Sunday, November 26, 2017

Reader Question: What to Do About Lint on Waxed Cotton Barbours?

Barbour with Lint (and Feathers) - Photo by Salt Water New England
Reader Question:
I love your blog and check it at least once a day...and I am definitely not a blog person!  
Question for the Community:  
I am really enjoying wearing my new Barbour wax jacket.  I've had quilted Barbours in the past and recently got my first wax jacket.  I'm noticing that the waxed cotton is collecting a lot of lint.  Any suggestions to minimize this?

11 comments:

  1. Wash it off with a garden hose, hang to dry.

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  2. I once toyed with the idea of buying a wax jacket. I went through all the pros, cons, quirks and thought about the examples of where I'd seen them in use. I know of a couple of farmers who wear wax Barbours which are probably older than me. It's fair to say the years and years of mud, wax, oil and lint are holding the things together! I came to the conclusion that "you're either a wax jacket person or you're not". If you're worrying about lint on your wax jacket, I'd suggest you may be the latter. For the record, I didn't buy one in the end.

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    1. We visited the Barbour outlet this summer. Being southerners we were delighted to find out about it from this blog. I personally was so thrilled to finely own there is no description to describe my joy. My husband bought many shirts and a jacket. I am so excited to own one. The Queen of England is seen wearing one as well as Dutchess Kate and other Royals. We live in the Plantation area in the South where they are held in high esteem. I suggest you change your mind and do purchase one or two.

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    2. It's interesting to get an American take on the wax Barbour. They're not held in as high esteem in England by anyone outside of the upper and middle classes. They can be seen as being a bit 'stuffy'. Personally I love the look of them when they are a few years old and start to look worn in, but only in the right environment; on the farm or in the field. They just don't have the same appeal at music festivals or on the high street. The photo above is where I would expect to see a wax Barbour, and being used for its intended purpose.

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  3. The lint is really part of the process …

    After a year or two of good wear, the wax wears off, a bit of a patina develops, and the lint isn’t an issue. But then, it’s time for a re-waxing. The lint comes back, of course, but after a year or two, an even deeper patina develops and the lint can’t be found. Then it’s time for a re-waxing …

    You see, lint is just a part of the process of a well-developed, deep Barbour patina.

    Aiken (who usually goes 4-5 years between wax jobs)

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  4. Get a Sticky-roller lint removal thing ( that's a technical description ... ) from the laundry section . Roll up and down a few times : problem solved ! Good on corduroy too .

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  5. Barbours of 30-40 years ago had a lot more tack than they do now - I suspect the technology/wax formula has changed. I remember my parents' jackets had a positive oil feel. The jackets went from country to town jaunts happily. As others have noted, a wipe with damp cloth/sponge or spray with garden hose - then a quick dry off with a towel did the trick. Barbours, like the dogs, fared better when toweled off after a good wetting.

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  6. A reply to Mad Dog and Englishmen. You are exactly correct in stating Barbour's have their own special place. We live in an area where forest, streams and hunting hold high esteem. The upper crust flies in during holidays to enjoy the hospitality on the large farms. Fishing is an everyday enjoyment. I adore my new coat and will wear it simply because it is British. God Save the Queen!

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  7. I never noticed a lint problem with my waxed jacket in Filson cover cloth. While I tried on several sizes of Barbour Beaufort jackets, the sleeves were notably short. The haberdasher insisted the sleeves could be lengthened by sending it back to the factory in Great Britain, but that a gentleman should in any event wish to display some sweater at the sleeve end. On a rainy weather jacket, really?

    I found the Filson in size Large to be a better fit for my quite normal size 42 jacket, 34 inch sleeved shirt, arms. While I miss the Barbour's rear game pocket, the Filson is sturdy, quite attractive, and can easily be re-waxed at home, no specialist service required. Edgar

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