Tuesday, August 15, 2017

How Do You Prepare Your Eggplant?

This Week's CSA

16 comments:

  1. The taste of eggplant is amazingly delicate for a vegetable with such dramatic coloring. Olive oil coated, sprinkling of kosher salt flakes and grilled. Serve hot or cold. To gild the lily dress lightly with white zinfandel.

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  2. We don't usually personally prepare it. We leave that to the boys at Olde World. They slice it thin and bread it. Then it goes into a 700+ degree oven atop a plain pie with a little garlic and grated cheese. What emerges is the best eggplant pie in the New Haven area, ergo il mondo.

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  3. Our local newspaper just featured a recipe for Eggplant Carponata which is a sweet, sour dish known in Italian cooking as agrodolce. After roasting the vegetables, the mixture is stored in a glass container and the flavors improve after 24 hours. It was well worth the small effort and tasted great served as a bruschetta or as a vegetable side dish. So far, it has been my favorite way of eating eggplant other than in lasagna.

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  4. Slice it...dip it in raw scrambled eggs...dip it in bread crumbs with garlic powder...fry it in butter in a pan. Serve with warm organic spaghetti sauce for dipping. Delicious!

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  5. JVK, would you care to share that recipe? I simply adore eggplant, and it sounds delicious.

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    1. Eggplant Caponata
      (I apologize, I added an 'r' to the name above)

      1 eggplant (about 1 pound), peeled & cut into small dice
      2 T salt
      1 red bell pepper, seeded & cut into small dice
      3/4 cup minced onion
      1 tsp. minced garlic
      1/4 cup olive oil
      2 cups canned diced tomatoes
      2 T tomato paste
      2 T basil chiffonade
      1 tsp. minced marjoram
      1 T balsamic vinegar
      1/3 cup finely grated Parmesan

      Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Place eggplant in a large bowl & sprinkle with salt. Place eggplant in a colander and allow to drain for 20 minutes. Quickly rinse the eggplant under cool water, then place on paper towels to absorb excess moisture.

      In a large bowl, combine the eggplant with the bell pepper, onion, garlic and oil, and toss to combine. Add the tomatoes and tomato paste and toss to thoroughly combine. Spread the vegetable mixture evenly on a baking sheet and roast for about 45 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender and lightly browned. Remove the pan from the oven and add the basil, marjoram and vinegar. Gently fold the ingredients together.

      Transfer the caponata to a glass or stainless steel container with a lid. Let cool to room temperature, then stir in the cheese. Refrigerate the caponata in the covered container for up to a week. The flavor will improve if the caponata is allowed to rest for at least 24 hours before use. (Serve at room temperature as a side dish or spread over toasted Italian bread - I melted cheese over top and it was wonderful.)

      Check out the New York Times recipe for caponata. It looks good, too.

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    2. Many thanks for taking the time to reply and to post this recipe, JVK! You've made my eggplant-loving family very happy. I can't wait to try it. Kind regards!

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    3. You are quite welcome, Anon @ 3:34. It was my pleasure. I hope your family enjoys the tasty medley of vegetables as we did. The New York Times recipe calls for capers and I think olives plus a bit more vinegar. This is a recipe to play with to suit your liking. Enjoy!

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  6. It always goes into a Greek Moussaka for us... Good Housekeeping provide a great recipe.

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  7. Eggplant Parmesan! Fry thin slices, lay out on paper towels to dry. Layer in deep pan, top with fresh tomato sauce and cheese. Broil in the oven for 10 minutes. - PCC

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  8. There's an Italian restaurant in Old Saybrook, CT, that serves an appetizer called "Melenzane Alla Mozzarella." They slice eggplant across leaving the skin on, drizzle the slices with olive oil, top with mozzarella cheese and some fresh herbs...basil or oregano, a little chopped garlic and onion...and bake. It is so yummy but not nearly as unhealthy as the breaded variety which sops up too much oil. A couple slices makes a great lunch. And yes, I've even tried to replicate the dish at home. Pretty simple.

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    1. Thank you for sharing this recipe. I am delighted to have found a new way to prepare eggplant that is easy and delicious. I sniped oregano and marjoram from the herb garden and will try another combination next time. I'm curious - how long do you bake this and at what temp?

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  9. If I get a bunch, I slice thin with a mandolin and layer on a cookie pan, either drizzled with oil or breaded with corn flake crumbs; bake 400 about 20 minutes. Then you have a pile of them to either layer with sauce and cheese for parmesan, or spread with hummus or ricotta and slice for pinwheels, or use with a dipping sauce. Handy for unexpected guests.

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  10. I love eggplant parm as much as anyone else, but when I'm cooking it myself, it always goes, sauteed, into a curry! (Often with potatoes, onions, zucchini, and whatever other delicious veggies come in our CSA that week. If you have a few cloves of garlic and a bit of fresh ginger, all the better.) I just mix 2 tablespoons red curry paste (Thai Kitchen is good and has all recognizable ingredients), a can of coconut milk, and 2 tablespoons of brown sugar, and pour it over the sauteed eggplant, and let the flavors meld for about 20 minutes.

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  11. I have fallen in love with Maureen Abood's family recipe for sheik al mehshee, which is an eggplant parmesan gratin with a Lebanese-Italian twist. It is absolutely delicious. Her charming blog and cookbook, Rose Water & Orange Blossoms, are worth it just for this recipe and the lovely story behind its origins.

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  12. The eggplants at our farm are beautiful right now! I hate to pick them, because they are so nice, but I do! I like to slice it fairly thin, bread it with seasoned bread crumbs, give it a spray of oil, and then roast it until light brown and softened. I usually throw some sliced mushrooms, shallots, red pepper and thin slices of zucchini and summer squash on the pan. When slightly crisp, I then layer the veggies in a glass baking dish, with parm and cheddar cheese, a sprinkling of more crumbs, fresh herbs such as oregano, parsley and thyme, and drizzle with olive oil. Bake until bubbly - "eggplant au gratin."

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