve buttoned-down oxford cloth shirts or polo shirts are the uniform. The formality of the occasion is marked by length of pants, type of shirt, and whether the shirt is tucked. For Church on Sunday, one wears long pants, sleeves rolled down and buttoned, shirt tucked, blazer and tie. For working on the boat, one wears old shirt, sleeves rolled up and untucked with shorts. The real question is when is it appropriate to wear oxblood loafers, boat shoes or flip flops?

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  19. Tuck in button downs, leave casual shirts (like tennis ones) out.

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  20. I want to be sympathetic to hot weather and casual comfort. But Larry Summers illustrated how slippery that slope can be, so I would encourage the effort to please tuck.

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  21. If wearing a sports jacket or suit : Tuck It In . Otherwise :Let it be optional .

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  22. Hey! I know un-tucked crew member in the aft cockpit of Spartan!

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  23. I think the contrast between your first two pictures says it all. You want to look like a grown-up, tuck in your shirt.

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    1. Nailed it. Grown men should dress like grown men.

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  24. I'm old school. My father, four brothers, father-in-law, husband and nephews are all tuckers. The women in my family expect it, and teach it to the generation currently being raised. Personally, I feel a tucked-in look commands respect and shows self-esteem. A good appearance opens many doors.

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  25. I like the look of belts too much to go untucked....some nice belts in these photos. Alas, a sign of the times, though, untucked, unshaven, unshod (flip flops), etc. I think it is laziness more than a fashion statement.

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  26. Always tucked in

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  27. Haha! Nearly everyone has an opinion on this! My rules for men:

    1) If your shoulders are not the broadest part of your body, tuck in the shirt. On a man, an untucked shirt which fits through the shoulders should hang straight down; it shouldn't get "hung up" on the belly or the backside.

    2) If you are not absolutely certain that you are 100% up-to-date on your fashion choices, tuck in the shirt. If you want to wear styles from a few years ago (no matter when that was), go ahead and tuck it in.

    3) If your physique is very good, and you have great posture and style, and you intentionally want a more relaxed vibe, it's okay to untuck in the right circumstances.

    4) Rules for knit shirts & flannel shirts are more relaxed, though the above should still be taken into consideration.

    5) If your pants/trousers are noticeably ill-fitting, you might opt to camouflage with an untucked shirt, as the lesser of two evils.

    6) Don't be unnecessarily hard-core. You don't have to tuck your t-shirt into your swim trunks on the beach.

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  28. Every one of these fellows in these photos looks perfectly appropriate with their shirt in or out. Different activities, weekends, temps, and whatever occasion going on all dictate the style of the day.

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  29. Untucked shirts look fine in casual situations as long as the length and shape of the tail is on point. I will always tuck when wearing long pants.

    I cannot bring myself to tuck any shirt into shorts unless I'm on the golf course. Some people can pull off the look, I cannot. Shorts are as casual as it gets, I don't feel the need to tuck in my shirt - it feels like a strange mix of casual and business casual.

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  30. Always tucked unless you are wearing a tee shirt or polo shirt over your swim shorts.

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  31. Tucked if a man is slim or slim-ish.

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  32. It used to be that only portly (PC for “obese”) men ran around untucked. This made perfect sense if your physique resembled that of Sydney (“Gad, you are a character, sir!”) Greenstreet. Draping fabric over such massive flab has always had a mild masking effect. Now fill in the blank: “Fat men in skin-tight pants look ______.” You’re right. So by all means, keep the cover-up shirt tail hanging out if you have a weight issue. It goes without saying that thin people always look neater tucked in.

    And notice that all the men proudly wearing Leather Man Ltd. theme belts are tucked in. Why have a fun belt on if nobody can see it? The whole point is to emphasize your individuality anyway. Same idea goes for me. I own a bunch of these belts – including the #75 tennis one shown here, and enjoy displaying them (my daughter’s favorite is my swashbuckling #396 Pirate on Black.)
    I think the maxim here is, when in doubt, tuck it in.

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  33. A well-bred gentleman knows there is one answer. Tuck. It is a sign of respect to others and to one's self. It has traditionally been read and recognized as such. Then untuck as the situation allows or the activity requires. A man working his land, or sailing his boat with his shirt untucked is still a gentleman if he maintains his civility and sense of sportsmanship. Clothes, no matter how they are worn, don't mask bad behavior or an unpleasant personality.

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  34. As a postscript to my comment from yesterday, Hawaiian shirts should always be worn untucked. Whether Hawaiian shirts should be worn at all outside of Hawaii is another issue entirely -- one about which I suspect SWNE readers would disagree (although such shirts are frequently seen here in Palm Springs, CA.

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  35. Untuck please! Wear your old blue oxford long sleeve button downs with fraying collars and cuffs on Saturdays untucked with your sleeves rolled -- pair with great shorts and casual sandals. The look is confident, casual and reflects that we are now in 2018 -- not 1988. All great looks gently evolve.

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  36. Untucked shirts have their place at the beach. Hawaiian shirts of course. Tucked at all other times. I am shocked at the Boy Scouts who travel in their Class A uniforms with shirts untucked. I am amazed at how may successful grown men travel and stand in line for First Class and the Sky Club with shirts untucked. Think of the signal this sends to the Boy Scouts of the world and just don't do it. If wearing shirts untucked is the answer, what is the question?

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  37. For me, tuck in any shirt that buttons up the front except for OCBD's, and then only untucked with shorts. Polo's can go either way. Long pants means tuck in your shirt unless you are actually working on a hot day. Leaving shirts untucked just looks sloppy or like the man is trying to follow the latest style. Grace and good grooming is not presently much in fashion. The wheel will turn. I do like the look of a lady wearing a man's old shirt untucked with the sleeves rolled up. There is style there.

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  38. Younger = untucked; older = tucked.

    It's similar to younger women not wearing pantyhose, although I think the age ranges for the two phenomena are different.

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  39. My friend and I have similar, fairly well proportioned physiques but we are short. My friend, a native New Yorker insists on wearing his knit shirts untucked which gives the appearance of him wearing a tunic or toga but I insist on wearing mine tucked which gives the impression that I'm a Michelin Man with only one roll that runs around my body just underneath my waistband. If you find either visually repulsive, just try to picture me with a Rugby shirt tucked in. They were popular for casual wear years ago and the one I had was a gift from my mother-in-law so it had to be worn. No, just can't imagine having a knit/golf shirt tailored.

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  40. Always tucked excepted Polos pool side or Hawaiian shirts worn only in Hawaii

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  41. Ah, the age-old battle between style (which today is becoming something of a rarity), and fashion (which, sadly, never seems to go out of fashion). We all aspire to style; often and usually, someone else's - and sometimes sucomb to fashion, despite our better judgement. On the surface, this can appear to be the fault of relatives and friends - though closer examination generally reveals the true culprit. In any case, unless engaged in some sort of physical labour, or sporting activity, tucked is often less slovenly (I'd employ "sloppy", but that word has recently entered into the realm of popular culture, and hence fashion; which has the habit of being in today, and yesterday's news tomorrow...).

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  42. Untucked button-front shirts look sloppy, in my opinion. Knit polo shirts are acceptable untucked, but I'd never be caught doing so. Tuck in your shirt tails, and wear a belt!

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  43. Tuck your shirt in. Period.

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  44. If you're by the pool (or mowing the lawn), untucked. Otherwise, tuck those shirts in...please. AnnZ in metro DC

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