Thursday, June 22, 2017

Question for the Community: Placement of Four Club Initials


Question for the Community From a Reader:
I am the founder of a racquetball club at work.  Yes, that’s the sport referred to by Ms. Baumbach as ‘fast, sweaty, and a bit proletarian.’  Anyway, I am considering giving my club members custom T-shirts.  I would like the design to have crossed racquets and our initials, but I am unsure of the sequence.  The initials are ABRC.  Would it be:
3* added based on Kristen’s comment; 4* added based on JVK’s comment; 5* added based on Marisa’s comment; 6* added based on Mad Dogs and Englishmen’s comment; 7* added based on Marisa’s comment; 8* added based on Adrienne's comment

Of course, there is always the possibility that none are correct.  Please let me know how to proceed with this matter.

23 comments:

  1. I'm no expert on monogramming (though I suspect some here are and may have better answers for you!), but I'd imagine that the A and B should be across from each other and the R and C, similarly (I assume they stand for "Racquet Club). So, I'd go with not 1 or 2, but instead pair A on top of B with R next to C, or vice versa.

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  2. I agree with Kristin.

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  3. I don't think there is a right or wrong way to place your initials, but it should appeal to the eye as well as make sense. Separating the initials around the rackets reminds me of tic tac toe, and it's hard to tell which is the first initial. Why not try A B on the center left and RC on the center right of the rackets?

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  4. If you want to put them in a circle, clockwise, I'd probably begin with the A in the "9 o'clock" position. It feels a little more natural to read it that way, I think.

    You could google "crossed initials" to see whether there's some standard or form you'd like to replicate.

    I believe it's generally either done like #3, or like #3 with the axes reversed: A/B on the horizontal axis and R/C on the vertical axis (still using left-to-right and top-to-bottom order). The latter is probably what I'd use, myself.

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    1. If separating all the initials, I agree with Marisa about starting with left-to-right (AB) and top-to-bottom (RC). The eye naturally reads left to right so it's logical that the important initials begin there.

      On example 4, the size of the rackets can make all the difference in how that logo appears.

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    2. You're onto something, JVK. If you look at the logo for the Racquet Club of Philadelphia, it also uses crossed racquets with the year of its founding (1889) separated into the left and right quadrants. You know instantly what it's saying.

      So I'm going to vote early and often. I cast another ballot for #4.

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    3. KIS; you got my vote.

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  5. Tough one. I agree with the tac tac toe thought and I think #4 is very nice but it might look like the initials of two individuals? Good luck!

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  6. I'm a little confused. By Ms. Baumbach, do you mean Lisa Birnbach? If so, I think that you're approaching this as a monogram. It's not. It's a logo and I vote with JVK (#4).

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  7. None of those work for me. As we predominantly read from left to right, starting at the top line and finishing at the bottom line, I'd start with A at the top, B to the left, R to the right and C at the bottom.

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  8. I'd cross the racquets at the top and have ABRC centred underneath them. Otherwise it's just too confusing.
    Adrienne from Toronto

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    1. Interesting. I don't think Muffy has run this template up yet, am I wrong? I'd like to see it.

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    2. CORRECTION: Thanks Muffy. Assuming the writer/questioner plans to replicate the very long/fat head and the very short shaft of the racquet itself, it becomes difficult to imagine those singular features coexisting with the letters in any of the above examples, except #8.

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  9. I agree with Cranky Yankee. This is not a monogram. So #4.

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  10. Astethetically, I find #4 most pleasing

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  11. I believe #4 looks the most simple, classic, and timeless. Less is more.

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  12. I think #5 makes the most sense to me followed by #3.

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  13. Number 3 crossed rackets and crossed letters very symbolic ij

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  14. This is refreshing commentary. I read through the comments expecting to find snide remarks on the fact that this emblem is going on a t-shirt. I thought I'd find negative comments and instead found people trying to offer help. How nice.

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