Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Fresh Duck Eggs

Duck Eggs, Pullet Eggs, and a Few Dog Hairs

Spode

With Pullet Egg

With Duck Egg

9 comments:

  1. Hum, duck eggs. I never tried them. What is the taste difference between duck and pullet eggs? Any particular way of using them? I've seen quail eggs for sale, never bought any but had them at a fabulous dinner at Blue Hill at Stone Barns restaurant in Pocantico, NY. Lovely Spode egg cups! I have a collection of Royal Worcester egg coddlers. Isn't everything related to eggs just wonderful!

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    1. Duck eggs are heartier than the average egg. In my opinion they taste a bit more gamey, for lack of a better term. We prefer them hard boiled to soft boiled in our house, and they do better with stronger flavors when fried or in omelettes than the average egg. I'll often pull rosemary, chives, and oregano straight out of the garden, mince them, and throw them on top of the fried egg when it's juuuust about done.

      Pullet eggs are favored for pastry making and baking - if I find some pullet eggs at the farmer's market then I reserve them to bake because I feel like that's where they best serve the food. It's said that the yolks are extra rich and they have amazing flavor but TBH, I cannot tell the difference in taste from a pullet egg and a regular egg when fried or boiled. I do notice a textural difference when I bake with them so that's why I save them for that.

      - ER

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    2. Thank you, ER. That's fascinating information. I don't have exposure to duck eggs but if I ever do, I will try them. The farm I buy my eggs from sells a mixture of eggs including brown, white and blue plus they are variable sizes. Is there any way to identify whether any are pullet?

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    3. JVK -

      Pullet eggs are eggs from the chicken's first year of laying. They are typically smaller than regular eggs. I would ask if they have/sell pullet eggs so that you are getting actual pullet eggs and not just small eggs (which, to be honest, are really tough to find in these days of Jumbo and XL eggs everywhere.) Don't forget to convert your egg sizes if you do end up baking with pullet eggs. If the recipe calls for one egg you may need more than one pullet egg to make up the volume.

      - ER

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    4. Thank you, again ER. I will be sure to ask about the pullet eggs. While I appreciate the eclectic free range, grain fed eggs I buy, most of them don't fit into my refrigerator egg bin. There are usually only a couple of small ones in a carton so it makes me wonder if they are pullet. So far, I haven't ruined a recipe with the "eggs on steroids" but I can see where it can pose a baking problem.

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  2. I have noticed that most of my favorite patterns come from Spode. . .

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  3. Have a service for ten of Blue Italian and have never used the egg cups. Also have a collection of R W coddlers which I do use from time to time. Something most pleasing about eggs, oval shape, the smooth shell and yummy goodness when cooked! Never met an egg I didn't like! PA

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  4. When I was a child, the duck egg was always the prize egg at the family Easter egg hunt. The one who found it got a giant (to a child, at least) chocolate bunny.

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  5. What a beautiful spread! It' looks like you've had a good morning.

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