Sunday, September 10, 2017

Question for the Community: How Do You Prepare for a Storm?

Photographs of Irene and Sandy Damage from SWNE Archives
Dear Editor, As we are waiting for Irma to make her way to Southwest Georgia, a question for the community.  How do you prepare for a storm ... your home, your pets and yourself?  Prayers will be greatly appreciated.






11 comments:

  1. I live in SE Texas. We just lived through Harvey. 51 inches of rain. We live 3 feet about the ground and we were lucky, most of my neighborhood flooded. 65% of my county flooded.
    That said, Even with food, water prep, I was evacuated to higher ground by the so-called Cajun Navy. I was on an island with rising water and was forced to ask for help. I never thought an 18 ft boat with an 85hp Johnson motor would be able to pull up to my front porch.
    It will be months if not years before the area is back to some form of ' normal.'
    The local schools flooded with 6-8 feet of water and we do not know when classes will resume in those buildings. The kids will be bussed 11-12 miles away to other district facilities.
    We have helped friends/neighbors whose homes have flooded and they have lost TVs, bedrooms, rugs, dining sets, shelves, their Sheetrock up to 5 foot above the floor...drive down any local street and it it looks like a war zone.
    The local county administartors are predicting that 10 to 25% of the population who evaculated will never return.
    Prepare? I have lived through Ike, Rita and now Harvey, and Harvey was the worst. There was nothing we could have done to prepare for 50 inches of rain. Nothing.
    Sorry to be pessimistic, but it's been a heck of a fortnight.

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    1. I know .....my home was flooded in 1994 and just about finishing repairs from a January 2nd tornado and now Irma is coming. I am ready to stop participating in natural disasters! From my experience fema is worthiness. My prayers go out to you. Once the storm is over the rest of the world forgets. Take care, Lisa


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  2. And BTW to SW Georgia, we are praying for you here in SE Texas. Nobody should go through what we just did.....and we pray you do not.

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  3. I'm not sure how much anyone can really prepare besides the basics, flashlights, batteries, remove outside items like porch furniture, etc. We live in New England, and our biggest storms are blizzards. We purchased a stand-by generator years ago, and it gives us tremendous peace of mind. But, of course, they don't work under water. It all depends on where you live. I sincerely wish the best for all who have either just gone through this or are sitting waiting nervously.

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  4. I have a home on Saint Simons Island, Georgia. I prepare by securing all outside furniture. I stock water, canned goods, and paper products. Then, I leave. I have done this three times in the last 20 years including currently. The only damage (so far) has been fallen trees. I am an advocate of leaving if you live on a barrier island. Fortunately, leaving is not a financial burden for me. Many people who live from paycheck to paycheck must juggle the cost of staying away 4 or 5 days as well as the lost of income. This makes the decision much harder. Prayers are appreciated.

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  5. There are storms and there are storms. One place I worked for nearly fifteen years was flooded three times, the last time in 1975. All were sudden, too, practically flash floods. Extensive work since then has prevented any more flooding. But flooding is a highly localized event and where it has flooded before, it will probably flood again. The Mississippi, for instance, has always flooded. You can't really prepare for a flood but you can be prepared to leave.

    Power outages, usually caused by snowstorms, are a different matter and you can't really go anywhere in a snowstorm. For that you should be prepared to do without power for an indefinite period. But you won't have to worry about that for a few months yet and you'll never have to worry about it in Florida or South Texas.

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  6. Candles, batteries, water, TP, and . . . booze.

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  7. The way I prepare for a storm has changed over the years. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve gotten (somewhat) wiser. Thus, 30 years ago saw me standing on the Washington Street bridge in South Norwalk the midst of Hurricane Gloria to “see just how strong the winds really are.” I don’t do that anymore (thankfully).

    Our last significant hurricane was Sandy when we lost power for eight days. After no water for a week (we have a well), we installed a modest generator that runs off propane. It will keep the lights on, water running, and the heat going for 3-4 days. We’ve used it several times in thunder storms since, and are very glad we have it.

    Because of Sandy, we were unable to get out of our driveway due to fallen branches and a tree. We wound up getting a chain saw after that, which has been another good investment, as we use it more than just occasionally.
    Although we have large glass windows, we don’t tape them. I’ve never been sure what that is supposed to do, as it seems that strong winds won’t be impeded by a few inches of tape?

    We have candles, extra flashlights, batteries and dry foods stocked and ready. We also stow any lawn furniture and pick up any fallen sticks from the yard. I’ve seen high winds make missiles out of sticks and tree branches.

    Aiken

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  8. I cannot imagine what you who have experienced Harvey, and now Irma, are going through. I hope that aid, friends and family will help you back on your feet. We are in earthquake country and are constantly being told to prepare for the Big One. We are all supposed to have a "go to" bag, but honestly, access to the bag can be iffy depending where you are when the Big One hits. In this "go to" bag (e.g., lightweight backpack) are the minimal supply/items: waterproof long lasting flashlight and batteries, water packets with electrolytes, windbreaker, Cliff bars, medicine (including Rx, Rx glasses) antibiotic ointment, a good pair of walking shoes - the kind that will protect you when walking over glass, gloves (in case you need to clear sharp objects), emergency thermal blanket (those foil things),cell phone and radio with solar charger in plastic ziplock. My heart goes out to you and may God bless you.

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    1. You are so correct. The one thing I made sure was taken care of was my prescription refills. My pharmacist even filled a 'script a couple of days early because she knew what was coming out of the Gulf.

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  9. We are on the Gulf Coast of Florida. Hurricane Irma could have been much, much worse. We prepared by covering doors and windows, checking the roof for any loose shingles, checking the generator, making sure we had fuel, extension cords. Bought non perishable food, plenty of water, dog food, snacks and some champagne for when it passed us. Made sure everyone had their meds and we had enough baby supplies. We estimated for 7-10 days. We evacuated family from a beachfront condo and a mobile home in a 55+ community to our block home. We put important papers and keepsakes in a plastic box in the dishwasher. Then we waited, played cards, talked, got updates on our phones and battery powered radio. Today it is sunny and there is a light breeze, a beautiful day! We hope Jose goes out to sea and not to the East Coast!

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